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Full text of "Bulletin of Wake Forest College"

BULLETIN OF 
WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 




CATALOG ISSUE 



WINSTON-SALEM 



NORTH CAROLINA 



JANUARY 1961 



FOR STUDENTS ENTERING IN 
ACADEMIC YEAR 1961-62 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Inquiries to the College should be addressed as indi- 
cated below: 

Admissions .Director of Admissions 

Alumni Affairs . Director of Alumni Ac- 
tivities 

Athletics Director of Athletics 

Business Administration .... Dean of School of Business 

Administration 

Catalogs Director of Admissions 

Financial Matters Treasurer 

General Policy of the College.President 

Gifts and Bequests President 

Graduate Studies Director of Graduate Stud- 
ies 
Housing — 

Men Director of Residences 

Women Dean of Women 

Law Dean of School of Law 

Medicine Director of Admissions 

Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

Placement Director of Placement 

Bureau 
Public Relations and De- 
velopment Program President 

Scholarships Committee on Scholarships 

Student Affairs Dean of the College 

Summer Session Dean of Summer Session 

Transcripts Registrar 

All addresses, except Medicine, are: 

Wake Forest College, Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



. - 




Air view of a part of the Campus 




Plaza with Wait Chapel in the distance 




The Z. Smith Reynolds Library 




Entrance to one of the women s dormitories 




A court in one of the men's dormitories 




"S3 

K 



<5j 

"ts 

K 



53 




y^ f ■ 

Commencement in Wait Chapel 



New Series 



January 1961 Vol. LVI. No. 1 



Wake Forest College 



bulletin 




CATALOG 

ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR 
ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1961-1962 



Published six times annually by Wake Forest College 

Entered at the post office at Winston-Salem, North Carolina, 
as second class matter. 

Accepted for mailing on July 26, 1918, at special rate of postage provided 

by Act of Congress of October 3, 1917, amended 

by Act of February 28, 1925 





1961 






JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 




SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


12 3 4 6 6 7 
8 91011 121314 
151617 1819 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


1 
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 1011 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 


1 
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
910 11 12 13 14 15 
16171819 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 910 11 121314 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 1516 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 


12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 1011 1213 
14 1516 171819 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 910 11 12 

131415 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 91011 

12 13 14 15 1617 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 91011 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 910 
11 1213 1415 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 1213 1415 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 1213 1415 16 
1718 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 




1962 






JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 




SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 91011 1213 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 1718 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 1718 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 91011 12 

13 1415 16 1718 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
1213 14 15 16 1718 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 910 
11 1213 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 1213 1415 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

91011 121314 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


1 
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
91011 12131415 
16 1718 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 









EDWARDS S BROUGHTON CO.. RALEISH 



June 


12 


Monday 


June 


13 


Tuesday 


July 


21 


Friday 


>iy 


24 


Monday 


July 


25 


Tuesday 



August 26 Saturday 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Summer Session 1961 

Registration First Term 
Classes begin 
First Term ends 
Registration Second Term 
Classes begin 
Session ends 



Sept. 

Sept. 
Sept. 

Sept. 
Sept. 

Sept. 
Sept. 



6 
11 

11 
12 

13 
27 



Fall Term 1961 

Wednesday 9:00 Dormitories open for students 

1 1 :00 Cafeteria open 

Wednesday 7:30 ) Orientation for freshmen 
2:00\ 



Monday 12: 



and transfer students 



Monday 
Tuesday 



8:00 
4:30 



V Regist: 



October 28 
Nov. 1 



Nov. 

Nov. 
Nov. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

January 



23 
26 



Wednesday 8:00 
Wednesday 4:30 

Saturday 
Wednesday 4:30 

Monday 

Thursday { 
Sunday ) 



27 Monday 



8:00 



17 
2 



January 3 

January 15 

January 16 

January 1 7 

January 25 



Sunday ) 
Tuesday) 

Wednesday 8:00 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 9:00 

Thursday 5:00 



ration 

Classes begin 

Last day for dropping a class 

without penalty 
Homecoming (Holiday) 

Last day for settlement of 

tuition for first semester 
Mid-term reports due 

Thanksgiving recess 

Classes resumed 

Christmas recess 

Classes resumed 
Tuesday classes will meet 
Reading Day 
Examinations begin 
Examinations ends 



Spring Term 1962 



January 
January 


29 
30 


Monday 
Tuesday 


8:00/ 
4:30* 


Registration 


January 


31 


Wednesday 


8:00 


Classes begin 


Feb. 


1 


Thursday 




Founders' Day 


Feb. 

March 

March 


14 

1 

26 


Wednesday 

Thursday 

Monday 


4:30 
4:30 


Last day for dropping a class 

without penalty 
Last day for settlement of 

tuition for second semester 
Mid-term reports due 


April 
April 


19 
25 


Thursday i 
Wednesday ' 


1 


Spring recess 


April 


26 


Thursday 


8:00 


Classes resumed 


May 


22 


Tuesday 




Reading Day 


May 


23 


Wednesday 


9:00 


Examinations begin 


May 


31 


Thursday 


5:00 


Examinations end 


June 


3 


Sunday 




Baccalaureate Sermon 


June 


4 


Monday 




Alumni Day and Graduation 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Introductory 7 

Administration and Instruction 9 

The College and Its Equipment 44 

General Information 59 

College Charges and Financial Arrangements .... 75 

Scholarships, Concessions and Loan Funds 90 

Activities 100 

Requirements for Degrees 112 

Courses in Liberal Arts 129 

School of Business Administration 217 

Division of Graduate Studies 234 

School of Law 235 

Bowman Gray School of Medicine 243 

Evening Classes 248 

Summer Session 249 

Degrees Conferred 251 

Summaries 262 

Index 266 



INTRODUCING THE COLLEGE 

Location 
Wake Forest College is located at Winston-Salem, 
North Carolina, on the western outskirts of the city. 
The College consists of the following divisions: the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts, the School of Law, the School of 
Business Administration, and the Bowman Gray School 
of Medicine. 

Recognition 

Wake Forest College is a member of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and the 
Association of American Colleges. The College has 
chapters of the principal national social fraternities, 
professional fraternities and honor societies, including 
Phi Beta Kappa. 

The School of Law is a member of the Association of 
American Law Schools, and is on the approved list 
of the Council on Legal Education of the American 
Bar Association. 

The Bowman Gray School of Medicine, a four-year 
medical college, is a member of the Association of Ameri- 
can Medical Colleges, and is on the approved list of the 
Council on Medical Education of the American Medical 
Association. 

The School of Business Administration is a Member 
of the American Association of Collegiate Schools of 
Business. 

Although Wake Forest was primarily a college for 
men for more than 100 years, women have been regu- 
larly admitted to all classes and to the professional 
schools since 1942. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Terms Expire December SI, 1961 



'William L. Bingham, Lexington Herbert Jenkins, Aulander 

James C. Cammack, Jr., Fayetteville Charles H. Larkins, Kinston 

Gilmer H. Cross, Goldsboro 0. M. Mull, Shelby 

Mrs. Earl C. James, Elkin James S. Potter, Charlotte 

Charles B. Summet, Shelby 



Terms Expire December SI, 196S 

Glenn R. Clark, Reidsville Hubert F. Ledford, Raleigh 

Walter E. Crissman, High Point Lex Marsh, Charlotte 

C. 0. Greene, Lawndale George Pennell, Asheville 

Paul W. Johnson, Winston-Salem Leon L. Rice, Jr., Winston-Salem 

j Lowell F. Sodeman, Rocky Mount 



Terms Expire December SI, 196S 

L. Y. Ballentine, Raleigh Marion J. Davis, Winston-Salem 

Henry L. Bridges, Raleigh Johnson J. Hates, Wilkesboro 

3 J. E. Broyhill, Lenoir G. Maurice Hill, Drexel 

William J. Conrad, Winston-Salem Sam Holbrook, Statesville 

4 0. Jack Murpht, Hickory 



Terms Expire December SI, 1984 

V. Ward Barr, Gastonia C. Rush Hamrick, Shelby 

Botce Brooks, Boone Carl McCraw, Charlotte 

Mrs. Rot B. Culler, Sr., High Point James W. Mason, Laurinburg 
Wendell G. Davis, Charlotte Robert H. Owen, Canton 

H. Clotd Philpott, Lexington 



Officers 

For One-Year Term Beginning January i, ig6i 
William J. Conrad, Winston-Salem, President 
Lex Marsh, Charlotte, Vice-President 

Talgott W. Brewer, Box 267, Raleigh, Treasurer Emeritus 
Worth H. Copeland, Box 7201, Winston-Salem, Secretary and 

Treasurer 
J. W. Bunn, Box 527, Raleigh, General Counsel 



1 To fill unexpired term of D. Swan Haworth, resigned June 6, 1960 

2 To fill unexpired term of Fritz D. Hemphill, resigned June 6, 1960 

3 To fill unexpired term of Woodrow W. Hill, resigned June 15, 1960. 

4 To fill unexpired term of O. V. Hamrick, died October 25, 1960. 



ADMINISTRATION 



Harold Wayland Tribble, M.A., Th.M., Th.D., Ph.D., D.D., 
LL.D. 

President 

B.A., University of Richmond, 1919; Th.M., Southern Baptist Theological Semi- 
nary, 1922; Th.D., ibid., 1925; M.A., University of Louisville, 1927; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Edinburgh, 1937; D.D., Stetson University, 1930; LL.D., Union 
University, 1939, Wake Forest College, 1948, University of Richmond, 1949, Duke 
University, 1952, University of North Carolina, 1952; Assistant Professor of The- 
ology, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1925-28; Professor of Theology, 
ibid., 1929-47; President, Andover Newton Theological School, 1947-50; President, 
Wake Forest College, since 1950. 

Edwin Graves Wilson, A.M., Ph.D. 

Dean of the College 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1943; A.M., Harvard University, 1948; Ph.D., ibid., 
1952; Instructor in English, Wake Forest College, 1946-47, 1951-52; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of English, 1952-57; Associate Professor of English, ibid., 1957-59; Professor 
of English, ibid., since 1959; Assistant Dean of the College, ibid., 1957-58; Acting 
Dean of the College, ibid., 1958-60; Dean of the College, ibid., since 1960. 

Robert Allen Dyer, Th.M., Th.D. 

Assistant Dean of the College 

B.A., Louisiana State University, 1935; Th.M., Southern Baptist Theological Semi- 
nary, 1939; Th.D., ibid., 1946; Professor of Bible and Psychology, Gardner-Webb 
Junior College, 1946-1956; Graduate Student Columbia University, Summers 
1949, 1950; Instructor in Religion, Wake Forest College, 1956-57 ; Assistant Professor 
of Religion, ibid., 1957-60; Associate Professor of Religion, ibid., since 1960; As- 
sistant Dean of the College, ibid., since 1959. 



Mark H. Reece, B.S. 

Director of Student Affairs 
B.S., Wake Forest College, 1949; Associate Director of Alumni Activities, ibid., 
1956-58; Director of Student Affairs, ibid., since 1958. 

Gaines M. Rogers, M.A., Ph.D. 

Dean of the School of Business Administration 

B.S., Clemson College, 1942; M.A., University of Virginia, 1945; Ph.D., ibid., 1946; 
Assistant Professor of Economics, Baylor University, 1946; Associate Professor 
and Chairman of Economics, ibid., 1947; Professor of Business Administration, 
Wake Forest College, since 1948; Dean of the School of Business Administration, 
ibid., since 1949. 

Carroll W. Weathers, B.A., LL.B. 
Dean of the School of Law 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1922; LL.B., ibid,. 1923; General Practice, 1923-1950; 
Visiting Professor of Law, University of North Carolina, Summer 1954; Chair- 
man, Commission on Legislative Representation of the State of North Carolina, 
1955-1957; Dean of the School of Law and Professor of Law, Wake Forest College, 
since 1950. 



Administration 



Coy C. Carpenter, M.D. 

Dean of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

B.A. in Medicine, Wake Forest College, 1922; M.D., Syracuse University School of 
Medicine, 1924; Instructor in Pathology and Assistant Attending Pathologist to 
the University Hospital, Syracuse University, 1924-25; Resident Physician and 
Instructor in Clinical Medicine, Syracuse University Hospital, 1925-26; Pathol- 
ogist, various hospitals throughout North Carolina, since 1926; Fulbright Lec- 
turer in Pathology, Fouad University Faculty of Medicine and Ibrahim Uni- 
versity Faculty of Medicine, Cairo, Egypt, 1953-54; Professor of Pathology, Wake 
Forest College, since 1926; Assistant Dean of the School of Medicine, 1935-36; 
Dean of the School of Medicine, since 1936. 

Manson Meads, M.D., D.Sc. 

Executive Dean of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

B.A., University of California, 1939; M.D., Temple University Medical School, 
1943; D.Sc, Temple University, 1956; Research Fellow and Assistant in Medicine, 
Harvard Medical School, 1944-46; Ernst Fellow and Assistant in Bacteriology, 
ibid., 1946-47; Instructor in Medicine, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, 1947-50; 
Markle Scholar in Medical Sciences, ibid., 1948-52; Assistant Professor of Medicine, 
ibid., 1951-57; Associate Professor and Director of the Department of Preventive 
Medicine, ibid., 1951-55; Professor of Preventive Medicine, ibid., 1955-57; Associate 
Dean, ibid., 1955-58; Professor of Medicine, ibid., since 1957; Academic Dean, 
ibid., 1958-59; Executive Dean, ibid., since 1959. 

Donald Michael Hayes, B.S., M.D. 

Assistant Dean of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1951; M.D., Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake 
Forest College, 1954; Medical Intern, Salt Lake County General Hospital 1954-55; 
Fellow in Psychiatry, Louisville General Hospital, 1955-56; Assistant Resident 
in Medicine, North Carolina Baptist Hospital, 1956-57; Resident in Medicine, 
ibid., 1957-58; Fellow in Medicine (Hematology), ibid., 1958-1960; Instructor in 
Medicine, Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest College since 1959; 
Assistant Dean, ibid., since 1960. 

Lois Johnson, M.A. 

Dean of Women 

B.A., Meredith College, 1915; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1933; Graduate 
Student, Columbia University, 1916; Summer Study in France, 1923; Instructor 
in English, Meredith College, 1917-1919; Instructor in French, ibid., 1923-1924; 
Principal, Thomasville High School, 1934-1942; Associate Professor of French, 
Wake Forest College, 1942-56; Dean of Women, ibid., since 1942. 

Percival Perry, M.A., Ph.D. 

Dean of the Summer Session 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1937; M.A., Rutgers University, 1940; Ph.D., Duke Uni- 
versity, 1947; Graduate Assistant in History, Rutgers University, 1937-39; Grad- 
uate Student, Duke University, 1939-42, 1946-47; University Fellow, ibid., 1941- 
42, 1946; Fellow in Economics, Case Institute of Technology, Summer 1952; Fellow 
in History, Duke University, Summer 1954; Instructor in Social Sciences, Wake 
Forest College, 1939-40; Assistant Professor of Social Sciences, ibid., 1947-52; As- 
sociate Professor of Social Sciences, ibid., 1952-57; Professor of History, ibid., since 
1957; Dean of the Summer Session, ibid., since 1960. 

Henry Smith Stroupe, M.A., Ph.D. 

Director of Graduate Studies 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1935; M.A., ibid., 1937; Ph.D., Duke University, 1942; 
Teaching Fellow in Social Sciences, Wake Forest College, 1935-37; Graduate Stu- 
dent, Duke University, 1937-39; University Fellow, ibid., 1939-40; Visiting Pro- 
fessor of History, ibid., Summer Session, 1960; Instructor in Social Sciences, Wake 
Forest College, 1937-42; Assistant Professor of Social Sciences, ibid., 1942-49; As- 
sociate Professor of Social Sciences, ibid., 1949-54; Professor of Social Sciences, 
ibid., 1954-57; Professor of History, ibid., since 1957; Director of Evening Classes, 
ibid., 1957-61; Director of the Division of Graduate Studies, ibid, since 1961. 

10 



Administration 



Worth H. Copeland, M.A. 

Secretary of The Trustees of Wake Forest College, Treasurer of The 

Trustees of Wake Forest College, Secretary of the Faculty, 

Superintendent of the College Hospital 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1939; M.A., ibid., 1941 ; Teaching Fellow in Mathematics, 
ibid., 1939-41; Instructor in Mathematics, ibid., 1941-47; Assistant Secretary and 
Assistant Bursar, ibid., 1946-52; Acting Bursar, ibid., 1952; Secretary and Bursar, 
ibid., 1952-58; Treasurer, ibid., since 1958; Secretary of the Faculty, ibid., since 
1952; Superintendent of the College Hospital, ibid., since 1954. 



James B. Cook, Jr., M.A., M.B.A. 
Assistant Treasurer 



B.S., Wake Forest College, 1944; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1948; M.B.A., 
Harvard University, 1960; Instructor in Chemistry, Wake Forest College, 1944-46; 
Assistant to the Bursar, ibid., 1947-53; Assistant Bursar, ibid., 1953-58; Executive 
Assistant to the Treasurer, ibid., 1958-60; Assistant Treasurer, ibid., since 1960. 

John G. Williard, B.S., C.P.A. 

Assistant Treasurer 

B.S., University of North Carolina, 1953; Certified Public Accountant, North Caro- 
lina, 1959; General Practice of Accounting, 1955-58; Assistant Treasurer, Wake 
Forest College, since 1958. 

Harry O. Parker, B.S., C.P.A. 

Controller of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

B.S., University of North Carolina, 1930; C.P.A., North Carolina, 1933; Laboratory 
Instructor in Accounting, University of North Carolina, 1929-1930; General Prac- 
tice of Accounting, 1930-1947; Controller of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine 
of Wake Forest College, since 1947. 

Grady S. Patterson, B.A. 
Registrar 
B.A., Wake Forest College, 1924; Registrar, ibid., since 1926. 

Mrs. Margaret R. Perry, B.S. 

Assistant Registrar 

B.S., University of South Carolina, 1945; Instructor in Business Administration, 
ibid., 1944-45; Assistant to the Registrar, Wake Forest College, 1947-49; Assistant 
Registrar, ibid., since 1949. 

William G. Starling, B.B.A. 

Acting Director of Admissions 

B.B.A., Wake Forest College, 1957; Assistant Director of Admissions, ibid., 1958-60; 
Acting Director of Admissions, ibid., since 1960. 

Mrs. Shirley Philbeck Hamrick, B.A. 

Associate Director of Admissions 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 1948; Assistant to the Director of Admissions, 
Wake Forest College, 1957-60; Associate Director of Admissions, ibid., since 1960. 

11 



Administration 



Charles S. Rooks, B.A. 

Assistant Director of Admissions 

B.A.,ijWake Forest College, 1959; Rockefeller Brothers Theological Fellow, Harvard 
University, 1959-1960; Assistant Director of Admissions, Wake Forest College, 
since 1960. 

Eugene I. Olive, B.A., Th.M. 

Director of Alumni Activities 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1910; Th.M., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 
1918; Pastor First Baptist Church, Dunn, N. C, 1918-1921; First Baptist Church, 
Mount Airy, N. C, 1921-1924; Chapel Hill Baptist Church, Chapel Hill, N. C, 
1924-1933; First Baptist Church, North Wilkesboro, N. C, 1933-1940; Wake Forest 
Baptist Church, Wake Forest, N. C, 1940-1947; Chaplain, Wake Forest College, 
1940-1947; Director of Public Relations and Alumni Activities, ibid., 1947-1952; 
Director of Alumni Activities and Associate Director of Public Relations, ibid., 
1952-55; Director of Alumni Activities, ibid., since 1955. 

Russell H. Brantley, Jr., B.A. 

Director of Communications 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1945; City Editor, Concord Tribune, 1945; Telegraph 
Editor, The Durham Sun, 1945-46; City Editor, Durham Morning Herald, 1946-49; 
Associated Press, Charlotte, 1949; Managing Editor, Durham Morning Herald, 
1950-53; Director of News Bureau, Wake Forest College, 1953-58; Director of Com- 
munications, ibid., since 1958. 

Marvin A. Francis 

Director of Sports Publicity 

Wake Forest College, 1942; Member Durham Morning Herald Sports Staff, 1938- 
1942; Assistant Sports Editor, Durham Morning Herald, 1942-1955; Director of 
Sports Publicity, Wake Forest College, since 1955. 

Leon H. Hollingsworth, B.A., D.D. 

Chaplain of the College 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1943; D.D., ibid., 1959; New Orleans Baptist Theological 
Seminary, 1937-39; Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1951-52; Union 
Theological Seminary, Summer 1956; Chaplain, U.S.A., 1943-46; Pastor of First 
Baptist Church, Mebane, N. C, 1946-52; Pastor of First Baptist Church, Boone, 
N. C, 1952-59; Chaplain, Wake Forest College, since 1959. 

*VVilliam Demauth Blanton, B.A., B.D. 

Secretary, Baptist Student Union 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1953; B.D., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, 
1957; Chaplain Intern, State Hosptial, Raleigh, 1956-57; Associate Pastor, Uni- 
versity Baptist Church, Baltimore, Md., 1957-59; Secretary, Baptist Student 
Union, Wake Forest College, since 1959. 

**William W. Shelton, Jr., M.D. 

Director of the Student Health Service 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1951; M.D., Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake 
Forest College, 1955; Intern, North Carolina Baptist Hospital, 1955-56; Resident 
ibid., 1956-59; Private Practice of Medicine, 1959-60; Director of the Student Health 
Service, Wake Forest College, since 1960. 



• Resigned, December 31, 1960. 
*• Died, October 21, 1960. 



12 



Administration 



Carlton P. West, M.A., B.S. in L.S. 

Librarian 

B.A., Boston University, 1926; Jacob Sleeper Fellow, Yale University, 1926-1927; 
Currier Fellow, ibid., 1927-1928; Student, Harvard University, Summer 1937; M.A., 
Yale University, 1942; B.S. in L.S., University of North Carolina, 1946; Instructor 
in Social Sciences, Wake Forest College, 1928-1933; Assistant Professor of Social 
Sciences, ibid., 1933-1945; Librarian, ibid., since 1946. 

Mrs. Vivian Lunsford Wilson, A.B., B.S. in L.S. 

Law Librarian 

A.B., Coker College, 1942; B.S. in L.S., George Peabody College, 1943; Assistant 
Librarian, Mars Hill College, 1942-48; Cataloger, Wake Forest College Library, 
1948-52; Librarian, Roanoke Rapids High School, 1958-60; Law Librarian, Wake 
Forest College, since 1960. 

Jasper L. Memory, Jr., M.A. 

Director of the Placement Bureau 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1921; M.A., Columbia University, 1925; General Educa- 
tion Board Fellow and Graduate Student, Columbia University, 1927-28; State 
Inspector of High Schools, 1925-29; Lecturer in Medical Statistics, Bowman Gray 
School of Medicine, 1950; Professor of Education and Director of the Placement 
Bureau, Wake Forest College, since 1929; Alternate Director of Summer Session, 
ibid., 1949-55; Director of Summer Session, ibid., 1956-60. 



William H. Gibson, M.A. 

Director of Athletics 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1929; M.A., ibid., 1942; Coach, Apex High School, 1929-35; 
Principal, Apex High School, 1935-38; Dean of Boys, Hugh Morson High School, 
Raleigh, 1938-39; Coach, Thomas ville High School, 1939-42; Agent, Federal Bu- 
reau of Investigation, 1942-56; Director of Athletics, Wake Forest College, since 
1956. 



[esse I. Haddock, B.S. 

Assistant Director of Athletics 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1952; Athletic Equipment Manager, ibid., 1952; Inspector, 
North Carolina Division of Purchase and Contract, 1954; Assistant to the Director 
of Athletics, Wake Forest College, 1954-56; Assistant Director of Athletics, ibid., 
since 1956. 



Richard T. Clay, B.B.A. 

Manager of the College Book Store 

B.B.A., Wake Forest College, 1956; Assistant Manager of the College Book Store ; 
ibid., 1956-60; Manager of the College Book Store, ibid., since 1960. 



Harold S. Moore, B.M.E. 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

B.M.E., University of Virginia, 1949; Assistant Superintendent of Buildings and 
Grounds, ibid., 1949-1953; Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, Wake Forest 
College, since 1956. 



13 



Administration 



Royce R. Weatherly 

Assistant Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Licensed Marine Engineer, United States Maritime Commission School, 1942; Coyne 
Electrical School, Chicago, 1945; Assistant to Superintendent of Power Plant, 
North Carolina State College, 1946-47; Assistant Superintendent of Buildings 
and Grounds, Wake Forest College, 1947-53; Acting Superintendent, ibid., 1953- 
1956; Assistant Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, ibid., since 1956. 

Melvin Q. Layton, B.S. 

Assistant Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1947; Coach, E. M. Holt High School, Alamance County, 
North Carolina, 1948-1949; Coach, Chowan College, 1950-1951; Assistant to Di- 
rector of Athletics, Wake Forest College, 1951-1956; Assistant Superintendent of 
Buildings and Grounds, ibid., since 1956. 

Thomas P. Griffin 

Director of Residences 
Director of Residences, Wake Forest College, since 1956. 

Harry F. Smith 

Military Property Custodian 

United States Army, 1920-1954; Chief Warrant Officer, U. S. Army, Retired; Military 
Property Custodian, Wake Forest College, since 1954. 

*Mrs. Ruby M. Sheridan, B.S.H.E. 

Director of Food Services 

B.8.H.E., Woman's College, University of North Carolina, 1940; Tea Room Man- 
ager, Lynchburg, Va., 1940-1942; Food and Recreation Director U. S. Army Special 
Services Division, 1942-1947; Assistant Manager, Charlotte Country Club, 1948; 
Sales and Service Supervisor Men's Dining Halls, Duke University, 1948-1956; 
Director of Food Services at Wake Forest College, since 1956. 



! Resigned, February 1, 1961. 



14 



Emeriti 



Professors Emeriti 

Daniel Bunyan Bryan, M.A., Pd.D. 

Professor Emeritus of Education 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 1911; M.A., Columbia University, 1914; Helen 
Gould Fellow in Education, New York University, 1914-15; Pd.D., ibid., 1916; 
Associate Professor of Education and Sociology, Richmond College, 1915-17; Pro- 
fessor of Education and Psychology, ibid., 1917-19; Professor of Education, Wake 
Forest College, 1921-1957; Dean of the College, ibid., 1923-1957; Professor Emeritus 
of Education, ibid., since 1957. 

Mrs. Ethel T. Crittenden 

Librarian Emerita 

Librarian, Wake Forest College, 1915-1946; Librarian Emerita, ibid., since 1946; 
Director of the Baptist Collections, 1946-1952. 

Willis R. Cullom, M.A., Th.D., D.D. 

Professor Emeritus of the Bible 

M.A., Wake Forest College, 1892; Assistant Professor, Southern Baptist Theologica 
Seminary, 1893-96; Th.D., ibid., 1903; D.D., Richmond College, 1915; Professor 
of the Bible, Wake Forest College, 1896-1938; Acting Dean, ibid., 1922-23; Professor 
Emeritus, ibid., since 1938. 

Hubert A. Jones, M.A., LL.B. 

Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1908; M.A., LL.B., ibid., 1909; Graduate Student,[_Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1910-11; Graduate Student, Columbia University, Summers 
1913, 1916, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924; Instructor in Mathematics, Wake Forest College, 
1908-11; Associate Professor of Mathematics, ibid., 1911-15; Professor of Mathe- 
matics, ibid., 1915-59; Professor Emeritus, ibid,, since 1959. 

Henry Broadus Jones, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1910; M.A., University of Chicago, 1920; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1924; Instructor in Latin, Cullowhee Normal School, 1912-17; 
Head of Department of English, ibid., 1917-20; Professor of English and Head of 
the Department, Simpson College, 1921-24; Professor of English, Wake Forest 
College, 1924-59; Professor Emeritus, ibid., since 1959. 

*William E. Speas, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus of Physics 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1907; Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins University, 
1910-13; Assistant in Physics, ibid., 1911-13; M.A., ibid., 1913; Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago, 1919; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1927; Instructor in Phys- 
ics, Clemson College, 1913-16; Assistant Professor of Physics, ibid., 1916-19; As- 
sociate Professor of Physics, ibid., 1919-20; Associate Professor of Physics, Wake 
Forest College, 1920-29; Professor of Physics, ibid., 1929-59; Professor Emeritus, 
ibid., since 1959. 



* Died, January 24, 1961. 



15 



Faculty 



♦Instruction 

Charles M. Allen, M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1939; M.A., ibid., 1941; Ph.D., Duke University, 1955; 
Teaching Fellow in Biology, ibid., 1939-41; Instructor in Biology, Wake Forest 
College, 1941-46; Assistant Professor of Biology, ibid., 1946-56; Associate Professor 
of Biology, ibid., since 1956. 



William D. Amis, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Swarthmore College. 1949; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1959; Field 
Researcher, Hospital Research Project, Institute for Research in Social Science, 
University of North Carolina, 1951-52; Sociology Representative, Interdiscipli- 
nary Research Seminar, University of North Carolina School of Medicine. 1953-54; 
Instructor in Social Science, University of North Carolina, 1950-51; Assistant 
Professor of Sociology, Georgia State College, 1955-58; Instructor in Sociology, 
Emory University, 1958-59; Visiting Lecturer in Sociology, University of Georgia, 
Summer 1959; Assistant Professor of Sociology, Wake Forest College, since 1959. 



James E. Anderson, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

B.S., Southwest Texas State Teachers College, 1955; Ph.D., University of Texas, 
1960; Instructor in Government, Southwest Texas State Teachers College, 1957, 
Teaching Assistant in Government, University of Texas, 1956-57, 1958-59; Uni- 
versity Fellow, ibid.. 1957-58; Instructor in Political Science, Wake Forest College, 
1959-60; Assistant Professor of Political Science, ibid., since 1960. 



Jerold G. Anderson, M.A. 

Instructor in Spanish and German 



A.B., Florida State University, 1951; M.A., ibid., 1952; Student, Universidad 
Nacional de Mexico, Summer 1956; Instructor in Spanish and German, Wake 
Forest College, since 1958. 



John William Angell, Th.M., S.T.M., Th.D. 

Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1941; Th.M., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 
1945; S.T.M., Andover Newton Theological School, 1948; Th.D., Southern Baptist 
Theological Seminary, 1949; Fellow in Theology, Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary, 1946-47; Pastor of Buie's Creek Baptist Church and Chaplain of Camp- 
bell College, 1949-52; Assistant Professor of Religion, Stetson University, 1952-54; 
Associate Professor of Religion, ibid., 1954-55; Associate Professor of Religion, 
Wake Forest College, since 1955. 



Andrew Lewis Aycock, M.A. 

Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1926; M.A., Tulane University, 1928; Robert Sharpe 
Teaching Fellow, ibid., 1927-28; Graduate Student, Harvard University, Summers 
1929, 1930, 1951; Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins University, 1932-33; Instructor 
in English, Wake Forest College, 1928-31; Assistant Professor of English, ibid., 
1931-1951; Director of Admissions, ibid., 1957-59; Associate Professor of English, 
ibid., since 1951. 



Names are arranged alphabetically. 

16 



Faculty 



*Eugene Pendleton Banks, M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Furman University, 1943; M.A., Harvard University, 1950; Ph.D., ibid., 1954; 
Graduate Student, University of New Mexico, 1946-48; Graduate Student, Uni- 
versity of Michigan, Summer 1949; Research Training Fellow, Social Science 
Research Council, 1950-51; County Director, South Carolina Department of 
Public Welfare, 1951-52; Field Supervisor, Hospital Research Project, Institute 
for Research in Social Science, University of North Carolina, 1952-53; Instructor 
in Sociology and Anthropology, Duke University, 1953-54; Assistant Professor 
of Sociology, Wake Forest College, 1954-57; Associate Professor of Sociology, 
ibid., since 1957. 

Harold M. Barrow, M.A., P.E.D. 

Professor of Physical Education 

A.B., Westminster College, 1936; M.A., University of Missouri, 1942; P.E.D., Uni- 
versity of Indiana, 1953; Graduate Student, University of North Carolina, 1948; 
Director of Athletics, Physical Education and Head Coach, Eureka College, 
1946-48; Assistant Professor of Physical Education, Wake Forest College, 1948- 
1953; Associate Professor of Physical Education, ibid., 1953-57; Professor of Physi- 
cal Education, ibid., since 1957. 

Fleta Joyce Bateman, M.E. 

Instructor in Secretarial Studies, School of Business Administration 

B.S.S.A., The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, 1954; M.E., 
University of North Carolina, 1955; Instructor in Secretarial Studies, School of 
Business Administration, Wake Forest College, since 1955. 

Robert Clarence Beck, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1953; Ph.D., ibid., 1958; U. S. Public Health Service 
Postdoctoral Fellow, ibid., 1957-59; Assistant Professor of Psychology, Wake 
Forest College, since 1959. 

Charles S. Black, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1918; M.A., ibid., 1920; M.A., University of Virginia, 1923; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1928; Instructor in Chemistry, Wake Forest 
College, 1919-20; Instructor in Chemistry, University of Virginia, 1920-23; As- 
sistant Professor of Chemistry, Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
1923-25; Research Fellow, University of Wisconsin, 1927-28; Assistant Professor of 
Chemistry, Wake Forest College, 1925-28; Associate Professor of Chemistry, ibid., 
1928-29; Professor of Chemistry, ibid., since 1929. 

James Carey Blalock, M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1934; M.A., ibid., 1937; Ph.D., University of Florida, 
1950; Teaching Fellow in Chemistry, Wake Forest College, 1935-37; Instructor 
in Chemistry, ibid., 1946-47; Instructor in Chemistry, University of Florida, 
1947-50; Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Wake Forest College, 1950-57; Associate 
Professor of Chemistry, ibid., since 1957. 

Lester B. Bonner 

Master Sergeant, U. S. Army; Assistant in Instruction in Military 

Science and Tactics 

Assistant in Instruction in Military Science and Tactics, Wake Forest College 
since 1958. 



• Absent on leave, 1960-61. 

17 



Faculty 

Ora C. Bradbury, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Biology 

B.S., Ottawa University, 1914; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1915; Ph.D., ibid., 
1919; Assistant Professor of Zoology, Baylor University, 1917-18; Professor of Zo- 
ology, ibid., 1918-23; Assistant Professor of Zoology, University of Denver, 1923-25; 
Professor of Biology, Wake Forest College, since 1925. 



Robert W. Brehme, M.S., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., Roanoke College, 1951; M.S., University of North Carolina, 1954; Ph.D., 
ibid., 1959; Teaching Fellow, ibid., 1951-53; Graduate Assistant, ibid., 1953-54; 
Instructor in Mathematics, University of Maryland, Fall 1956; International 
Nickel Fellow, University of North Carolina, 1957-58; Research Assistant, ibid., 
1958-59; Assistant Professor of Physics, Wake Forest College, since 1959. 



Ernst Breisacher, Ph.D. 

Visiting Professor of German 

Graduate, University of Strasbourg, 1915; Ph.D., ibid., 1918; Honorary Research 
Fellow, Yale University, 1940-41 ; Instructor in History and Languages, Dun- 
barton College, 1941-42; Visiting Professor of Area and Language, Kenyon Col- 
lege, 1943-44; Assistant Professor of History and Political Science, Champlain 
College, 1946-48; Associate Professor, ibid., 1948-53; Assistant Professor of French 
and German, Guilford College, 1953-54; Acting Head and Lecturer in German, 
Woman's College, University of North Carolina, 1954-60; Visiting Professor of 
German, Wake Forest College, 1960-61. 



H. Grady Britt, M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1936; M.A., ibid., 1938; Ph.D., University of Virginia, 
1944; Teaching Fellow in Biology, Wake Forest College, 1936-38; Senior duPont 
Fellow in Biology, University of Virginia, 1940; Senior duPont Research Fellow 
in Biology, ibid., 1942-44; Instructor in Biology, Wake Forest College, 1938-40: 
Assistant Professor of Biology, Mary Washington College of the University of 
Virginia, 1944-47; Visiting Professor of Zoology at University of North Carolina, 
Summers, 1946-47; Assistant Professor of Biology, Wake Forest College, 1947-62; 
Associate Professor of Biology, ibid., since 1952. 



John C. Broderick, A.M., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Southwestern (Memphis), 1948; A.M., University of North Carolina, 1949; 
Ph.D., ibid,. 1953; Part-time Instructor of English, ibid., 1949-52; Instructor in 
English, University of Texas, 1952-56; Special Instructor in English, ibid., 1956-57; 
Visiting Professor of English, University of Virginia, Summer 1959; Assistant 
Professor of English, Wake Forest College, 1957-58, Associate Professor of English, 
ibid., since 1958. 



Dalma Adolph Brown, M.A. 

Associate Professor of English 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 1924; M.A., ibid., 1932; Teaching Fellow in Eng- 
lish, ibid., 1927-28; Graduate Student and Part-time Instructor in English, ibid., 
1931-36, 1938-41 ; Instructor in English, University of Mississippi, 1928-31; Instructor 
in English, Tulane University, 1936-37; Assistant Professor of English, The Cita- 
del, 1937-38; Instructor in English, Wake Forest College, 1941-45; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of English, 1945-1956; Associate Professor of English, ibid., since 1956. 

18 



Faculty 



George McLeod Bryan, M.A., B.D., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1941; M.A., Wake Forest College, 1944; B.D., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1947; Ph.D., Yale University, 1951; Instructor, Mars Hill College, 1943 and 
1947; Professor of Philosophy and Christian Ethics, Mercer University, 1949-1956; 
Post-graduate Study, Princeton University, Summer of 1952; European Human 
Relations Seminar, Summer 1954; Dean of International Relations Seminar, 
Davidson College, Summer of 1956; Visiting Professor of Philosophy, Washington 
University, spring semester, 1957; Associate Professor of Religion, Wake Forest 
College, since 1956. 

Julian C. Burroughs, Jr., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Speech 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1951; M.A., University of Michigan, 1955; Ph.D., ibid., 
1960; Teaching Fellow in Speech, ibid., 1955-57; Instructor in Speech, ibid., 1957-58; 
Instructor in Speech, Wake Forest College, 1958-60; Assistant Professor of Speech, 
ibid., since 1960. 



Dorothy Casey, M.A. 

Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., Woman's College, University of North Carolina, 1948; M.A., University of 
North Carolina, 1951; Graduate Assistant in Physical Education, University of 
North Carolina, 1948-49; Graduate Student, University of North Carolina, Sum- 
mer, 1950; Instructor in Physical Education, Wake Forest College, since 1949. 

Changboh Chee, M.A. Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Chosun Christian University, Seoul, Korea, 1948; B.A., North Central Col- 
lege, 1955; M.A., Duke University, 1956; Ph.D., ibid., 1959: Graduate Student and 
Assistant, ibid., 1955-58; Instructor in Sociology, Wake Forest College, 1959-60; 
Assistant Professor of Sociology, ibid., since 1960. 

Forrest W. Clonts, M.A. 

Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1920; M.A., Ohio State University, 1921; Currier Fellow 
in History, Yale University, 1921-22; Instructor in History, Wake Forest College, 
1922-24; Fellow in History, Yale University, 1924-25; Assistant Professor of Social 
Sciences, Wake Forest College, 1925-45; Associate Professor of Social Sciences, 
ibid., 1945-1957; Associate Professor of History, ibid., since 1957. 

Elton C. Cocke, M.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Biology 

B.S., University of Virginia, 1927; M.S., ibid., 1928; Ph.D., ibid., 1931; Professor of 
Botany, State Teachers College, East Radford, Va., 1928-30; Instructor in Biology, 
University of Virginia, 1931-38; Assistant Professor of Biology, Wake Forest Col- 
lege, 1938-43; Associate Professor of Biology, ibid., 1943-52; Professor of Biology, 
ibid., since 1952. 

Leon P. Cook, Jr., M.S., C.P.A. 

Associate Professor oj Accounting, School of Business Administration 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1949; M.S., The University of Tennessee, 1951 ; 
C.P.A. , Arkansas, 1955; Instructor in Accounting, University of Arkansas, 1951- 
55; Teaching Fellow in Accounting, University of Alabama, 1955-57; Associate 
Professor of Accounting, School of Business Administration, Wake Forest College, 
since 1957. 

19 



Faculty 

Marjorie Crisp, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Appalachian State Teachers College, 1934; M.A., George Peabody College, 
1944; Graduate Student, University of Southern California, Summer, 1954; Direc- 
tor of Physical Education for Women, Gardner- Webb College, 1935-1941; Instruc- 
tor* in Physical Education, Western Carolina Teachers College, Summers 1939 
and 1940; Director of Physical Education for Women, Louisburg College, 1941- 
1947; Instructor in Physical Education, East Carolina Teachers College, Summer, 
1947; Instructor in Physical Education, Wake Forest College, 1947-50; Assistant 
Director, Physical Education for Women, ibid., 1950-56; Assistant Professor of 
Physical Education, ibid., since 1956. 

John Frederick Dashiell, M.A., Ph.D., Sc.D. 

Visiting Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Evansville College, 1908; B.Litt., ibid., 1909; M.A., Columbia University, 
1910; Ph.D., ibid., 1913; Sc.D., Evansville College, 1949; Assistant in Philosophy, 
Columbia University, 1910-13; Professor of Education and Zoology, Waynesburg 
College, 1913-14; Instructor in Philosophy, Princeton University, 1914-15; In- 
structor in Psychology, University of Minnesota, 1915-17; Assistant Professor of 
Psychology, Oberlin College, 1917-19; Visiting Professor of Psychology, Uni- 
versity of California at Los Angeles, 1949-50; Visiting Professor of Psychology, 
University of Florida, 1950; Part-Time Professor of Psychology, Duke University, 
1956-57; Associate Professor of Psychology, University of North Carolina, 1919-20; 
Professor of Psychology, ibid., 1920-35; Kenan Professor of Psychology, ibid., 
1935-58; Kenan Professor Emeritus, ibid., since 1958; Whitney Visiting Professor 
of Psychology, Wake Forest College, 1958-59; Visiting Professor of Psychology, 
ibid., since 1959. 

Billy James Davis, M.A. 

Instructor in English 

B.A., University of Texas, 1952; M.A., ibid., 1954; Teaching Assistant, ibid., 1952-57; 
Special Instructor, ibid., 1957-58; Instructor in English, Wake Forest College, 
since 1958. 



John Edward Davis, Jr., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., University of Virginia, 1948; M.A., ibid., 1950; Ph.D., ibid., 1955; Instructor 
in Biology, Washington and Lee University, 1949-51, 1954-56; Visiting Professor 
of Biology, College of William and Mary, Norfolk Division, Summer, 1955; As- 
sistant Professor of Biology, Wake Forest College, since 1956. 

Marcel E. Delgado, Th.M. 

Instructor in Spanish 

B.A., Carson-Newman College, 1940; Th.M., Southern Baptist Theological Semi- 
nary, 1943; Student, Institute Santa Clara, Cuba, 1933-35; Graduate Student, 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 1944-47; Graduate Student, University 
of Havana, Summers of 1943, 1946, 1947; Graduate Student, Duke University, 
Summer, 1949; Instructor in Spanish, Rugby University School, 1941-44; In- 
structor in Spanish, Indiana University (Jeffersonville Branch), 1944-47; Instruc- 
tor in Spanish, Wake Forest College, since 1947. 

Paul C. Dillon, B.S. 

Major, Artillery, U. S. Army; Assistant Professor of Military 

Science and Tactics 

B.S., Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas, 1940; Assistant Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics, Wake Forest College, since 1958. 



20 



Faculty 



Hugh William Divine, M.A., J.D., LL.M., S.J.D. 

Professor of Law 

B.S., Georgia State College for Men, 1932; M.A., Louisiana State University, 1941 ; 
J. D., Emory University, 1950; LL.M., University of Michigan, 1952; S. J. D., ibid. 
1959; Assistant Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, 1946-1951; Research 
and Teaching Assistant, College of Law, Ohio State University, 1952-1953; Re- 
search Associate, College of Law, University of Notre Dame, 1953-1954; Assistant 
Professor of Law, Wake Forest College, 1954-1956; Associate Professor of Law, ibid., 
1956-1959; Professor of Law, ibid., since 1959. 

N. Taylor Dodson, M.A., P.E.D. 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., University of North Carolina, 1947; M.A., ibid., 1948; Dir. P. E.Jndiana Uni- 
versity, 1950; P.E.D. , ibid., 1955; Graduate Assistant and Assistant Intramural 
Director, University of North Carolina, 1947-48; Graduate Assistant, Indiana 
University, 1948-50; Adviser in Physical Education, North Carolina State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction, 1950-57; Associate Professor of Physical Education. 
Wake Forest College, since 1957. 

Clyde H. Dornbusch, M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., DePauw University, 1953; M.A., Duke University, 1955; Ph.D., ibid., 1957; 
University Fellow in English, ibid., 1953-55; Instructor in English, Wake Forest 
College, 1957-58; Assistant Professor of English, ibid., since 1958. 

Justus C. Drake, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1936; M.A., ibid., 1942; Teaching Fellow, 1940-42; Gradu- 
ate Student, Duke University, 1950-52, 1955-56; Instructor in English, North 
Carolina State College, 1942-46; Instructor in English, Wake Forest College, 
1946-1956; Assistant Professor of English, ibid., since 1956. 

Robert Allen Dyer, Th.M., Th.D. 

Associate Professor of Religion and Assistant Dean 
(See Administration.) 

Cronje B. Earp, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Classical Languages and Literature 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1926; Special University Fellow in Greek and Latin, 
Columbia University, 1926-27; M.A., Columbia University, 1927; Ph.D., ibid., 
1939; Instructor in Latin, Long Island University, 1927-28; Instructor in Classics, 
Washington Square College, New York University, 1928-29; Instructor in Greek 
and Latin, Saint Stephen's College (now Bard College), Columbia University, 
1929-31 ; Associate Professor of the Greek Language and Literature, Wake Forest 
College, 1940-42; Professor of the Greek Language and Literature, ibid., 1942- 
1956; Professor of Classical Languages and Literature, ibid., since 1956. 

J. Allen Easley, Th.M., D.D. 
Professor of Religion 

B.A., Furman University, 1914; Graduate Student, Harvard University, 1914-15; 
Th.M., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1918; D.D., Furman University, 
1934; Graduate Student, Columbia University, Summer 1939; Chaplain, U.S.A., 
1918-19; Pastor of Glasgow Baptist Church, Glasgow, Ky., 1923-28; Pastor of Wake 
Forest Baptist Church and Chaplain of Wake Forest College, 1928-38; Acting 
Dean of the School of Religion, ibid., 1950-58; Acting Chaplain, ibid., 1958-59; 
Professor of Religion, ibid., since 1938. 



21 



Faculty 



Richard Bozman Eaton, Jr., M.A. 

Instructor in English 

B.A., University of Richmond, 1953; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1955; In- 
structor in English, Winthrop College, 1955-56; Part-time Instructor in English, 
University of North Carolina, 1956-60; Instructor in English, Wake Forest Col- 
lege, 1960-61. 

Leo Ellison, Jr., M.S. 

Instructor in Physical Education; Swimming Coach 

B.S., Northwestern State College, 1956; M.S., ibid., 1957; Graduate Assistant in 
Physical Education, ibid., 1956-57; Instructor in Physical Education and Swim- 
ming Coach, Wake Forest College, since 1957. 

Esron McGruder Faris, Jr., B.S., LL.B., LL.M. 

Associate Professor of Law 

B.S., Washington and Lee University, 1949; LL.B., ibid., 1951; LL.M., Duke Uni- 
versity, 1954; Law Librarian, Washington and Lee University, 1951-52; Assistant 
Professor of Law and Law Librarian, ibid., 1952-57; Visiting Professor of Law, 
ibid., Summer Session 1959; Associate Professor of Law, Wake Forest College, 
since 1957. 

Edgar Estes Folk, M.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of English 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1921; M.S., Columbia University, 1931; Ph.D., George 
Peabody College, 1934; Sometime member of Editorial Staffs of Nashville Tennes- 
sean, Mobile Register, Norfolk Virginian-Pilot, Newark Ledger, The New York 
Herald; Professor of Journalism, Mercer University, 1924-28; Professor of English, 
Oklahoma Baptist University, 1930-36; Assistant Professor of English, Wake 
Forest College, 1936-37; Associate Professor of English, ibid., 1937-52; Professor 
of English, ibid., since 1952. 

Roland L. Gay, M.S. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1928; M.S., North Carolina State College, 1931; Graduate 
Student, Duke University Summer Session, 1937; Instructor in Mathematics, 
Wake Forest College, 1933-45; Assistant Professor of Mathematics, ibid., 1945- 
1956; Associate Professor of Mathematics, ibid., since 1956. 

Ivey C. Gentry, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1940; B.S., in Meteorology, New York University, 1943; 
M.A., Duke University, 1947; Ph.D., ibid., 1949; Graduate Assistant in Mathe- 
matics, ibid., 1946-47; University Fellow in Mathematics, ibid., 1947-49; Assistant 
Professor of Mathematics, Wake Forest College, 1949-52; Associate Professor of 
Mathematics, ibid., 1952-57; Professor of Mathematics, ibid., since 1957. 

C. N. Giles, Jr., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S., Florida Southern College, 1948; M.A., George Peabody College, 1952; Theory 
study with Alice Hunt Sokoloff, Piano study with Robert Carter, Johanna Harris; 
Piano study with Ernesto Berumen, New York City, 1957-58; Instructor in Piano 
and Theory, Bethel College, 1948-51 ; Instructor in Music, Wake Forest College, 
1951-59; Assistant Professor of Music, ibid., since 1959. 

Clifford E. Girndt 

Sergeant, U. S. Army; Assistant in Military Science and Tactics 

Carthage College, 1939-40; Assistant in Military Science and Tactics, Wake Forest 
College, since 1956. 

22 



Faculty 



Balkrishna Govind Gokhale, M.A., Ph.D. 

Visiting Professor of History and Asian Studies 

B.A., University of Bombay, India, 1939; M.A., ibid., 1941; Ph.D., ibid., 1946; Lec- 
turer and Assistant Professor of Pali and History, St. Xavier's College, Bombay, 
1942-54; Visiting Lecturer in Indian History and Civilization, Bowdoin College, 
1954-55; Visiting Associate Professor of Indian and Southeast Asian History and 
Civilization, Oberlin College, 1955-56; Professor and Head of the Department of 
History and Indian Civilization, Siddharth College, Bombay, 1956-59; Visiting 
Lecturer in Indian History and Civilization, University of Washington, 1959-60; 
Visiting Professor of History and Director of Asian Studies, Wake Forest College, 
1960-61. 

Robert W. Gregg, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

B.A., Colgate University, 1951; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1956; Graduate Instruc- 
tor, ibid., 1952-56; Assistant Professor of Political Science, Wake Forest College, 
since 1959. 

Robert G. Gregory, M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles, 1948; M.A., ibid., 1950; Ph.D., ibid'. 
1957; Graduate Student, University of London, 1953-54; Fellow of the Ford Foun- 
dation, Europe and East Africa, 1955-56; Assistant Professor of History, Wake 
Forest College, since 1957. 

George J. Griffin, Th.B., B.D., Ph.D. 

Professor of Religion 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1935; Th.B., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 
1937; B.D., Yale University, 1938; Ph.D., Edinburgh University, 1948; Pastor, 
Zebulon Baptist Church, 1938-46; Graduate Student, Columbia University, Sum- 
mer 1940; Graduate Student, Oxford University, 1947; Associate Professor of Re- 
ligion, Wake Forest College, 1948-56; Professor of Religion, ibid., since 1956. 

Paul M. Gross, Jr., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Duke University, 1941; Ph.D., Brown University, 1948; Graduate Student, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1941-42; Special Research Assistant, 
Department of Physical Chemistry, Harvard Medical School, 1942-46; Instructor 
in Chemistry, University of Virginia, 1948-51; Assistant Professor of Chemistry, 
ibid., 1951-59; Research Participant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Summer 
1949; National Science Foundation Science Faculty Fellow, Cambridge Uni- 
versity, 1957-58; Associate Professor of Chemistry, Wake Forest College, since 
1959. 

Emmett Willard Hamrick, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Religion 

A.B., University of North Carolina, 1946; Ph.D., Duke University, 1951; Gurney 
Harriss Kearns Fellow in Religion, ibid., 1949-51; Fellow of the American Schools 
of Oriental Research, Jerusalem, 1951-52; Instructor in Religion, Wake Forest Col- 
lege, 1952-53; Assistant Professor of Religion, ibid., 1953-54; Associate Professor of 
Religion, ibid., since 1954. 

Phillip J. Hamrick, Jr., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Morris Harvey College, 1952; Ph.D., Duke University, 1956; Teaching Assist- 
ant in Chemistry, ibid., 1952-54; Carbide and Carbon Chemicals Company Fellow 
in Chemistry, ibid., 1954-56; Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Wake Forest Col- 
lege, since 1956. 

23 



Faculty 

Carl V. Harris, S.T.M., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Classical Languages and Literature 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1944; B.D., Yale University, 1946; S.T.M., ibid., 1947; 
Ph.D., Duke University, 1952; Instructor in Religion and Greek, Mars Hill Col- 
lege, 1947-50; Assistant Professor of Religion and Director of Religious Activities, 
East Carolina College, 1953-54; Associate Professor of Religion and Greek, Uni- 
versity of Dubuque, 1954-56; Assistant Professor of Classical Languages and 
Literature, Wake Forest College, 1956-59; Associate Professor of Classical Lan- 
guages and Literature, ibid., since 1959. 

William Oliver Harris, M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1950; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1952; Ph.D., 
ibid., 1957; Graduate Instructor in English, ibid., 1955; Instructor in English, 
University of Maryland, 1955-57; Instructor in English, Wake Forest College, 
1957-58; Assistant Professor of English, ibid., since 1958. 

Emerson W. Head, B.M. 

Instructor in Music 

B.M., University of Michigan, 1957; Associate Instructor in Brass Instruments 
Jacksonville University, 1957-59; Conductor of Youth Symphony, 1st Trumpet 
and Assistant Conductor, Jacksonville Symphony, Jacksonville, Florida, 1958-59; 
Instructor in Trumpet and Staff Conductor, Brevard Music Center, 1956-57; 
Instructor in Music, Wake Forest College, since 1959. 

Ralph Cyrus Heath, M.B.A., D.B.A. 

Professor of Marketing, School of Business Administration 

A.B., Princeton University, 1931; M.B.A., Indiana University, 1948; D.B.A. , Indiana 
University, 1954; Assistant Professor of Marketing, Miami University, 1948-1951; 
Assistant Professor of Transportation, University of Washington, 1953-1954; 
Associate Professor of Marketing, School of Business Administration, Wake 
Forest College, 1954-59; Professor of Marketing, ibid., since 1959. 

Robert Meredith Helm, Jr., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1939; M.A., Duke University, 1940; Fellow, Duke Uni- 
versity, 1947; Ph.D., ibid., 1950; Graduate, Personnel Consultants' Course, The 
Adjutant General's School, 1942; Instructor in Philosophy, Wake Forest College, 
1940-41; Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Psychology, ibid., 1947-55; As- 
sociate Professor of Philosophy and Psychology, ibid., 1955-58; Associate Professor 
of Philosophy, ibid., since 1958. 

Owen F. Herring, M.A., Th.M., Th.D., D.D. 

Professor of Religion 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1913; M.A., ibid., 1914; Th.M., Southern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary. 1922; Th.D., ibid., 1924; D.D., Georgetown College, Ky., 1949; 
Pastor, First Baptist Church, Maysville, Ky., 1924-27; Pastor, First Baptist 
Church, Winchester, Ky., 1928-39; Pastor, Watts Street Baptist Church, Durham, 
1939-46; Student, Duke University Divinity School, Summer 1946; Student, 
Union Theological Seminary, Summer 1949; Professor of Religion, Wake Forest 
College, since 1946. 

David Allen Hills, M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology and Assistant Director of the 

Center for Psychological Services 

A.B., University of Kansas, 1953; MA., State University of Iowa, 1959; Ph.D., 
ibid., 1960; Director of the Center for Psychological Services and Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Psychology, Wake Forest College, 1960-61. 

24 



Faculty 



*Keith A. Hitchins, A.M. 

Instructor in History 

A.B., Union College, 1952; A.M., Harvard University, 1953; Graduate Student, 
Harvard University, 1953-55, 1956-57; Ford Foundation Fellow in France and 
Austria, 1955-56, Fulbright Scholar, University of Paris, 1957-58; Instructor in 
History, Wake Forest College, since 1958. 

G. E. Hooks, M.Ed., Ed.D. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1950; M.Ed., University of North Carolina, 1952; Ed.D., 
George Peabody College, 1957; Graduate Assistant in Physical Education, Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, 1951-52; Graduate Assistant in Physical Education, 
George Peabody College, 1955-56; Instructor in Physical Education, North Caro- 
lina State College, 1952-53; Instructor in Physical Education and Baseball Coach, 
Wake Forest College, 1956-57; Baseball Coach, ibid., 1957-59; Assistant Professor 
of Physical Education, ibid., since 1957. 

*Robert R. Howren, Jr., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1950; M.A., University of Connecticut, 1952; Ph.D.. 
Indiana University, 1958; Part-time Instructor, University of Connecticut, 1950- 
52; Teaching Associate, Indiana University, 1955-56; University Fellow, ibid., 
1955-56; Instructor in English, Wake Forest College, 1956-58; Assistant Professor 
of English, ibid., since 1958. 

Delmer P. Hylton, M.B.A., C.P.A. 

Professor of Accounting, School of Business Administration 

B.S., Indiana University, 1942; M.B.A., ibid., 1949; C.P.A. , Indiana, 1949; Gradu- 
ate Instructor in Accounting, Indiana University, 1946-47; Special Agent, Treas- 
ury Department, 1948-49; C.P.A., North Carolina, 1950; Assistant Professor of 
Business Administration, Wake Forest College, 1949-51; Associate Professor of 
Business Administration, ibid., 1951-53; Associate Professor of Accounting, ibid., 
1953-54; Professor of Accounting, School of Business Administration, ibid., since 
1954. 

Robert Nevill Isbell, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., William Jewell College, 1923; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1931; Graduate 
Assistant, Yale University, 1924-26; Instructor in Chemistry, Connecticut College 
of Pharmacy, 1925-26; Instructor in Chemistry, Wake Forest College, 1926-28; 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry, ibid., 1928-31; Honorary Fellow, University of 
Wisconsin, 1930-31; Associate Professor of Chemistry, Wake Forest College, 1931- 
41; USAF Chemical and Atomic Program, 1941-56; Lecturer in Chemistry, Wake 
Forest College, 1957-58; Associate Professor of Chemistry, ibid., since 1958. 

J. Robert Johnson, Jr., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1954; M.A., Duke University, 1956; Ph.D., ibid., 1957; 
Graduate Assistant in Mathematics, ibid., 1954-57; Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics, Wake Forest College, since 1957. 

David W. Johnston, M.S., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., University of Georgia, 1949; M.S., ibid., 1950; Ph.D., University of California 
at Berkeley, 1954; Fellow in Zoology, University of Georgia, 1949-50; Museum 
Technician, Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California at Berkeley, 
1953-1954; Southern Fellowships Fund Research Recipient, Summer, 1956; 
National Science Foundation Research Recipient, 1957-1959; Associate Professor 
of Biology, Mercer University, 1954-1958; Professor of Biology, ibid., 1958-1959; 
Assistant Professor of Biology, Wake Forest College, since 1959. 

* Absent on leave, 1960-61. 

25 



Faculty 



Edgar VV. Jordan, M.Ed. 

Instructor in Physical Education; Track Coach 

B.A., University of Richmond, 1953; M.Ed., University of North Carolina, 1954; 
Graduate Assistant in Physical Education, University of North Carolina, 1953-54; 
Instructor in Physical Education and Assistant Track Coach, North Carolina 
State College, 1954-55; Track Coach and Instructor in Physical Education, Wake 
Forest College, since 1955. 

Frank Butler Josserand, M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Baylor University, 1948; M.A., ibid., 1953; Ph.D., University of Texas, 1957; 
Graduate Student, University of Zurich, Switzerland, 1950; Fulbright Scholar, 
University of Heidelberg, Germany, 1955-56; University Fellow, University of 
Texas, 1956-57; Teaching Assistant, ibid., 1953-55, 1957; Assistant Professor of His- 
tory, Wake Forest College, since 1957. 

Roy Jumper, M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

A.B., M. A., University of South Carolina, 1949; Ph.D., Duke University, 1955! 
Fulbright Scholar, University of Paris, 1953-1954; Ford Foundation Fellow, 
1954-1956; Instructor in History and Political Science, Clemson College, 1949- 
1951 ; Instructor in Political Science, Duke University, 1951-1952; Visiting Lecturer 
in Political Science, National School of Administration of Viet Nam, 1955-1956; 
Fellow, Harvard University, 1959-60; Assistant Professor of Social Sciences, 
Wake Forest College, 1956-57; Assistant Professor of Political Science, ibid., 1957- 
60; Associate Professor of Political Science, ibid., since 1960. 

Alonzo W. Kenion, M.A. 

Instructor in English 

A.B., Duke University, 1942; M.A., ibid., 1950; Instructor in English, Southern 
Methodist University, 1951-55; Graduate Student, Duke University, 1955-56; 
Instructor in English, Wake Forest College, since 1956. 

Harry Lee King, Jr., M.A. 

Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.A., University of Richmond, 1936; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1953; In- 
structor in Spanish, Hampden-Sydney College, 1946-47; Instructor in Spanish, 
University of North Carolina, 1947-52, 1957-59; Instructor in Spanish, University 
of Richmond, 1953-57; Instructor in Spanish, University of North Carolina, 1959- 
60; Instructor in Romance Languages, Wake Forest College, 1960-61. 

Robert E. Lee, M.A., LL.B., LL.M., S.J.D. 

Professor of Law 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1928; LL.B., ibid., 1928; M.A., in Public Law, Columbia 
University, 1929; LL.M., Duke University, 1935; S.J.D., ibid., 1941; Graduate 
Student, New York University, 1928-29; University of Pennsylvania, 1930-31; In- 
structor in Law, Temple University, 1929-38; Assistant Professor, ibid., 1938-42; 
Professor of Law, ibid., 1942-45; Professor of Law, U. S. Army University at Shri- 
venham, England, 1945-46; Visiting Professor of Law, University of Florida, 
Summer of 1948; Dean of the School of Law, Wake Forest College, 1946-50; Chief 
Counsel, Office of Price Stabilization, Region Four, 1951-52; Professor of Law, 
Wake Forest College, since 1946. 

Oscar J. Lewis, M.B.A., C.P.A. 

Associate Professor of Accounting, School of Business Administration 

B.A., Baylor University, 1945; M.B.A., University of Mississippi, 1951; C.P.A. , 
Tennessee, 1950; Instructor of Accounting, Georgia Institute of Technology, 
1949-1950; Auditor and Budget Accountant, Sandia Corporation, 1951-1956; 
Assistant Professor of Accounting, Wake Forest College, 1956-57; Associate Pro- 
fessor of Accounting, School of Business Administration, ibid., since 1957. 

26 



Faculty 



James C. McDonald, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., Washington University, St. Louis, 1952; M.A., University of Missouri, 1957; 
Ph.D., ibid., 1960; Assistant Professor of Biology, Wake Forest College, 1960-61. 

Thane McDonald, Mus.M., Ed.D. 

Professor of Music 

Mus.B., University of Michigan, 1934; Mus.M., ibid., 1935; Ed.D., Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1956; Assistant Instructor in Theory, University of Michi- 
gan, 1935-36; Organ Study with Van Denman Thompson, DePauw University, 
1929-31; Instructor in Organ, Piano, Theory and Glee Club, Davidson College, 
1936-41; Director of Music, Wake Forest College, since 1941; Professor of Music, 
ibid., since 1956. 

Jasper L. Memory, Jr., M.A. 

Professor of Education and Director of Placement Bureau 
(See Administration.) 

Harry B. Miller, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of North Carolina, 1936; Ph.D., ibid., 1946; Instructor in Chemistry. 
Armstrong Junior College, 1945-47: Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Wake 
Forest College, 1947-1951; Associate Professor of Chemistry, ibid., since 1951. 

Harry W. Miller, B.A. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

B.A., University of Cincinnati, 1957; Graduate Student, University of Colorado, 
Summer 1958; Graduate Student, University of Michigan, 1960; Instructor in 
Mathematics, Wake Forest College, 1960-61. 

Daniel C. Mooney 

Master Sergeant, U. S. Army; Assistant in Military Science and 
Tactics 
Assistant in Military Science and Tactics, Wake Forest College, since 1956. 

Thomas E. Mullen, M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Rollins College, 1950; M.A., Emory University, 1951; Ph.D., ibid., 1959; Grad- 
uate Assistant, ibid., 1950-53; Fulbright Scholar, University of London, 1955-56; 
Teaching Assistant, Emory University, 1956-57; Instructor in History, Wake 
Forest College, 1957-59; Assistant Professor of History, ibid., since 1950. 

D. Timothy Murphy, B.D. 

Instructor in Philosophy 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1950; B.D., Yale University, 1953; Fulbright Grant, 
Heidelberg, 1953-1954; Doctor-Candidate, ibid., 1955-56; Instructor, English 
and World Literature, Overseas Extension Program, 1955-56; Stipendium, 
Deutsche-Stifierrerband, 1957; Instructor in Philosophy and Psychology, Wake 
Forest College, 1957-58; Instructor in Philosophy, tbid., since 1958. 

John W. Nowell, Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1940; Teaching Fellow, University of North Carolina, 
1942-43; duPont Fellow in Chemistry, ibid., 1943-44; Ph.D., ibid., 1945; Guest 
Research Student, Institute for Nuclear Studies, University of Chicago, Summer 
1948; Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Wake Forest College, 1945-48; Associate 
Professor of Chemistry, ibid., 1948-54; Assistant Dean ibid., 1957-59; Professor 
of Chemistry, ibid., since 1954. 

27 



Faculty 

*James C. O'Flaherty, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of German 

B.A., Georgetown College, 1939; M.A., University of Kentucky, 1941; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1950; Ferienkurs, University of Heidelberg, 1935; Sommerse- 
mester, ibid., 1936 ; Instructor, Georgetown College, 1939-41 ; Fellow of the American 
Philosophical Society in Germany and Austria, Summer 1958; Instructor in 
German, Wake Forest College, 1947-51; Assistant Professor of German, ibid., 
1951-53; Associate Professor of German, ibid., 1953-58; Professor of German, ibid., 
since 1958. 

Jeanne Owen, M.C.S., J.D. 

Associate Professor of Business Law, School of Business Ad- 
ministration; Director of Evening Classes 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, 1941; M.C.S., Indiana 
University, 1945; J.D., University of North Carolina, 1954; Graduate Student, 
University of Colorado, Summers 1947, 1950; Instructor in Business, Louisburg 
College, 1943-44; Instructor in Commerce, Averett College, 1945-47; Instructor in 
Business Administration, Marshall College, 1947-50; Assistant Professor of Busi- 
ness Administration, ibid., 1950-52; Associate Professor of Business Administra- 
tion, ibid., 1954-56; Assistant Professor of Business Law, School of Business Ad- 
ministration, Wake Forest College, 1956-58; Associate Professor oi Business Law, 
ibid., since 1958; Director of Evening Classes, since 1961. 

Robert E. Pace, M.A. 

Instructor in Sociology 

A.B., College of William and Mary, 1949; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1951; 
Field Research Assistant, Institute for Research in Social Science, University of 
North Carolina, 1951-53; Graduate Student, University of Chicago, 1955-56; 
Graduate Student, University of North Carolina, 1958-60; Instructor in Soci- 
ology, Wake Forest College, 1960-61. 

Harold Dawes Parcell, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of French 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 1923; M.A., Harvard University, 1924; Ph.D., 
Harvard University, 1934; Instructor in French and Spanish, Georgia School of 
Technology, 1924-26; Instructor in French, Harvard University, 1926-28, 1932-34, 
and Summer Session, 1934; Instructor in Romance Languages, Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, 1928-31; Assistant Professor of Romance Languages, ibid., 1931-32; Pro- 
fessor of French and Head of the Department, State Teachers College, Troy, 
Alabama, January- August 1935; Instructor in French, Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, Summer Sessions 1927, 1928, 1929, 1931; Instructor in French, Uni- 
versity of Virginia, Summer Session, 1941 ; Instructor in French, Biarritz American 
University, 1945-46; Assistant Professor of French, Wake Forest College, 1935-38; 
Associate Professor of French, ibid., 1938-46; Professor of French, ibid., since 1946. 

John Ernest Parker, Jr., A.M., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1940; A.M., Syracuse University, 1942; Ph.D., ibid., 
1952; Graduate Assistant in French, ibid., 1940-42; Instructor in French, ibid., 
1946-50; Instructor in Romance Languages, Wake Forest College, 1950-52; Assist- 
ant Professor of Romance Languages, ibid., 1952-56; Associate Professor of 
Romance Languages, ibid., since 1956. 

Clarence H. Patrick, B.D., Ph.D. 

Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1931; B.D., Andover Newton Theological School, 1934; 
Ph.D., Duke University, 1943; Professor of Sociology, Meredith College, 1944-47; 
Visiting Professor of Sociology, Wake Forest College, 1946-47; Professor of Soci- 
ology, ibid., since 1947. 



• Absent on leave, 1960-61. 

28 



Faculty 



Percival Perry, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of History and Dean of Summer Session 
(See Administration.) 

*Elizabeth Phillips, M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, 1939; M.A., State 
University of Iowa, 1945; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1957; Member of 
Staff, News Bureau, Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, 1940- 
43; Acting Head of English Department, Lees-McRae Junior College, 1945-46; 
Acting Instructor in English, Butler University, 1946-48; Instructor in English, 
Milwaukee-Downer College, 1949-52; Assistant Professor of English, ibid., 1952- 
54; Assistant Co-ordinator, Special Program in American Civilization, Graduate 
School, University of Pennsylvania, 1956; Assistant Professor of English, Wake 
Forest College, since 1957. 

Lewis D. Prather, B.A. 

Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army; Assistant Professor of Military 

Science and Tactics 

B.A., Presbyterian College, 1959 ;. Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
Wake Forest College, since 1959 

Herman J. Preseren, M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., State Teachers College, California, Pennsylvania, 1939; M.A., Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University, 1946; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1955; 
Professor of Social Sciences, Presbyterian Junior College, 1946-51; Instructor in 
Education, Wake Forest College, 1953-55; Assistant Professor of Education, ibid., 
1955-60; Associate Professor of Education, ibid., since 1960. 

Harold D. Propst, M.A. 

Instructor in Education 
B.A., Wake Forest College, 1956; M.A., George Peabody College, 1959: Graduate 
Student, ibid., Summer Session I960; Instructor in Education, Wake Forest Col- 
lege, 1960-61. 

Earl V. Quesinberry 

Sergeant First Class, U. S. Army; Assistant in Military Science 
and Tactics 
Assistant in Military Science and Tactics, Wake Forest College, 1957-59; 1960-61. 

Charles M. Ramsey, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Economics, School of Business Administration 

A.B., Duke University, 1920; M.A., Cornell University, 1925; M.A., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1928; Ph.D., ibid., 1953; Instructor in Economics, University of Buffalo, 
1926-1927; Instructor in Economics, Boston University, 1928-1930; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Economics, ibid., 1930-1935; Associate Professor of Economics, ibid., 
1935-1942; Associate Professor of Economics, College of Charleston, 1952-1953; 
Associate Professor of Economics, School of Business Administration, Wake 
Forest College, 1953-57; Professor of Economics, ibid., since 1957. 

Kenneth Tyson Raynor, M.A. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1914; M.A., Duke University, 1929; Graduate Student, 
University of North Carolina, 1917, 1923; Graduate Student, Duke University, 
1925-26, 1928, 1929, 1930; Teaching Fellow in Mathematics, ibid., 1925-26; Instructor 
in Mathematics, Wake Forest College, 1926-29; Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 
ibid., 1929-1952; Associate Professor of Mathematics, ibid., since 1952. 



* Absent on leave, 1960-61. 

29 



Faculty 

Mrs. Beulah Lassiter Raynor, M.A. 

Instructor in English 

B.A., East Carolina Teachers College, 1931; M.A., Wake Forest College, 1947; Teach- 
ing Fellow in English, ibid., 1945-46; Instructor in English, ibid., since 1946. 

John F. Reed, M.A. 

Colonel, Infantry, U. S. Army; Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics 

A.B., Pennsylvania State University, 1929; M.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 
1937; Graduate Student, New York University, 1931-32; University of Pittsburgh, 
Spring 1938. Professor of Military Science and Tactics, Wake Forest College, 
since 1959. 

Albert C. Reid, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1917; M.A., ibid., 1918; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1923; 
Instructor in French, Wake Forest College, 1917-18; Professor of Philosophy and 
Education, Anderson College, 1918-20; Associate Professor of Philosophy, Wake 
Forest College, 1920-23; Professor of Philosophy and Psychology, ibid., 1923-58; 
Professor of Philosophy, ibid., since 1958. 

Claud Henry Richards, Jr., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Political Science 

B.A., Texas Christian University, 1938; M.A., Duke University, 1940; Ph.D., ibid., 
1945; Graduate Assistant in Political Science, ibid., 1938-1939, 1942-1943; General 
Education Board Fellow in Political Science, 1942-1943; Part-time Instructor in 
Political Science, ibid., 1943-1944; Instructor in Government and Economics, 
Texas Christian University, 1940-1942; Assistant Professor in Government, ibid., 
1944-1946; Assistant Professor in Political Science, Duke University, 1946-1952; 
Associate Professor of Social Sciences, Wake Forest College, 1952-57; Professor of 
Political Science, ibid., Bince 1957. 

Mrs. Mary Frances McFeeters Robinson, M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., Wilson College, 1940; M.A., Syracuse University, 1947; Ph.D., ibid., 1954; 
Graduate Assistant in French, Syracuse University, 1945-46; Instructor in French, 
ibid., 1946-50; French Government Scholar with Fulbright Grant, Paris, 1950-51; 
Fellow in French, Syracuse University, 1951-52; Instructor in Romance Languages, 
Wake Forest College, 1952-54; Assistant Professor, ibid., since 1954. 

Paul S. Robinson, Mus.B., M.Sac. Mus., D.Sac. Mus. 

Associate Professor of Music 

B.A., Westminster College, 1929; Mus.B., Curtis Institute of Music, 1933; M.Sac. 
Mus., School of Sacred Music, Union Theological Seminary, 1938; D.Sac. Mus., 
ibid., 1951; Instructor in Music, University of Texas, 1951-52; Acting Director of 
Music, Wake Forest College, 1952-53; Assistant Professor of Music, ibid., 1953-57 
Associate Professor of Music, ibid., since 1957. 

*Claude V. Roebuck, Th.M. 

Instructor in Philosophy 

B.A, Wake Forest College, 1940; Th.M., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 
1944; Graduate Student, Columbia University and Union Theological Seminary. 
1946-50, 1953-54; Research Scholar, Yale University, Summer 1953; Tutor As- 
sistant in Philosophy of Religion, Union Theological Seminary, 1949-50; Instruc- 
tor in Religion and Assistant Chaplain, Williams College, 1950-51 ; Acting Chaplain 
and Instructor in Religion, ibid., 1951-52; Lecturer in Religion, ibid., 1952-53; 
Assistant to the Dean and Tutor Assistant in Theology, Union Theological Semi- 
nary, 1953-55; Instructor in Philosophy and Psychology, Wake Forest College, 
1955-58; Instructor in Philosophy, ibid., since 1958. 



* Died, February 11, 1961, 

30 



Faculty 

Gaines M. Rogers, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Finance and Dean of the School of Business Ad' 
minstration 
(See Administration.) 

Mrs. Mary Kirven Sanders, M.A. 

Instructor in English 

B.A., Coker College, 1936; M.A., University of South Carolina, 1937; Instructor in 
English, Wake Forest College, 1960-61. 

John W. Sawyer, M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., Wake Forest College, 1938; M.A., ibid., 1943; M.A., University of Missouri, 
1948; Ph.D., ibid., 1951; Instructor in Mathematics, University of Missouri, 1946- 
50; Assistant Professor of Mathematics, University of Georgia (Atlanta Division), 
1950-52; Associate Professor of Mathematics, ibid., 1952-53; Associate Professor of 
Mathematics, University of Richmond, 1953-56; Associate Professor of Mathe- 
matics, Wake Forest College, since 1956. 

*John Donald Scarlett, B.A., LL.B. 

Associate Professor of Law 

B.A., Catawba College, 1948; LL.B., Harvard University, 1951; General Practice, 
1951-52; Assistant Director, Institute of Government of North Carolina, 1952-54; 
Assistant Professor of Law, Ohio Northern University, 1954-55; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Law, Wake Forest College, 1955-57; Associate Professor of Law, ibid., 
since 1957. 

Karl Myron Scott, M.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Management, School of Business Adminstration 

B.A., University of Arkansas, 1925; M.S., Iowa State College, 1926; Ph.D., Uni 
versity of Illinois, 1930; Associate Professor of Economics and Management' 
University of North Dakota, 1930-33; Visiting Professor of Economics and Man- 
agement, Duke University, 1933-34; Professor and Head of Department of Eco- 
nomics and Business Administration, Arkansas State College, 1934-36; Dean, 
College of Business Administration, University of Arkansas, 1941-43; Professor 
and Head of Department of Economics and Business Administration, Marietta 
College, 1945-51; Chairman, Division of Economics and Business Administration, 
Arkansas Polytechnic College, 1953-55; Associate Professor of Management. 
School of Business Administration, Wake Forest College, 1955-60; Professor of 
Management, ibid., since 1960. 

Warren A. Seavey, A.B., LL.B., LL.D. 

Visiting Professor of Law 

A.B., 1902, LL.B., 1904, Harvard University. LL.D., 1928, University of Nebraska, 
1947, St. John's University, 1956, Tulane University. General practice, Boston, 
Massachusetts, 1904-06. Reporter, with others, for Restatements of Agency, 
Restitution, Torts and Judgments. Head of Law School, Pei Yang University, 
China, 1906-11. Lecturer on Pleading, Harvard Law School, 1911-12. Professor of 
Law, University of Oklahoma, 1912-14; Tulane University, 1914-16; Indiana Uni- 
versity, 1916-20. Director, College of Law, A.E.F. University, 1919. Dean and Pro- 
fessor of Law, University of Nebraska, 1920-26. Professor of Law, University of 
Pennsylvania, 1926-27; Harvard University, 1927-55. Bussey Professor of Law 
Emeritus, Harvard University, since 1955. Visiting Professor of Law at Washing- 
ton University, 1956; New York University, 1956, 1958; Boston College, 1957-58, 
1959 ; University of Texas, 1959 ; Vanderbilt University, 1960 Spring term. President 
of Association of American Law Schools, 1947, General Editor, American Case- 
book Series. Visiting Professor of Law, Wake Forest College, 1960-61. 



'Absent on leave, 1960-61. 

31 



Faculty 



Ben M. Seelbinder, M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Mississippi Delta State College, 1945: M.A., University of North Carolina, 
1950; Ph.D., ibid. , 1954; Instructor in Mathematics, Mississippi Delta State Col- 
lege, 1946-48; Part-time Instructor in Mathematics, University of North Carolina, 
1949-53; Assistant Professor of Mathematics, University of Alabama, 1953-57; 
Associate Professor of Mathematics, ibid., 1957-59; Associate Professor of Mathe- 
matics, Wake Forest College, since 1959. 

Lambert Armour Shears, Ph.D. 

Visiting Professor of German 

A.B., Columbia University, 1912; A.M., ibid., 1914; Ph.D., ibid., 1922; Instructor in 
German, Wesleyan University, 1921-22; Instructor in German, Ohio State Uni- 
versity, 1923-25 ; Instructor in German, University of Michigan, 1926-27 ; Instructor 
in German, Duke University, 1927-45; Assistant Professor of German, ibid., 1945- 
49; Associate Professor of German, ibid., 1949-54; Professor of German, ibid., 
1954-59; Visiting Professor of German, Wake Forest College, 1960-61. 

Howard William Shields, M.S., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of North Carolina, 1952; M.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1953; 
Ph.D., Duke University, 1956; Research Associate, ibid., 1956-58; Lecturer in Phys- 
ics, Wake Forest College, 1958; Assistant Professor of Physics, ibid., since 1958. 

Franklin R. Shirley, M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Speech 

B.A., Georgetown College, 1938; M.A., Columbia University, 1948; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Florida, 1959; Graduate Student, University of Cincinnati, 1940-41 
Instructor in English and Speech, Baylor School for Boys, 1943-46; Associate 
Professor of Speech, Carson-Newman College, 1946-48; Visiting Professor of 
Speech, University of Southern California, Summer 1960; Instructor in Speech, 
Wake Forest College, 1948-56; Assistant Professor of Speech, ibid., 1956-60; As- 
sociate Professor of Speech, ibid., since 1960. 

Richard Lee Shoemaker, M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., Colgate University, 1938; M.A., Syracuse University, 1940; Ph.D., University 
of Virginia, 1946; Student, University of Paris, Summer 1952; Graduate Assistant 
in French, Syracuse University, 1938-40; Professor of French, Spanish and Latin, 
The Cook Academy, Montour Falls, New York, 1940-41; Graduate Assistant in 
French and Spanish, University of Virginia, 1941-45; Instructor, ibid., 1945-47; 
Instructor in French, U. S. Army School of Military Government, ibid., 1943-44; 
Instructor and Tutor in Romance Languages and Literature, Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1947-50; Assistant Professor of Romance Languages, Wake Forest College, 
1950-54; Associate Professor of Romance Languages, ibid., since 1954. 

James E. Sizemore, B.S., LL.B. 

Professor of Law 

B.S., East Tennessee State College, 1951; LL.B., Wake Forest College, 1952; General 
Practice of Law, 1952-53; Assistant Professor of Law, Wake, Forest College, 1953-55; 
Associate Professor of Law, ibid., 1955-60; Professor of Law, ibid., since 1960. 

David L. Smiley, M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Baylor University, 1947; M.A., ibid., 1948; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 
1953; Instructor, Baylor University, 1947-48; Graduate Assistant in History, 
University of Wisconsin, 1949-50; Instructor in Social Sciences, Wake Forest Col- 
lege, 1950-54; Assistant Professor of Social Sciences, ibid., 1954-57; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of History, ibid., 1957-59; Associate Professor of History, ibid., since 1959. 

32 



Faculty 



Henry Lawrence Snuggs, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of English 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1926; M.A., Duke University, 1928; Ph.D., ibid., 1934; 
University Fellow in English, ibid., 1927-28, 1930-31 ; Graduate Assistant in English, 
ibid., 1929-30; Associate Professor of English, Elon College, 1931-34; Professor of 
English, ibid., 1934-36; Professor of English, Oklahoma Baptist University, 1936- 
45; Assistant Professor of English, Wake Forest College, 1945-47; Associate Pro- 
fessor of English, ibid., 1947-53; Professor of English, ibid., since 1953. 

Ann B. Snyder, B.A. 

Instructor in German 

B.A., Whitman College, 1952; Student, University of Tubingen, 1953-54; Graduate 
Student, Radcliffe College, 1955-59; Teaching Fellow in German, Harvard-Rad- 
cliffe, 1955-58; Instructor in German, Wake Forest College, since 1959. 

Sharon Read Spade, A.B. 

Instructor in Spanish 

A.B., Middlebury College, 1959; Middlebury College Graduate Program, University 
of Madrid, 1959-60; Instructor in Spanish, Wake Forest College, 1960-61. 

Richard Lee Staley, M.A. 

Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.A., Guilford College, 1953; M.A., Duke University, 1958; Fulbright Scholar, 
University de Montpellier, France, 1953-55; Diplome pour l'enseignement du 
francais a 1 Stranger, Universite de Montpellier, 1955; Instructor in French, Duke 
University, 1957-59; Instructor in Romance Languages, Wake Forest College, 
1960-61. 

Jack T. Stallings, M.Ed. 

Instructor in Physical Education; Baseball Coach 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1955; M.Ed., University of North Carolina, 1956; Base- 
ball Coach, Wake Forest College, 1959-60; Instructor in Physical Education, ibid., 
since 1958. 

William J. Stanley 

Sergeant First Class, U. S. Army; Assistant in Instruction in 

Military Science and Tactics 

Assistant in Instruction in Military Science and Tactics, Wake Forest College, 
since 1958. 

Henry Smith Stroupe, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of History and Director of the Division of Graduate Studies 

(See Administration.) 

Lyell Jerome Thomas, M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Economics, School of Business Administration 

A.B., Berea College, 1947; M.A., University of Virginia, 1949; Ph.D., ibid., 1958* 
Graduate Assistant, ibid., 1950-53; Instructor in Economics, Juniata College, 
1948-50; Instructor in Economics, University of Virginia, Summer, 1952; Acting 
Assistant Professor of Economics, School of Business Administration, Wake 
Forest College, 1953-59; Associate Professor of Economics, ibid., since 1959. 

Mrs. Anne S. Tillett, M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Modern Languages 

B.A., Carson-Newman College, 1935; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 1936; Ph.D., 
NorthwesternUniversity, 1943 ; Visiting Assistant Professor of Modern Languages, 
Wake Forest College, 1956-59; Assistant Professor of Modern Languages, ibid., 
1960-61. 

33 



Faculty 

Lowell R. Tillett, M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Carson-Newman College, 1947; M.A., Columbia University, 1949; Student, 
University of Oxford, Summer, 1950; Waddell Fellow in History, University of 
North Carolina, 1952-53; Ph.D., ibid., 1955; Instructor in History, Carson- 
Newman College, 1947-48; Assistant Professor of History, ibid., 1949-51; Associate 
Professor of History, ibid., 1953-56; Assistant Professor of Social Sciences, Wake 
Forest College, 1956-57; Assistant Professor of History, ibid., since 1957. 

Thomas J. Turner, M.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of North Carolina, 1947; M.S., Clemson College, 1949; Ph.D. 
University of Virginia, 1951; Instructor in Physics, Clemson College, 1947-49; 
Teaching Fellow, University of Virginia, 1950; U. S. Rubber Company Fellow, 
ibid., 1951; Assistant Professor of Physics, University of New Hampshire, 1952; 
Assistant Professor of Physics, Wake Forest College, 1952-54; Associate Professor 
of Physics, ibid., 1954-56; Professor of Physics, ibid., since 1956. 

Dan Otto Via, Jr., B.D., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.S., Davidson College, 1949; B.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1952; 
Ph.D., Duke University, 1956; Summer Session, University of Virginia, 1947, 1948; 
Duke University Graduate Scholar, 1952-1953; Gurney Harriss Kearns Fellow 
in Religion, 1953-1955; Instructor in Religion, Duke University, 1955-1956; As- 
sistant Professor of Religion, Wake Forest College, since 1956. 

James H. Walton, M.A. 

Instructor in Speech 

B.S., University of Nebraska, 1954; M.A., ibid., 1956; Director-Manager of Hayloft 
Summer Theatre, Lincoln, Neb., 1955, 1956; Graduate Student, Michigan State 
University, Summer 1957 ; Instructor in Speech, Wake Forest College, since 1956. 

Robert H. Wheeler, M.A. 

Instructor in English 

B.A., Cornell University, 1951; M.A., Boston University, 1956 ;Instructor in English, 
University of West Virginia, 1956-58; Graduate Student and Part-time Instructor, 
University of Rochester, 1958-60; Instructor in English, Wake Forest College, 
1960-61. 

Carroll W. Weathers, B.A., LL.B. 

Professor of Law and Dean of the School of Law 

(See Administration.) 

James A. Webster, Jr., B.S., LL.B. 

Professor of Law 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1949; LL.B., ibid., 1951 ; Assistant Professor of Law, Wake 
Forest College, 1951-52; General Practice, 1962-54; Assistant Professor of Law, 
Wake Forest College, 1954-55; Associate Professor of Law, ibid., 1955-60; Professor 
of Law, ibid., since 1960. 

Norman A. Wiggins, B.A., LL.M. 

Associate Professor of Law 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1950; LL.B., ibid., 1952; LL.M., Columbia University, 
1956; Assistant Trust Officer, The Planters National Bank and Trust Company 
of Rocky Mount, N. C, 1952-53; Associate Trust Officer, ibid., 1954-55; Assistant 
Professor of Law, Wake Forest College, 1956-57; Associate Professor of Law, 
ibid., since 1957. 



34 



Faculty 



George P. Williams, Jr., M.S., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Richmond, 1947; M.S., University of North Carolina, 1950; 
Ph.D., ibid., 1958; Instructor in Physics, University of Richmond, 1947-48; Gradu- 
ate Assistant, University of North Carolina, 1948-50; Associate Professor of 
Physics, Carson- Newman College, 1950-51; Instructor in Physics, University of 
Richmond and Medical College of Virginia, 1951-55; Southern Fellowship Fellow, 
University of North Carolina, 1955-58; Assistant Professor of Physics, Wake 
Forest College, since 1958. 

John Edwin Williams, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Psychology and Director of the Center for Psychological 

Services 

B.A., University of Richmond, 1951; M.A., University of Iowa, 1953; Ph.D., ibid., 
1954; Instructor in Psychology, Yale University, 1954-55; Assistant Professor of 
Psychology, University of Richmond, 1955-57; Associate Professor of Psychology, 
ibid., 1957-59, Director of Center for Psychological Services, ibid., 1955-59; Pro- 
fessor of Psychology and Director of Center for Psychological Services, Wake 
Forest College, since 1959. 

Edwin Graves Wilson, A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of English and Dean of the College 
(See Administration.) 

Eugene W. Womble, M.A. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S., Wofford College, 1952; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1959; Graduate 
Student and Teaching Assistant, Tulane University, 1952-53; Instructor in Mathe- 
matics, Wake Forest College, since 1959. 



Raymond L. Wyatt, M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1946; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1954; Ph.D., 
ibid., 1956; Instructor in Biology, Mars Hill College, 1948-1952; Instructor in 
Botany, University of North Carolina, 1955-56; Assistant Professor of Biology, 
Wake Forest College, since 1956. 



Wilfred Buck Yearns, Jr., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Duke University, 1939; M.A., University of Georgia, 1940; Graduate Student, 
University of North Carolina, 1942, 1943, 1944-45; Instructor, Georgia Military 
College, 1942-43; N. C. State College, 1943-44; University of North Carolina, 
Summers 1944, 1945; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1949; Instructor in 
Social Sciences, Wake Forest College, 1945-49; Assistant Professor of Social 
Sciences, ibid., 1949-56; Associate Professor of Social Sciences, ibid., 1956-57; Asso- 
ciate Professor of History, ibid., since 1957' 



35 



PART TIME STAFF MEMBERS 



Clifford Bair, B.Mus., D.Mus. 

Visiting Teacher of Singing 

B.Mus., Chicago Musical College, 1928; Doctor of Music, ibid., 1948; Acting Director, 
Department of Music, Battle Creek College, 1928; Student, Breslauer Stadt 
Theater School, 1929-31; Voice Faculty, Columbia School of Music, Chicago, 
1931-34; Opera-dramatic scholarship, Mozarteum, Salzburg, 1932; Head of Voice, 
Opera-dramatics Department of Wayne, (Neb.) State Teachers College, 1934-36; 
Head of Voice, Opera-dramatics Department, Salem College School of Music, 
1936-45; Acting Dean, Salem College School of Music, 1937-38; Visiting Teacher 
of Voice and Opera Workshop, Wake Forest College, 1949-60; Visiting Teacher of 
Singing, ibid., since 1960. 

James Decker, B.M., B.M.E., M.A. 

Visiting Teacher of Clarinet, Flute, and Saxophone 

B.M., DePaul University, 1953; B.M.E., ibid., 1953; M.A., Northwestern University, 
1955; Clarinetist, Chicago Civic Symphony, 1951-52; Woodwind Instructor, City 
Schools, Raleigh, N. C, 1955-58; Woodwind Instructor, City Schools, Greensboro, 
N. C, since 1958; First Clarinetist, Winston-Salem Symphony, since 1958; Visiting 
Teacher, Wake Forest College, since 1960. 

Thomas Deiner, B.M.E. 

Visiting Teacher of Oboe and Bassoon 

B.M.E., Murray State College, 1957; Director of Instrumental Music, Mineral 
Springs High School, since 1957; First Bassoonist, Winston-Salem Symphony, 
since 1957; Visiting Teacher, Wake Forest College, since 1960. 

Ray Dempsey, M.A. 

Instructor in English 

B.A., Vanderbilt University, 1941; M.A., University of Georgia, 1947; Instructor in 
English, University of Tennessee (Nashville Branch), 1956-59; Part-time Instruc- 
tor in English, Wake Forest College, 1960-61. 

Mrs. Doris C. Goble, B.A. 

Visiting Teacher of Piano 
B.A., Wake Forest College, 1959; Visiting Teacher in Piano, ibid., 1960-61. 

Mrs. Lucille S. Harris, B.A., B.M. 

Visiting Teacher of Piano 

B.A., Meredith College, 1946; B.M., ibid., 1947; Graduate Study, University of 
North Carolina, Summers, 1948, 1949; Instructor in Piano and Organ, Mars Hill 
College, 1947-50; Instructor in Piano and Organ, North Carolina School for the 
Blind, 1950-55 .Instructor in Piano, Wisconsin State College, 1956; Visiting Teacher 
of Piano, Wake Forest College, since 1957. 

George H. Hobart, M.A., Ph.D. 

Visiting Professor of Economics 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1908; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1941; 
Ph.D., ibid., 1948; Graduate Student, University of Michigan, 1939; Western Re- 
serve University, 1940; New York University, 1943; Assistant Professor of Econom- 
ics, Alfred University, 1942-45; Professor of Business Administration and Head 
of the Department of Business Administration, High Point College, 1945-57; 
Visiting Professor of Economics, Wake Forest College, since 1957. 

36 



Part Time Staff Members 



Eugene Jacobowsky, M.A. 

Visiting Teacher of Violin 

B.S., Juilliard School of Music, 1948; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1949; Instructor in Violin, Elon College, 1949-51; Instructor in Violin, Salem Col- 
lege, since 1951; Concertmaster, Winston-Salem Symphony, since 1949; Visiting 
Teacher, Wake Forest College, since 1960. 

John T. McDowell, M.S.W. 

Lecturer in Sociology 

B.A., Furman University, 1946; M.S.W., University ol North Carolina, 1954; Gradu- 
ate student, New York School of Social Work; South Carolina Department of 
Public Welfare, 1950-55; Superintendent Department of Public Welfare, Forsyth 
County, since 1955; Lecturer in Sociology, Wake Forest College, since 1958. 

Charles Medlin 

Visiting Teacher of Cello 

Certificate in Performance, Juilliard School of Music, 1946; Cellist, Indianapolis 
Symphony, 1946-53; Instructor, MacArthur Conservatory, Indianapolis, Indiana, 
1949-51; Principal Cellist, Winston-Salem Symphony, since 1953; Instructor in 
Cello, Salem College, since 1953; Visiting Teacher, Wake Forest College, since 
1960. 

Mrs. William A. Ogden 

Instructor in Physical Education 

University of Kentucky, 1947-49; Studied with Ted Shawn and Russe de Monte 
Carlo, 1949-50; Member, Louisville Civic Ballet Company, 1950-51; Director 
School of the Dance, Lexington, Ky., 1951-54; Instructor, Summit School, 
Winston-Salem, N. C, 1954-59; Instructor in Physical Education, Wake Forest 
College, since 1959. 

W. P. Sandridge, B.S., LL.B. 

Lecturer in Law 

B.S., University of Virginia, 1925; LL.B., ibid., 1928. General civil practice of law, 
since 1928. Member firm, Womble, Carlyle, Sandridge and Rice, since 1937. Lec- 
turer in Law, Wake Forest College, 1961 Spring term. 

Mrs. Margaret B. Seeleinder, M.A. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

B.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1946; M.A., University of North Caro- 
lina, 1950; Assistant in Chemistry and Mathematics, Randolph-Macon Woman's 
College, 1946-48; Part-time Instructor in Mathematics, University of North Caro- 
lina, 1948-53; Instructor in Mathematics, Wake Forest College, 1960-61. 

Mrs. Anne Talbot Shorter, M.A. 

Instructor in English 

B. A. .Woman's College, University of North Carolina, 1955; M. A., Duke University 
1957; Instructor in English, Louisburg College, 1956-57; Graduate Student, Duke 
University, 1957-58; Part-time Instructor in English, Wake Forest College, 1960-61. 

Miss Ruby Woolf, B.M., M.A. 

Visiting Teacher of Viola and Double Bass 

B.M., University of Oklahoma, 1939; M.A. in Music Education, George Peabody 
College for Teachers, 1942 ; Visiting Teacher in Viola, Wake Forest College, 1960-61 . 

37 



COACHING STAFF 



William H. Gibson, M.A. 

Director of Athletics 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1929; M.A., ibid., 1942; Coach, Apex High School, 1929-35; 
Principal, Apex High School, 1935-38; Dean of Boys, Hugh Morson High School, 
Raleigh, 1938-39; Coach, Thomasville High School, 1939-42; Agent, Federal Bureau 
of Investigation, 1942-56; Director of Athletics, Wake Forest College, since 1956. 

Jesse I. Haddock, B.S. 

Assistant Director of Athletics 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1952; Athletic Equipment Manager, ibid., 1952-53; Assist- 
ant to Director of Athletics, ibid., 1954-56; Assistant Director of Athletics, ibid., 
since 1956. 

C. William Hildebrand, B.S. 

Football Coach 

B.S., Mississippi State College, 1947; Assistant Football Coach, Mississippi State 
College, 1947-49, 1952-54; Assistant Football Coach, Purdue University, 1949-50; 
Assistant Football Coach, University of Tennessee, 1950; Head Football Coach, 
Whitworth College, 1951-52; Assistant Football Coach, University of Minnesota, 
1954-56; Assistant Football Coach, Wake Forest College, 1956-60; Football Coach, 
ibid., since January 1960. 

Horace A. McKinney 

Basketball Coach 

Assistant Basketball Coach, Wake Forest College, 1952-57; Basketball Coach 
ibid., since 1957. 

Jack T. Stallings, M.Ed. 

Baseball Coach; Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1955; M.Ed., University of North Carolina, 1956; Instruc- 
tor in Physical Education, Wake Forest College, since 1958; Baseball Coach, 
ibid., since 1959. 

Edgar W. Jordan, M.Ed. 

Track Coach; Instructor in Physical Education 

B.A., University of Richmond, 1953; M.Ed., University of North Carolina, 1954; 
Graduate Assistant in Physical Education, University of North Carolina, 1953-54; 
Instructor in Physical Education and Assistant Track Coach, North Carolina 
State College, 1954-55; Track Coach and Instructor in Physical Education, Wake 
Forest College, since 1956. 

Leo Ellison, Jr., M.S. 

Swimming Coach; Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., Northwestern State College, 1956; M.S., ibid., 1957; Graduate Assistant in 
Physical Education, ibid., 1956-57; Instructor in Physical Education and Swim- 
ming Coach, Wake Forest College, since 1957. 

* Elmer Barbour, B.S. 

Assistant Football Coach 

B.S., Wake Forest College, 1950; Assistant Football Coach, Durham High School; 
Head Coach, Paul High School, Washington, D. C.J Head Football Coach, 
Durham High School, 1950-56; Assistant Football Coach, Wake Forest College, 
since 1956. 



' Resigned, February 5, 1961 

38 



Coaching Staff 



Richard Hunter, B.S. 

Assistant Football Coach 

B.S., Miami University, 1955; Coach, Barberton, Ohio, High School, 1955-58; As- 
sistant Football Coach, Denison University, 1958-59; Assistant Football Coach, 
Wake Forest College, 1960-61. 

* Charles Robert Knox, B.S. 

Assistant Football Coach 

B.S., Juniata College, 1954; Line Coach, ibid., 1954; Assistant Football Coach, 
Tyrone, Pennsylvania, High School, 1955; Head Football Coach, Ellwood City, 
Pennsylvania, High School, 1956-58; Assistant Football Coach, Wake Forest 
College, since 1959. 

Ray Thornton, B.A. 

Assistant Football Coach 

B.A., University of Mississippi, 1953; Football Coach, Dekalb, Mississippi, High 
School, 1954; Football Coach, Itawamba, Mississippi, Junior College, 1955-59; 
Assistant Football Coach, Wake Forest College, 1960-61. 

** Cecil W. Ingram, M.A. 

Assistant Football Coarc 

B.S., University of Alabama, 1955; M.A., ibid., 1959; Football Coach, Bradenton, 
Florida, High School, 1956; Football Coach, Brookwood, Alabama, High School, 
1957; Football Coach, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, High School, 1958-59; Assistant 
Football Coach, Wake Forest College, 1960-61. 

Kenneth M. Bryant, B.A. 

Assistant Basketball Coach and Tennis Coach 

B.A., Wofford College, 1954; Football Coach, Basketball Coach, and Baseball 
Coach, U. S. Army, 1954-56; Football and Basketball Coach, Anderson, South 
Carolina, High School, 1956-57; Freshman Basketball Coach and Freshman 
Baseball Coach, Wake Forest College, 1957-60; Assistant Basketball Coach and 
Tennis Coach, ibid., since 1960. 

William Deberry Fesperman, B.A. 

Freshman Football Coach 
B. A., Duke University, 1956; Assistant Football Coach, Broughton High School, 
Raleigh, 1956-58; Assistant Football Coach, Gray High School, Winston-Salem, 
1958-59; Assistant Football Coach, Durham High School, 1959-60; Freshman 
Football Coach, Wake Forest College, 1960-61. 

Jack Murdock, B.A. 

Freshman Basketball Coach; Freshman Baseball Coach 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1958; Basketball Coach, Clinton, North Carolina, High 
School, 1959; Freshman Basketball Coach and Freshman Baseball Coach, Wake 
Forest College, 1960-61. 

Lewis Martin 

Athletic Trainer 

University of Georgia, 1951-55; Assistant Trainer, University of Georgia, 1951-55; 
Trainer, Furman University, 1955-58; Trainer, Wake Forest College, since 1958. 



• Resigned January 21, 1961. 
** Resigned January 28, 1961. 



39 



STAFFS OF THE LIBRARIES 



The Z. Smith Reynolds Library 
(General Library) 

Carlton P. West, M.A., B.S. in L.S., Librarian 

Mrs. Kent Barbee, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Circulation Librarian 

Minnie S. Kallam, A.B., B.S. in L.S., Reference Librarian 

Mrs. Ernestine P. Howe, B.S. in L.S., Catalog Librarian 

Mrs. Dorothy Rowley, A.B., B.S. in L.S., Periodicals Librarian 

James M. Nicholson, Director of the Baptist Collection 

Mrs. Carol J. Oexman, B.S., Assistant Catalog Librarian 

Mrs. Nina Y. Garvey, A.B., Assistant Catalog Librarian 

Minnie Morris Huggins, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Assistant Reference 
Librarian 

Library of the School of Law 

Mrs. Vivian L. Wilson, A.B., B.S. in L.S., Librarian 

Library of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

Nell Benton, B.A., Librarian 



40 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

1961-1962 

Effective September 1, 1961 

The terms of members, except where otherwise shown, expire 
on August 31 of the year indicated. Each committee selects its own 
chairman except where the chairman is designated. All members of 
a committee vote except as otherwise indicated. 

Absences 
Non-voting. Dean of the College, Registrar, Dean of Women. 
Voting. 1964 Wyatt; 1963 Gay; 1962 Owen. 

Admissions 

Non-Voting. Dean of the College, Registrar, Dean of Women, 
Director of Admissions. 

Voting. 1964 J. R. Johnson, Jr., G. P. Williams; 1963 G. J. Griffin, 
Heath; 1962 Isbell, Tillett. 

Advisory Council to Lower Division 

J. R. Johnson, Jr., Chairman; Angell, Aycock, Banks, Bateman, 
Blalock, Brehme, Britt, Burroughs, Chee, Cook, J. E. Davis, Dorn- 
busch, Dyer, Gregg, Gregory, Griffin, Gross, E. W. Hamrick, P. J. 
Hamrick, C. V. Harris, W. O. Harris, Hitchins, Hooks, Howren, 
Johnston, Josserand, Kenion, H. B. Miller, Mullen, Owen, Parker, 
Phillips, P. S. Robinson, Roebuck, Seelbinder, Thomas, Via, G. P. 
Williams, Wyatt. 

Athletics 

Administrative: Dean of the College, Treasurer of the College, 
Faculty Chairman Sawyer; 1964 Cook, Dodson; 1963 Patrick, 
Yearns; 1962 Stroupe, Turner. 

Buildings and Grounds 

Administrative Officials: Copeland, Moore, Patterson, Wilson; 
1966 Allen, 1965 H. B. Miller, 1964 Heath, 1963 Via, 1962 Aycock. 

Calendar 
Dean of the College, Registrar, Dean of Women. 

41 



Committees 



Curriculum 

Dean of the College, Chairman; President, Dean of the School of 
Business Administration, Registrar, and the chairman of each de- 
partment of the School of Arts and Sciences as follows: Biology, 
Chemistry, Classical Languages, Education, English, History, Mathe- 
matics, Military Science and Tactics, Modern Languages, Music, 
Philosophy, Physical Education, Physics, Political Science, Psy- 
chology, Religion, Sociology, Speech. 

Executive 

Non-voting. President, Dean of Women. 

Voting. Dean of the College, Chairman; Dean of the School of 
Business Administration, and the following faculty members 1964 
Gross, J. E. Williams; 1963 Clonts, Snuggs; 1962 Barrow, Easley. 

Library 

Librarian and the following faculty members: 1964 Brehme, Earp, 
Gregg, Hooks, Reid, Paul Robinson; 1963 Blalock, Bryan, Burroughs, 
J. E. Davis, Howren, Thomas; 1962 Banks, J. R. Johnson, Jr., Jos- 
serand, Memory, Parker. 

Nominations 
1964 Hylton, Mullen; 1963 Nowell, Via; 1962 Brown, Perry. 

Orientation 

Dean of the College, Chairman; Dean of Women, President of the 
Student Government or his designated representative. 

Publications 

Folk, Chairman; Bateman, Burroughs, Copeland, Howren, Parker, 
Shirley, Smiley, Via, Wilson. 

ROTC Board 

ROTC Co-ordinator, Professor of Military Science and Tactics, and 
the following faculty members: 1964 Black; 1963 Cook; 1962 Helm. 

Schedule 

Non-voting. Dean of the College, Registrar. 

Voting. 1966 Ramsey; 1965 J. R. Johnson, Jr.; 1964 Drake; 1963 
Bryan; 1962 H. B. Miller. 

42 



Committees 



Scholarships and Student Aid 

Dean of the College, Dean of Women, and the following faculty 
members: 1964 Gregory, Johnston; 1963 Easley, Reid; 1962 Dyer, 
Thomas. 

Student Affairs 

Non-Voting. President, Dean of the College, Dean of Women, 
Chaplain, Director of Concerts and Lectures. 

Voting. 1964 Bateman, Head, Preseren; 1963 Casey, P.J. Hamrick, 
W. O. Harris; 1962 Earp, Hooks, Jumper. 

Faculty Marshals 
1963 Banks, 1962 Broderick. 

Faculty Council 

President of the College, Chairman; Dean of the College, Dean of 
the School of Law, Dean of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine, 
Dean of the School of Business Administration, and the following, 
whose terms expire on December 31 of the year indicated: 

Representatives of the School of Arts and Sciences: 1963 E. W. Hamrick, 
Parcell; 1962 Nowell, Smiley; 1961 Perry, Richards. 

Representatives of the School of Law: 1962 Divine; 1961 Sizemore. 

Representatives of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine: 1962 C. N. Hern- 
don; 1961 Morehead. 

Representatives of the School of Business Administration: 1962 Thomas; 
1961 Scott. 



48 



THE COLLEGE AND ITS EQUIPMENT 

Historical Sketch 

Historical Background. The history of the founding 
of Wake Forest College is inseparable from the his- 
tory of the formation of the Baptist State Convention. 
One of the two main purposes which led to the organ- 
zation of the convention in 1830 was to establish an edu- 
cational institution that would give training under 
Christian influences and provide educated ministers. 

Immediately after the formation of the Baptist State 
Convention, Dr. Samuel Wait, serving as agent for the 
Convention, began an intensive four-year educational 
campaign among the Baptists of the State. Two years 
later, in 1832, the Convention purchased from Dr. 
Calvin Jones a 600-acre farm sixteen miles north of 
Raleigh, to be used as a site for the proposed school. 

Wake Forest Institute. Under the authorization of 
a charter granted by the State Legislature in December 
1833, the school was opened as Wake Forest Institute 
on February 3, 1834, with Dr. Wait as principal. Al- 
though the primary purpose was to give collegiate in- 
struction in the arts and sciences, for five years the Wake 
Forest Institute operated as a manual labor school, 
attracting liberal patronage from the large planters of 
the State, who wished their sons to receive practical 
training in agriculture, along with education in the 
liberal arts. In 1836 the enrollment had increased from 
the original 16 to 141. 

The College. The manual labor feature was aban- 
doned at the close of the year 1838, and the institution 
was rechartered, in December 1838, as Wake Forest 
College. 

With teachers who were graduates of Columbian 

44 



Historical Sketch 



College, Brown University, and Dartmouth College, 
and with a liberal arts curriculum that was standard 
for the time, Wake Forest College conferred the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts upon four young men in June 1839. 
From 1839 to 1894 the College operated exclusively 
as a college of liberal arts; the School of Law was estab- 
lished in June 1894, the School of Medicine in May 1902, 
the School of Business Administration in 1948, the 
Division of Evening Classes in 1957, and the Division 
of Graduate Studies in 1961. In 1942 the College be- 
came co-educational 

The College has given instruction to many thousands 
of students and has sent them out into varied fields of 
service. Among these have been a large number of minis- 
ters, missionaries, lawyers, physicians, educators, writers, 
scientists, businessmen, farmers, and influential leaders 
in governmental affairs. From the beginning the College 
has made marked contributions to Christianity, to cul- 
ture, and to a higher type of citizenship generally, in 
accordance with the original purpose of the founders of 
the institution. 

In 1946 the Trustees of the College and the Baptist 
State Convention accepted an offer made by the 
Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation to give the College 
$350,000 annually in perpetuity for operation of the 
school on condition that it be moved to Winston- 
Salem and that other friends of the College provide a 
campus site and buildings. This decision was made 
three years after the College had undertaken an En- 
largement Program to provide much needed buildings 
and other physical facilities on the old campus. 

Mr. Charles H. Babcock and his wife, the late Mary 
Reynolds Babcock, contributed a part of the beautiful 
Reynolda Estate for the new campus. Ground-breaking 

45 



Historical Sketch 



ceremonies were held on October 15, 1951, with the 
President of the United States delivering the principal 
address. The following spring actual construction began. 
Accompanying the construction was intensive fund- 
raising. In 1955 the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation 
increased its annual payments to the College to $500,000. 
The actual move from Wake Forest to Winston-Salem 
took place in May and June of 1956. The Bowman 
Gray School of Medicine of the College had been moved 
to Winston-Salem in 1941 when it received the resources 
of the Bowman Gray Foundation. 

Summer school opened on the new campus on June 
18, 1956, the fall term on September 11 and formal 
dedication exercises were held on October 18. The 
old campus and buildings at Wake Forest were sold 
to the Southern Baptist Convention for use of the 
Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary which now 
occupies the campus. 

Administration and Instruction. The College is governed 
by a Board of Trustees which is elected by the North 
Carolina Baptist Convention. The Board has thirty-six 
members who serve four-year terms, with nine being 
chosen each year at the annual convention. 

During its history of 127 years the College has been 
headed by a total of ten presidents, the administrations 
of four of these (Dr. Washington Manly Wingate, Dr. 
Charles E. Taylor, Dr. William Louis Poteat and Dr. 
Thurman D. Kitchin) covering a total of 88 years. The 
complete list of presidents,* with the dates of their 
administrations, follows: 

Samuel Wait, D.D 1834-45 

William Hooper, D.D., LL.D 1845-49 

• During the years 1882-84, William Bailey Royall, B.A., M.A., D.D. (Professor of 
Greek), served as chairman of the Faculty. 

46 



Historical Sketch 



John Brown White, M.A 1849-54 

Washington Manly Wingate, D.D 1854-79 

Thomas Henderson Pritchard, D.D 1879-82 

Charles Elisha Taylor, D.D., LL.D 1884-1905 

William Louis Poteat, LL.D., Litt.D 1905-27 

Francis Pendleton Gaines, Ph.D., Litt.D., 

LL.D 1927-30 

Thurman D. Kitchin, M.D., LL.D., F.A.C.P. . 1930-50 
Harold Wayland Tribble, M.A., Th.M., 

Th.D., Ph.D., D.D., LL.D 1950- 

The growth and progress of the College are due in no 
small degree to the leadership of its presidents * and to 
the faculty of instruction, many of whom have rendered 
distinguished service for thirty years or more. These 
include: Dr. William Bailey Royall, professor of Greek, 
62 years: Dr. William Louis Poteat, Biology, 55 years; 
Dr. Benjamin F. Sledd, English, 50 years; Prof. Edgar 
W. Timberlake, Law, 50 years; Dr. J. Hendren Gorrell, 
Modern Languages, 45 years; Dr. Hubert McNeill 
Poteat, Latin, 44 years; Dr. Needham Y. Gulley, Law 
44 years, and Dr. George W. Paschal, Classical Lan- 
guages, 43 years. Mr. Elliott B. Earnshaw served as 
Bursar for 45 years. Of the present faculty, seventeen 
have served more than thirty years, including the fol- 
lowing who became emeriti after serving more than 
thirty-five years: Dr. W. R. Cullom, professor emeritus 
in 1938, after completing his forty-second year, and 
Dr. D. B. Bryan who was Professor of Education for 
thirty-six years and Dean of the College for thirty- 
four years; Prof. Hubert A. Jones who taught Mathe- 
matics for fifty-one years; Dr. Henry Broadus Jones 
who taught English for thirty-five years; and Dr. 

* Those interested in more specific information are referred to the three-volume 
History of Wake Forest College by Dr. George W. Paschal. 

47 



Endowment 

William E. Speas who taught Physics for thirty-nine 
years. Mrs. Ethel Taylor Crittenden retired in 1946 
after thirty-one years as Librarian. In a word, the 
College has enlisted and retained throughout their 
teaching careers men who have devoted themselves to 
the College and to its ideals of culture and Christian 
leadership. 

Endowment 
In 1865 the endowment fund of Wake Forest Col- 
lege was $11,700, the remnant from the wreck of war. 
In 1876, through the efforts of Dr. C. E. Taylor and Mr. 
James S. Purefoy, about $20,000 was added to the 
endowment. By January 1, 1884, Dr. Taylor had in- 
creased the endowment to $100,000 and had raised 
up a generous friend of the College in Mr. Jabez A. 
Bostwick, of New York City. In 1885 Mr. Bostwick 
created the Bostwick Loan Fund by a gift of $12,000 
and in 1886 made a further gift of $50,000. In 1891 
Dr. Taylor raised, by subscription and still another 
gift of Mr. Bostwick, the sum of $40,000. Under the 
terms of the will of Mr. Bostwick, dating from February 
1, 1892, the endowment was increased, in 1923, by stock 
valued at about $1,500,000. From 1906 to 1910 Pro- 
fessor J. B. Carlyle undertook to raise $150,000. Of 
this sum $117,798.56 was realized, of which the Gen- 
eral Education Board of New York contributed a 
fourth. More than $100,000 was added by receipts 
from the Seventy-five Million Campaign and the pro 
rata contribution of the General Education Board. On 
November 20, 1925, Mr. B. N. Duke, of New York City, 
made a generous donation to the endowment of 1,000 
shares of Duke Power Company stock valued at $150,- 
000. On August 3, 1939, the resources of the Bowman 
Gray Foundation were awarded to Wake Forest Col- 

48 



Endowment 



lege, to be used exclusively by the School of Medicine. 

The Chair of the Bible, known as the Albritton Chair 
of the Bible, is provided by a gift of $25,000.00 con- 
tributed in 1919 by the children of the Reverend John 
T. Albritton and $25,000.00 by the Eastern Baptist 
Association. 

On December 21, 1946, eighteen-thirty-fifths of the 
income from the James A. Gray Trust Fund was made 
available to the School of Medicine for the general 
furtherance of teaching and research. 

The total endowment funds now controlled by the 
College amount to approximately $5,910,000 (book 
value as of June 30, 1960). 

The Trustees of The Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, 
Inc., and The Trustees of Wake Forest College entered 
into a contract on November 16, 1946, whereby the 
Foundation made available to the College income of 
the Foundation up to $350,000 per year in perpetuity, 
this sum being increased to $500,000 in 1955. The in- 
come so received was applied to the costs of construction 
on the new campus prior to the time of removal in 1956 
and thereafter to the cost of operations. 

The College holds a beneficial interest of one-fourth 
of the income of the Mary K. Fassett Trust Fund 
established by Dr. Burton W. Fassett of Durham, N. C, 
this interest to increase when the principal of the fund 
reaches a specified amount. 

The College holds a beneficial interest of 41% of the 
income of the Lucy Teague Fassett Memorial Trust 
Fund, also established by Dr. Fassett, this interest to 
increase when the principal of the fund reaches a speci- 
fied amount. 

Under the terms of the will of Colonel George Foster 

49 



Buildings 

Hankins of Lexington, North Carolina, who died in 
1954, The George Foster Hankins Foundation was 
established, to be managed and controlled by The 
Trustees of Wake Forest College. The income of the 
Foundation is to be used for scholarships and loan 
funds in aid of worthy and deserving students displaying 
promise and ability who might be denied a college 
education because of lack of means, with preference in 
the award of scholarships and loans to be given to 
applicants from Davidson County, North Carolina. The 
assets of the Foundation on June 30, 1960, at book value 
amounted to approximately $1,220,000. 

R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Professorships 

In 1958 the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company made 
a grant of $125,000 to the College for the purpose of 
establishing one or more distinguished professorships in 
chemistry. Under the provisions of this grant Dr. Paul M. 
Gross, Jr., Associate Professor of Chemistry, was ap- 
pointed as the first R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company 
Professor. 

Buildings and Grounds 

The physical equipment of the College includes about 
331 acres of land and 14 buildings. There are, in ad- 
dition, a president's home, ten faculty apartment build- 
ings housing seventy-two separate families, and two 
buildings containing fifty-six apartments for married 
students. Construction on the campus was begun in 
1952 and it was occupied for the first time beginning 
with the summer session of 1956. The buildings are of 
modified Georgian architecture, constructed of Old 
Virginia brick and trimmed in granite and limestone. 
Situated on beautifully landscaped hills, the campus is 
one of the most attractive in the South. 

50 



Buildings 

Academic Buildings 

Wait Chapel. Located at the head of the campus 
plaza is Wait Chapel, so designated in memory of the 
first President of Wake Forest College, Samuel Wait. 
Its spire towers two hundred and thirty feet into the 
air and its auditorium has a seating capacity of twenty- 
five hundred. A four-manual pipe organ and choir 
space for one hundred members are a part of the equip- 
ment. Wait Chapel faces toward the south, overlooking 
the plaza, with Reynolda Hall in the foreground and 
four large dormitories for men at right and left. 

Wingate Hall. Attached to Wait Chapel on the 
northern end is a four-story building for the Department 
of Religion and for educational purposes of a campus 
church. This part of the building has been named in 
honor of Washington Manly Wingate, President of 
Wake Forest College, 1854-1879. In addition to class- 
rooms and offices for professors, there is the Paul Price 
Davis Meditation Chapel, equipped with pews and 
other facilities, for the use of small groups. There is also 
in the basement an assembly room accommodating 
about three hundred people and equipped with stage 
and dressing rooms. 

Reynolda Hall. Located at the southern end of the 
plaza area and facing Wait Chapel is Reynolda Hall, 
administration and student center. A wing on the 
west end accommodates administrative offices of the 
College; a wing of similar size on the east end fur- 
nishes facilities for student organizations and activities. 
On the ground floor, facing south, is the cafeteria, 
equipped for seating at one time one thousand people 
and for serving four lines. Back of the cafeteria are 
kitchens, refrigeration units, and storage rooms. On the 

51 



Buildings 

floor above are lounges and conference rooms. On the 
third floor are a large banquet room and space which 
will be used temporarily for classrooms and offices for 
professors. A fourth floor contains a number of class- 
rooms. 

The £. Smith Reynolds Library. Situated at the center 
of the academic campus, this building contains space 
for eight tiers of book stacks, with a capacity for about 
one million volumes. Surrounding the book stacks are 
four floors of rooms for reading, reference, and various 
other uses of a modern library. Some of the space in 
this building is to be used for a few years for classrooms 
and offices. 

Science and Research. A three-story building located 
directly west of the Library housed the three basic 
sciences of biology, chemistry, and physics for the first 
five years on the new campus. This building contains 
many laboratories, classrooms and offices, as well as a 
large lecture room and ample storage space. 

A building to house the Departments of Biology and 
Psychology is under construction just west of the present 
Science Building. It will provide classrooms, labora- 
tories, faculty offices, seminar rooms and a small audi- 
torium, and should be ready for use by September, 1961. 

The W. N. Reynolds Gymnasium. Located just east of 
Reynolda Hall, this building is equipped with classrooms 
for instruction in physical education, courts for basketball 
and other indoor sports, a swimming pool, offices for 
members of the faculty of the Department of Physical 
Education and of the Department of Athletics. Here, 
also, is housed the Department of Military Science 
and Tactics. No provision is made in this building for 
large spectator facilities, since the near-by Memorial 

52 



Buildings 

Coliseum will be used for intercollegiate basketball 
games and other indoor sports. On either side of the 
Gymnasium are sports fields and courts for tennis, 
handball, and volleyball. 

Law Building. At the opposite end of the academic 
campus from the Science Building is located the building 
for the School of Law. It is a four-story structure, con- 
taining classrooms, offices, a moot court, an assembly 
room, a library, a seminar room, a law review room, and 
a student lounge. 

Residence Buildings 

Dormitories for Men. Bordering the plaza area on the 
east and the west are four quadrangles of dormitories for 
men, with accommodations for fifteen hundred students. 
The dormitories are named in honor of Charles Elisha 
Taylor, William Louis Poteat, and Thurman Delna 
Kitchin, former Presidents of Wake Forest College, and 
Egbert Lawrence Davis, a benefactor of the College. 
Each quadrangle contains three main floors with open 
galleries overlooking the quadrangles. From these gal- 
leries are entrances to the suites of rooms each of which 
is occupied by a small group of students. Connecting 
the Poteat and Taylor Dormitories with the Chapel 
entrance are two wings, equipped to accommodate 
about one hundred students each. One of these wings is 
Efird Hall, in honor of Mr. J. B. Efird of Charlotte, and 
another, Huffman Hall, in honor of Mr. Frank Huffman 
of Morgan ton. Facing the plaza are a post office, a 
bank, a drug store, a book store, and a number of shops, 
all housed in these dormitories. 

Dormitories for Women. At the southern end of the 
academic campus, facing Reynolda Hall, are two 

53 



Libraries 

dormitories for women, accommodating four hundred 
students, that on the east being named Bostwick Dormi- 
tory in honor of Mr. Jabez A. Bostwick, one of the chief 
benefactors of the College, and that on the west being 
named Lois Johnson Dormitory, in honor of Miss Lois 
Johnson, first Dean of Women of Wake Forest College. 
Both double and single rooms are available for students 
and each floor of the buildings is equipped with a 
kitchenette and a launderette. A large lounge is located 
on the first floor of each building. 

A dormitory for women to accommodate 126 students 
is under construction just west of Johnson Dormitory. 
In design it is similar to Bostwick and Johnson Dormi- 
tories, with some new features. It should be ready for 
use by September, 1961. 

The Power Plant, connected by tunnels with all 
buildings on the campus, is located on a lower level 
northwest of the athletic fields. Attractive and modern 
in design, it is equipped with two massive boilers that 
furnish heat and hot water for all buildings, including 
the faculty apartments, and is the basis of the air-con- 
ditioning system installed in Wait Chapel, Reynolda 
Hall, the Z. Smith Reynolds Library, the Science 
Building, the Law Building, and the Gymnasium. 

The Maintenance Building. Located in close proximity 
to the heating plant to the south is the maintenance 
building for the purpose of making repairs and con- 
structing many things essential to the operation of the 
various departments of the College. 

Libraries 
In its several libraries the College possesses a total of 
182,952 volumes, not including several thousand United 

54 



Libraries 

States Government publications. These volumes are dis- 
tributed as follows: the Z. Smith Reynolds Library 
(general), 133,332; the Library of the School of Law, 
28,222; and the Library of the Bowman Gray School 
of Medicine, 21,398. 

The books which constitute the Z. Smith Reynolds 
Library have been chosen principally to serve three 
basic purposes. It is considered essential, in the first 
place, to develop and service a library which will be 
adequate to the instructional program of a liberal arts 
college and which will provide fundamental reference 
works. Futhermore, in keeping with the position of the 
College as an integral part of the North Carolina 
Baptist organization, a Baptist Collection, now including 
more than 5,000 items, is maintained. Substantial files 
of Baptist newspapers and periodicals, and manuscript 
records of many individual churches are included. Fi- 
nally, to provide material for the study of North Carolina 
and the Southeastern region, a workable collection of 
North Caroliniana and materials concerning neighbor- 
ing states has been promoted. The generosity of certain 
individuals has made possible the special collections 
mentioned below. 

The late Dr. Charles Lee Smith of Raleigh, an 
alumnus and life-long bibliophile, bequeathed his per- 
sonal library to the College. It is a collection of more 
than 7,000 volumes rich in first editions and important 
association items. Funds from a bequest of his brother, 
the late Oscar T. Smith of Baltimore, are used for the 
purchase of similar materials, although such acquisitions 
are shelved apart from the Charles Lee Smith library 
itself. 

The Paschal Collection was established Christmas 
1950 by George W. Paschal, Jr., 1927, Raleigh surgeon, 

55 



Libraries 

in recognition of the interest in the Library manifested 
by his father, George Washington Paschal, and also in 
memory of his father's twin brother, Robert Lee Paschal. 
The Collection is regularly enlarged and, although 
heterogeneous in nature, primarily contains material 
relating to the Humanities. The aim of the founder of the 
Collection is to add to the working efficiency of the 
Library. While this collection is principally supported 
by the donor, it has also received and welcomes contri- 
butions from interested friends. A special bookplate is 
used for items acquired for the Collection. 

To acquire the more important editions of the works 
of Edmund Spenser, together with significant back- 
ground titles, a sum of money has been contributed 
by Dr. Charles G. Smith of Baylor University in honor 
of his wife, Cornelia Marschall Smith. A fund established 
by the late Dr. Herman Harrell Home of New York 
University is applied to the purchase of general titles 
of particular value to undergraduate instruction. 

Other groups of books, smaller but no less significant 
than those mentioned above, may be found in the 
Library. The late Dr. B. W. Spilman both financed 
and otherwise encouraged the collection of books 
whose authors are alumni of the College. Through 
participation in the McGregor Plan, an arrange- 
ment whereby funds provided by the late Mr. Tracy 
McGregor were made available to a selected group 
of colleges and universities for the purchase of rare 
Americana, the Library has acquired a valuable col- 
lection of works belonging to the colonial and early 
national periods of American history. As a United 
States Government depository the Library has avail- 
able the more important documents issued by the 
various governmental agencies. As the result of a gift 

56 



Art Museum 



from the Carnegie Corporation the Library contains 
about 2,500 excellent photographs and many books 
pertaining to the history of painting, sculpture, and 
architecture. A group of more than a thousand book- 
plates was contributed by Mrs. Clara T. Evans of New 
York City. 

The Library of the School of Law contains 28,222 
volumes, including not only the reports, statutes, and 
digests required by the American Association of Law 
Schools but also the leading textbooks, encyclopedias, 
and periodicals. 

The Library of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine 
is a collection of 21,398 volumes which provides the 
books, periodicals, and monographs necessary to in- 
struction and research in medical theory and practice. 
More than 500 current periodicals, both domestic and 
foreign, are received. 

The Spilman Philosophy Seminar contains a carefully 
selected group of books for the use of advanced students 
in philosophy. Although not supported by Library funds 
but based upon an endowment given by the late Dr. 
B. W. Spilman and upon the newly established A. C. 
Reid Philosophy Fund, it forms a valuable part of the 
book resources of the College. 

Art Museum 
The Museum of Art is made up mainly of the T. J. 
Simmons Collection, presented to the College by the 
late Dr. Thomas Jackson Simmons of Gainesville, Ga., 
and formally opened to the public on June 2, 1941. 
Exhibited temporarily in the former library room of the 
William Amos Johnson Building, it has been stored 
since the summer of 1952 for lack of gallery space. 
Including some additions, there are about sixty paint- 

57 



Art Museum 



ings, thirty-five etchings and lithographs, five pieces of 
sculpture, and several other art objects in the collection. 

The Museum was enriched in 1957 by three paint- 
ings from the Hammer Galleries given by Mr. Arnold 
Kirkeby, and in 1960 by two paintings given by Mr. 
Clark Hartwell and three by Mrs. April Ruth Akston. 

Many of the paintings are hung in public areas of 
various buildings on the campus. 



58 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Admission to the College 

A candidate for admission to Wake Forest College 
must furnish testimonials of good moral character, 
must present evidences of educational achievement 
represented by graduation from an accredited public 
high school or an accredited private secondary school, 
and must present satisfactory scores on the Scholastic 
Aptitude (Morning) Test of the College Entrance Ex- 
amination Board. The record of the work done by the 
applicant in high school or in a private secondary school 
and the recommendations of the school official must be 
sent direct to the Director of Admissions of Wake 
Forest College by an official of the school, and the test 
scores must be sent from the test center. They may not 
be submitted by the applicant. 

Information about the times and places at which the 
College Board test may be taken and an application for 
taking the test may be secured from the high school or 
from College Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, 
Princeton, New Jersey. 

Careful consideration will be given to the applicant's 
academic records, scores on tests, and evidences of 
character, purpose in life, and general fitness for college 
life at Wake Forest College. The College reserves the 
right to reject any application without explanation. 

A student who wishes to transfer from another college 
must be a graduate of a standard junior college or must 
furnish a certificate of honorable dismissal stating that 
the applicant is eligible in all respects to re-enter the 
college last attended. 

The applicant should fill out and return as early as 
practical the student's part of the application and 

59 



Admission 

certificate form supplied by the Director of Admissions 
on request, and should then give to the high school 
principal, superintendent, or other appropriate school 
official the other parts to be completed and sent to the 
Director of Admissions of Wake Forest College for the 
attention of the Committee on Admissions. 

An application fee of $10.00 to cover the cost of 
processing the application is required. This should 
accompany the application and will not be applied to 
later charges or refunded, in the event of failure to be 
admitted or of cancellation of the application. 

If possible, the completed application should be sent 
at least six months prior to the date on which the ap- 
plicant hopes to enroll in Wake Forest College, but not 
before September 15 of the applicant's senior year in 
high school. Except in case of emergency, the final date 
for making application for the spring semester is Jan- 
uary 15; for the fall semester, August 20. 

The minimum prescribed requirements for admission 
to all degrees are as follows: 

English 4 units 

One Foreign Language 2 units 

History (Social Studies) 2 units 

Mathematics: 

Algebra 1 X A or 2 units 

Geometry 1 unit 

Electives to bring the total to 16 units 

An applicant who fails to meet minimum require- 
ments in foreign languages or in geometry, but who 
has graduated with a satisfactory high school record 
and has made a satisfactory score on the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test, may be considered for admission.* One 
who is admitted without a prescribed requirement must 

* Students entering in September 1963, and thereafter, will be expected to have met 
the language and geometry requirements. 

60 



Admission 

remove the condition within one year by a course or 
courses taken in college without credit toward a degree. 

A student who is admitted from another college be- 
fore fully meeting the minimum prescribed require- 
ments outlined above for entering freshmen must re- 
move the entrance conditions during the first year at 
Wake Forest. 

A student who transfers from another college must 
have an overall average of at least C on all college work 
attempted. * 

When an applicant has received notice of acceptance 
for admission or re-admission to Wake Forest College, an 
admission deposit of $50.00 must be sent to the Director 
of Admissions of Wake Forest College not later than 
three weeks after the notice of acceptance is mailed. 
(Make checks payable to Wake Forest College.) Failure 
to pay this deposit within three weeks will be considered 
as indicating that the applicant does not intend to enter 
Wake Forest College. This deposit will be credited 
toward the applicant's college fees. It will be refunded, 
if the application for admission or re-admission is 
cancelled by the applicant and a written request for 
refund is received by the Director of Admissions of 
Wake Forest College not later than June 1 for the fall 
semester or November 1 for the spring semester. Re- 
funds will not be made after these dates. 

If a student is accepted for admission or re-admission 
after June 30 for the fall semester or after December 1 
for the spring semester, the admission deposit is due 
within two weeks of the date of acceptance. Deposits 
made after June 30 and December 1 are not refundable. 

No deposit is required of a student who expects to 
enroll for the summer session only. 

• Please see academic requirements for graduation, especially for one who has at- 
tended more than one college before applying for admission to Wake Forest College. 

61 



Classification 



Advanced Placement 

Wake Forest College recognizes college-level work 
done in high school by giving credit and placement on 
the basis of Advanced Placement Examinations of the 
College Entrance Board and such pertinent supple- 
mentary information as may be available. 

Exceptionally qualified applicants for advanced stand- 
ing may receive exemption from some basic courses 
with credit on the authorization of the department con- 
cerned. For the purposes of computing quality point 
ratios, etc., credit gained by advanced standing exami- 
nation is treated as credit transferred to Wake Forest 
College from another college. 

Admission to Advanced Standing 

Courses satisfactorily completed in other accredited 
colleges are accepted under the regulations that have 
been adopted by the faculty for the approval of such 
courses. In general, however, no credit is allowed for 
courses not found in the curriculum of Wake Forest 
College. All credits allowed for advanced standing 
are held in suspense until the candidate has spent one 
term in residence. The minimum residence requirement 
for a baccalaureate degree is two academic years — the 
senior year and one other. 

Classification 

Admission to the freshman class as a candidate for 
a degree requires a minimum of sixteen units of high 
school credits, with deficiencies on not more than two 
units of the entrance work prescribed for the degree. 
All entrance conditions, if any exist, must be removed 
before registration for the sophomore year. 

62 



Recitations 



The requirements for classification after the fresh- 
man year are as follows: 

Sophomore — the removal of all entrance conditions 
and the completion of not fewer than 25 hours of work 
toward a degree, with a minimum of 25 quality points; 
Junior — the completion of not fewer than 54 hours of 
work toward a degree, with a minimum of 54 quality 
points; Senior — not fewer than 95 hours of work to- 
ward a degree, with a minimum of 95 quality points. 

Procedure in Registering 

There are five steps in registration: (1) Securing from 
the Registrar's Office a permit to register and a sum- 
mary of prior record; (2) the payment of fees to the 
Treasurer; (3) consultation with an adviser, who gives 
such assistance as may be necessary in regard to the 
program of work; (4) sectioning of classes by depart- 
mental representatives; (5) appearance before the 
Registrar for approval of program and assignment to 
classes. 

No student is allowed to enter any class until he has 
completed his registration. 

Recitations per Week: Maximum and Minimum 
Requirements 

Sixteen credit hours a week, counting two hours of 
laboratory or field work as equal to one hour of reci- 
tation, are the maximum normally allowed freshmen. 
Seventeen credit hours a week are the maximum which 
sophomores, juniors and seniors may normally take. A 
student may register for as much as nineteen credit 
hours per semester provided that the additional hours 
over the normal maximum include only hours in the 

63 



Absences 

following courses: a one-hour physical education course, 
one music ensemble course, and Military Science. Ad- 
ditional work over the maximum is not otherwise allowed 
except by permission of the Dean, and then only to 
students whose records are superior. 

The minimum number of hours for which a student 
may register is twelve for the term unless he is given 
special permission because of exceptional conditions or 
because he is doing outside work to support himself in 
college. 

Enforcement of Regulations 

The enforcement of all regulations pertaining to 
academic matters is regarded as a function of the fac- 
ulty, or representatives of the faculty. A well-organized 
Student Government assumes responsibility, in co- 
operation with the Dean of the College, for the regu- 
lations of the honor system and various other matters 
involving personal conduct. In general, the regulations 
of the College are adapted to and intended for those 
who have reached such maturity that they may exer- 
cise self-control. All students are expected to be faith- 
ful in work, to be prompt and regular in attendance 
upon all their college duties, and to refrain from practices 
injurious to others. Those who neglect their work, 
or persist in conduct that brings reproach upon them- 
selves and upon the College, or disregard the rights 
and the welfare of their fellow students are required 
to withdraw from the College. 

Absences From Classes 
The regulations governing class attendance are in- 
tended to give the student special privileges within 
reasonable limits and at the same time to enforce neces- 
sary restrictions. 

64 



Absences 

By order of the faculty each instructor is required to 
make an accurate report of all absences, regardless of 
the circumstances under which they occurred, and the 
Registrar is instructed not to record quality points and 
credit hours without a complete report of attendance. 
The application of all penalties is made by the Registrar 
when he records the grades for the term. It is under- 
stood that absences are counted from the first meeting 
of the class, those who register late to be reported as 
absent from any previous class meetings which they have 
missed. 

(1) A student, unless he is on probation, is allowed 
each semester as many unexcused absences in each class 
as there are class meetings in a normal week. These 
absences must provide for minor emergencies and must 
include all absences which are merely for the student's 
convenience. 

(2) A student of junior or senior standing who is on 
the Dean's List for a given semester is granted the privi- 
lege the following semester of additional unexcused 
absences, provided that the total absences, excused and 
unexcused, in any course amount to less than 15% 
of the class periods in that course. 

(3) Members of athletic teams or other recognized 
organizations who are absent from class while repre- 
senting the College will be excused for these absences, 
provided that the total absences in any course amount 
to less than 1 5 per cent of the class periods in that course, 
and provided that these absences are certified by the 
proper faculty representative. 

(4) When a student is absent from class because of 
an emergency, he should immediately thereafter file with 
the Dean of the College an absence excuse request, to- 
gether with a statement of a physician or some other per- 

65 



Loss of Credit Hours 



son competent to certify the facts as to the emergency. 

(5) A student who is on academic probation is not 
allowed any unexcused absences. As a member of an 
athletic team or another recognized organization, he 
may be absent while representing the College as many 
times in each class as there are class meetings in a 
normal week, provided that these absences are certified 
by the proper faculty representative. 

(6) A student who is on probation for misconduct or 
for any violation of the student conduct code or student 
honor code is subject to such restrictions upon his at- 
tendance as may be imposed by the Executive Com- 
mittee or the Student Government, as appropriate. 

(7) For each absence not allowed as specified above, one 
quality point is deducted from the total earned in the course 
in which the absence occurred. 

(8) For an unexcused absence from a previously an- 
nounced test, regardless of the student's academic 
status, one quality point is deducted from the total 
earned in the course in which the absence occurred. 

(9) An absence from any class at the last meeting 
before or the first meeting after a holiday recess is 
recorded as two absences. 

Loss of Credit Hours 
After absences in any course amount to 25 per cent of 
the total class periods in that course, a student loses all 
credit for the course and is assigned a grade of F, except 
that, if all his absences are excused or otherwise per- 
missible under the College's absence regulations, he is 
dropped from the course and assigned a grade of "WP" 
or "WF" as appropriate. 



66 



Withdrawal 



Course Drops 

The last day for dropping a class without the grade 
of F is listed in the College calendar on page 3 of this 
Catalog. A student who wishes to drop any course 
before this date must consult the Registrar and his 
faculty adviser. After this date, if he wishes to drop a 
course, he must consult either the Dean of the College 
or the Dean of the School of Business Administration, as 
appropriate. If the Dean approves the request, he au- 
thorizes the student to discontinue the course. Except 
in the case of an emergency, the grade in the course will 
be recorded as F. 

If, at any time, a student shall drop any course with- 
out prior, written approval of the Dean, a grade of F for 
that course shall be reported by the instructor to the 
Registrar, and the student will be subject to academic 
probation for the following semester or to such other 
penalties as the Executive Committee of the faculty may 
impose. 

Withdrawal from College 

A student who finds it necessary to withdraw from 
the College is required to consult the Dean of the Col- 
lege and arrange official withdrawal. If the withdrawal 
occurs before mid-term, no grades are recorded in any 
of the student's courses. If it takes place after mid-term 
the student's grade in each course is recorded as "F," 
unless there is an emergency, in which case it is recorded 
as "WP" or "WF," depending on whether the student 
is passing or failing the course at the time of his with- 
drawal. "WP" and "WF" grades do not affect the stu- 
dent's credit hour or quality point totals, but they will 
be taken into consideration in case the student should 
at a later date seek readmission to the College. 

A student who withdraws from the College without 

67 



Probation 

first consulting the Dean will not be granted honorable 
dismissal and will be assigned grades of F in all his 
courses. 

Minimum Academic Requirements; Probation 

At the end of the fall term the following students will 
be placed on academic probation: 

(1) Those students who, having attempted 23 or 
fewer semester hours, have an over-all quality 
point ratio* of less than 0.5. 

(2) Those students who, having attempted no fewer 
than 24 and no more than 63 semester hours, have 
an over-all quality point ratio of less than 0.75. 

(3) Those students who, having attempted 64 or 
more semester hours, have an over-all quality 
point ratio of less than 0.9. 

A student thus placed on probation will normally be 
given the spring term and the summer session in order 
to remove himself from the probation list. During the 
period of probation he is not allowed any unexcused 
absences from class and is not permitted to be absent 
from chapel. He must also satisfy such other require- 
ments as may be imposed by the Executive Committee 
of the faculty. If he is a member of an athletic team or 
other recognized College organization, he will also be 
governed by the regulations in this catalog concerning 
"Absences from Classes." 

Before the beginning of the fall term the following students 
will be informed that they are academically ineligible to con- 
tinue in college: 

(7) Those students who, having attempted 47 or fewer 



* The quality point ratio is obtained by dividing the net quality points earned by 
the number of hours carried (whether passed or failed). 

68 



Probation 

semester hours, have an over-all quality point ratio of 
less than 0.5. 

(2) Those students who, having attempted no fewer than 48 
and no more than 87 semester hours, have an over-all 
quality point ratio of less than 0.75. 

(3) Those students who, having attempted 88 or more 
semester hours, have an over-all quality point ratio of 
less than 0.9. 

Under exceptional circumstances the Executive Com- 
mittee of the faculty may continue the eligibility on pro- 
bation of a student in the first category whose over- 
all quality point ratio is no less than 0.4, a student in 
the second category whose over-all quality point ratio 
is no less than 0.55, or a student in the third category 
whose over-all quality point ratio is no less than 0.75. 

In the determination of the number of semester hours 
a student has attempted, both with respect to his pro- 
bationary status and with respect to his continued 
eligibility, all work he has taken for credit at any col- 
lege will be counted. In the determination of his quality 
point ratio only his record at Wake Forest College will 
be considered. Non-credit courses will not be counted 
in either instance. 

The Executive Committee of the faculty may also 
place on probation or suspend from college at the end 
of any term any student whose record for that term has 
been unsatisfactory, particularly with regard to the 
number of courses passed and failed, or who has not at- 
tended class regularly or has otherwise ignored the rules 
and regulations of the College. 

Any student who has been separated from the Col- 
lege for academic reasons must remain out of college 
for at least one semester, after which he may apply for 
readmission. This application for readmission must be 

69 



Grades 

made to the Director of Admissions and approved by 
the Executive Committee of the faculty. There is, how- 
ever, no guarantee that the Committee's action will be 
favorable. On the contrary, the suspended student 
must accept the strong likelihood that readmission will 
not be granted. 

Examinations and Grades 

All examinations are conducted in accordance with 
the honor system adopted by the students and approved 
by the Faculty. Under this system the student is ex- 
pected not only to refrain from unfairness in any form 
but also to report to the Student Council anyone whom 
he knows to be guilty of cheating. Examination papers 
are accompanied by a signed statement that no aid 
has been given or received. 

In the system of grading, A represents exceptionally 
high achievement; B, superior achievement; C, average; 
D, below average; E, conditional failure; F, failure. 

Grade of I 

The grade of I (incomplete) may be assigned only 
when on account of illness or some other emergency 
a student does not complete the work of his course. If 
the work recorded as I is not completed within thirty 
days after the student enters for his next semester, the 
grade automatically becomes F. 

Grade of E 

A student who makes a grade of E on any course may 
be re-examined at any regular examination period with- 
in a year, or during the first week of the fall semester. No 
grade higher than D may be assigned as a result of a re- 

70 



Reports 

examination. A student who does not remove a con- 
ditional failure by one re-examination must repeat the 
course to secure credit. 

Repetition of Courses 

A student may not repeat for credit a course on which 
he has already received a grade of G or higher. 

Senior Conditions 

A candidate for graduation in his final semester who 
receives a grade of E at the close of the previous semester 
may apply to the Registrar for re-examination 30 days 
after the opening of the final semester and not less than 
30 days before its close. Such examination will be re- 
garded as a special examination and will entail a fee of 
$2.50. 

All conditions must be removed 30 days before the 
end of the last term of the student's graduation year. 
The name of a candidate for graduation who has a 
condition after that date is dropped from the roll of the 
class. 

If a student receives a grade of E in a course in the 
final term of his graduation year, he is not allowed a 
re-examination before the next examination period. 

Reports 

A mid-term report is given to the student and a copy 
is sent to the parent or guardian of each student who is 
doing unsatisfactory work. At the end of each term a 
final report of grades and attendance is given to the 
student, and a copy is sent to the parent or guardian. 



71 



Transcripts 

The Dean's List 

The Dean's List will be issued at the end of each 
semester by the Dean of the College and the Dean of 
the School of Business Administration and will include 
all full-time students who have made a quality point 
ratio of 2.0 for the semester. Grades earned during a 
summer session are not considered in the preparation of 
the List. 

Juniors and seniors on the Dean's List for a given 
semester are granted the privilege the following semester 
of additional unexcused absences, provided that the 
total absences, excused and unexcused, in any course 
amount to less than 15 per cent of the class periods in 
that course. 

Graduation Distinctions 

Under the quality point system, graduation dis- 
tinctions are determined as follows: 

A candidate for a baccalaureate degree who is credited 
with quality points which give him a ratio of not less 
than 2.80, in relation to the total semester hours at- 
tempted, shall be graduated with the distinction summa 
cum laude; not less than 2.50, magna cum laude; not less 
than 2.00, cum laude. The entire record of a student is 
considered, with the understanding that a transfer 
student may receive no distinction which requires a 
quality point ratio greater than that earned in Wake 
Forest College. 

Transcripts of Student Records 

One transcript of the record of each student in the 
College is issued by the Registrar without charge. For 
each additional transcript there is a charge of one dollar. 

72 



Veterans 

Summer Session Elsewhere 

A student who desires to attend summer session in 
another college must secure the advance approval of 
the Registrar and the Chairman of the department 
concerned. 

A transcript of the record is required for posting at 
the close of the summer session. 

Center for Psychological Services 

The Center provides specialized services in educa- 
tional-vocational testing and counseling, and in personal 
adjustment counseling. These services provide evidence 
of the student's aptitudes, interests, and achievements 
and assist him in making the most of his opportunities 
for academic and personal development while in college. 
The Center, with offices in Efird Hall, is staffed by 
professionally trained psychologists. There is no charge 
to the full time student for Center services. 

Veterans 

During the current session, the College has enrolled 
303 veterans. Applicants who need information con- 
cerning educational benefits for veterans should consult 
the nearest regional office of the Veterans Administra- 
tion. This office for North Carolina is located at 310 
West Fourth Street, Winston-Salem. 

Benefits are administered under Public Law 550, 
82nd Congress, and Public Law 894, 81st Congress 
(disabled veterans). An education and training al- 
lowance is paid monthly to the veteran, and he pays his 
College expenses from such allowance, the College 
having no financial connection with the Veterans Ad- 
ministration on the veteran's charges. In order to receive 

73 



Veterans 

the full monthly subsistence allowance, a veteran 
enrolled under Public Law 550 must be enrolled for at 
least 14 semester hours, not more than two of which 
may be non-credit hours. 

Properly qualified veterans should obtain a Certificate 
of Education and Training from the Veterans Ad- 
ministration to present to the College at registration, 
as the College is required to certify, on the basis of 
such certificate, that the veteran is actually enrolled 
and in attendance. 

Veterans must have commenced training by August 
20, 1954, or the date three years from date of discharge, 
whichever is later. No training will be afforded beyond 
eight years after the official end of the Korean conflict 
or eight years from date of discharge, whichever is the 
later date. 

Veterans who believe they may be entitled to some 
credit for special service courses may consult the Regis- 
trar for advice and suggestions for procedure. 



74 



COLLEGE CHARGES AND FINANCIAL 
ARRANGEMENTS 

(Veterans: See statement on page 73) 

General Statement. Statements in this Bulletin con- 
cerning expenses are not to be regarded as forming an 
irrevocable contract between the student and the Col- 
lege. The College reserves the right to change without 
notice the cost of instruction at any time within the 
student's term of residence. 

Payment and Settlement of Accounts. Each student is 
responsible for the settlement of his own account. Begin- 
ning on page 76, statements of charges made are listed, 
and the student is expected to meet the schedules of 
payment therefor and to settle promptly all bills ren- 
dered. 

The College does not extend credit or make arrange- 
ments for payment of charges other than those set out 
in this Bulletin. Plans for financing college charges are 
offered by the First- Citizens Bank and Trust Company, 
Raleigh, North Carolina, and by Wachovia Bank and 
Trust Company, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. In- 
formation may be obtained by writing directly to these 
banks. 

The College expects students to pay tuition and other 
charges when due or to arrange financing of charges as 
explained in the preceding paragraph. 

Faculty regulations require that a student's College 
account must be settled in full before he is entitled to 
receive his grades, a transcript of his record, a diploma, 
or to register for the succeeding semester. 

Withdrawal. Students withdrawing must follow the 
procedure set forth on page 67 and must present their 

75 



Charges 

student activity books to the Treasurer before any claim 
for refund may be considered. In general, the refund is on 
a pro rata basis if withdrawal occurs within 30 days from the 
first day of registration as indicated in the College calendar on 
page 3. 

Bank Accounts and Check-Cashing. Students will greatly 
facilitate their financial arrangements by opening a 
checking account with the Wake Forest Office of the 
Wachovia Bank and Trust Company, located on the 
campus, since the College cannot undertake to cash 
checks. 

Checks and money orders presented in payment of 
accounts should be made payable to WAKE FOREST 
COLLEGE. 

Meals, Books, and Laundry. Meals and books are paid 
for as obtained. The College operates a book store and 
a cafeteria, both of which are located on the campus. 
The following are estimated figures for the periods in- 
dicated: 

School Summer 

Tear Session 

Board (at rate of $1.65-$2.00 

daily) $500-$550 $ 1 20-$ 1 50 

Books $ 75-S100 $ 35-$ 50 

Laundry is arranged for privately. A laundry oper- 
ated by a Winston-Salem firm is located in Charles E. 
Taylor Dormitory. 

School of Arts and Sciences and School of Business 
Administration 

Charges for the Regular School Tear 

All charges are due and payable at registration un- 
less otherwise indicated. 

76 



Charges 

Fall Spring Total 

Semester Semester for Year 

Tuition 1 $150. 00 2 $150. 00 3 $300.00 

General Fee 1 150.00 150.00 300.00 

Dormitory Room Rental 1 00 . 00 4 1 00 . 00 4 200 . 00 

Student Union Fee 1 .50 1 .50 3.00 

$401.50 $401.50 $803.00 

Deduct admission deposit ($50.00) or reservation deposit ($25.00) 
from above charges, if such deposits are paid. See page 79. 

The general fee is required of all students at registra- 
tion. It is intended to bear in part the total cost of op- 
erations of the College. It specifically includes such 
items as would normally require the payment of a fee 
namely, libraries, laboratories, admission to all inter- 
collegiate athletic contests at Wake Forest College (when 
student activity book is presented), and to certain 
student activities, including religious and dramatic 
organizations, cost of student publications, consisting of 
the yearbook, The Howler, and subscription prices of 
$1.50 annually for the campus magazine, The Student, 
and $2.50 annually for the student newspaper, Old 
Gold & Black. It further provides for the attendance of 
the College physician and nurses in the College hospital 
for temporary emergencies. 

The Student Union fee is required of all students at 
registration. It is intended to bear in part the total cost 
of the operation of the Student Union (see page 1 09) . 



1 Part-time students (those enrolled for less than 12 semester hours) pay a flat charge 
of $18.50 per semester hour in lieu of tuition and general fee. Part-time students are not 
entitled to claim the concessions listed on page 95 nor are they entitled to admission to 
athletic contests and receipt of publications as are full-time students. 

2 May be deferred until November 1. 

3 May be deferred until March 1. 

4 Single room $110.00 

Double room occupied as single room $150.00 



77 



Charges 

Charges for the Summer Session 

A bulletin of the Summer Session is published in 
March of each year and may be obtained by writing 
Dean of the Summer Session, Wake Forest College, 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina. This bulletin should 
be consulted for detailed information concerning charges 
and courses. 

All charges are due and payable at registration. 



First 
Session 

Summer School Fee 1 $ 60.00 2 

Dormitory Room Rental . 30.00 


Second 

Session 

$ 60.00 2 

30.00 


Total 

$120.00 

60.00 


TOTAL $ 90.00 

School of Law 


$ 90.00 


$180.00 



Charges for the Regular School Tear 

The Bulletin of the School of Law should be consulted 
for detailed information. A copy may be obtained by 
addressing the Dean of the School of Law, Wake Forest 
College, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 

All charges are due and payable at registration. 

Fall Spring Total 

Semester Semester for Tear 

Tuition 3 $275.00 $275.00 $550.00 

Dormitory Room Rental . 100.00 4 100.00* 200.00 



$375.00 $375.00 $750.00 

Deduct admission deposit ($50.00) or reservation deposit ($25.00) 
from above charges, if such deposits are paid. See page 79. 



1 Part-time students (those enrolled for 3 semester hours or less) pay a flat charge of 
$12.50 per semester hour. 

1 No concessions or scholarships are available in the summer session, except that 
the charge to public school teachers is $45.00 per session when duly authorized by the 
Dean of the Summer Session. 

• Part-time students (those enrolled for 7 semester hours or less) pay a flat charge of 
4137.50. 

* Single room— $110.00. 

Double room occupied as a single room — $150.00 

78 



Charges 

No general fee is charged, but students in the School 
of Law have the same privileges described on page 77 
as do students in the School of Arts and Sciences and 
the School of Business Administration. 

Charges for the Summer Session 

The summer term in the School of Law consists of 
one nine- week session. 

Tuition' $100.00 

Dormitory Room Rental 30.00 

TOTAL $130.00 

Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

The Bulletin of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine 
should be consulted for information as to expenses. Re- 
quests therefor should be addressed to the Dean of the 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest 
College, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 

Other College Charges 

Information concerning the charges listed below will 
be found immediately following the table. 

*Admission Application Fee $10.00 

*Admission Deposit 50.00 

Applied Music (amounts shown 
are per semester) : 
One lesson per week in piano, 

organ, or violin 72.00 

One lesson per week in voice . . 60.00 

1 Part-time students (those enrolled for 3 semester hours or less) pay a flat charge of 
$30.00. 
* Not required in the Summer Session. 

79 



Charges 

Class instruction in voice or 
band and orchestra instru- 
ments (minimum class total 4 

students) per student $30.00 

Practice studio rental (one hour 

daily) 6.00 

Practice studio rental (two 

hours daily) 10.00 

Organ practice (one hour 

daily) 10.00 

Organ practice (two hours 

daily) 14.00 

Other instrument rental 5.00 

Dormitory Damage and Repairs 

As charged by Director of Residences 

Graduation Fee 10.00 

Hospital Bed and Board Charge. 3.00 daily 

Key Deposit 3.00 each 

Library Fines As charged by Library 

*Reservation Deposit 25.00 

Room Change Fees: 

Authorized Changes 5.00 

Unauthorized Changes 20.00 

ROTC Deposit 20.00 

Special Examination 2.50 

Student Apartment Rental 60.00 monthly 

Traffic Fines: 

Unregistered Vehicle 10.00 per violation 

Illegal Parking 2. CO per violation 

Trailer Park Rental 30.00 p^r semester 

Transcripts (first copy is free) . . . 1.00 each 

Admission Application Fee. Required with each appli- 



*Not required in the summer 

80 



Charges 

cation for admission to the School of Arts and Sciences 
to cover costs of processing. Non-refundable. 

Admission Deposit. Required of each student entering 
for the first time, or re-entering after a period of non- 
attendance, the School of Arts and Sciences and the 
School of Law. Must be sent to the Director of Admis- 
sions (or to the Treasurer, in the case of law students) 
within three weeks after acceptance for admission or 
readmission. The deposit is credited to the student's 
college charges for the semester for which he has been 
accepted for admission. It is refunded if the Director of 
Admissions (or the Dean of the School of Law in the 
case of law students) is notified in writing prior to June 
1 for the fall semester and November 1 for the spring 
semester, of cancellation of plans to enter. No officer of 
the College has authority to modify these refund dates. 

Applied Music. Required in addition to tuition of 
students enrolling for individual or class study in ap- 
plied music as described in the offering of the Depart- 
ment of Music (p. 186). Payable in the Treasurer's office 
not later than November 1 and March 1, respectively, 
for the fall and spring semesters. 

Dormitory Damages and Repairs. The student is charged 
for damage to his room or college property in accordance 
with Dormitory Rule 4 appearing on page 86. These 
charges may be appealed to the Board of Dormitory 
Damage Appeals if the student feels they are not merited. 

Graduation Fee. Required of all students who are 
candidates for degrees, whether or not they are present 
for the graduation exercises, and must be paid prior to 
the date of graduation. Covers the cost of diploma, 
academic costume, and other expenses pertaining to 
graduation. 

81 



Charges 

Hospital Bed and Board Charge. Charged to students 
when confined to the College Hospital. An additional 
charge is made for special surgeon or special nurse, 
when their services are required, and for special and 
expensive drugs. The provision for hospital service and 
the attendance of a physician applies to the student only 
and cannot be extended to members of his family. 

Key Deposit. Required for each key issued to a dormi- 
tory room or student apartment. Refunded when key 
is returned to the Director of Residences. 

Library Fines. Charges for overdue and lost books 
and for violation of other Library regulations. Payable 
in the Library. 

Reservation Deposit. Students enrolled in the spring 
semester who expect to return for the next regular ses- 
sion beginning in September are required to pay a 
reservation deposit at a date set by the Treasurer. It is 
credited to the student's college charges and will be 
refunded under the same conditions specified for the 
admission deposit, except that refunds will be made if 
requested prior to June 30. 

Room Change Fees. A charge of $5.00 is incurred for 
authorized room changes made after October 1 in the 
fall semester, after February 15 in the spring semester, 
and after the first week of each summer session. An 
authorized room change is one which has been made 
with the permission of the Director of Residences or the 
Dean of Women, as appropriate. A fine of $20.00 is in- 
curred for any unauthorized change. 

ROTC Deposit. Required of each student enrolled 
in an ROTC course before equipment may be issued to 
him. Refunded at the end of the school year or upon 

82 



Food Services 



withdrawal from the course, less a cleaning charge and 
less any loss or damage, fair wear and tear excepted. If 
loss or damage exceeds $20.00, the deposit is forfeited, 
and the student is responsible for the excess over $20.00. 

Special Examination. Required for each special ex- 
amination taken to remove a course condition. 

Student Apartment Rental. Required to be paid monthly 
in accordance with written lease executed for the apart- 
ment between the student and the Director of Residences 
acting on behalf of the College. 

Traffic Fines. Assessed against students violating 
parking regulations, copies of which are obtainable from 
the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. May be 
appealed to the Board of Traffic Appeals. 

Trailer Park Rental. Required to be paid in accord- 
ance with written lease executed for college trailer park 
space between the student and the Director of Resi- 
dences acting on behalf of the College. 

Transcripts. The first copy of a student's record is 
issued free of charge. Subsequent copies cost $1 each. 
Transcripts are requested from the Registrar. 

Food Services 
Three types of food services are offered to the students 
of Wake Forest College — cafeteria, grill, and table 
service. The cafeteria lines feature a multiple choice 
menu planned and supervised by a trained home 
economist. The grill with its soda shop operates until 
10:30 p.m. week nights and is a favorite spot for students 
to gather. The Magnolia Room is the table service 
dining room giving the students a quiet place to enjoy 
eating and offering a menu with greater variety, also 

83 



Housing 

foods prepared to order. The average student spends 
from $1.65-$2.00 per day for food, exclusive of soda 
shop purchases. 

Housing 

All unmarried undergraduate students who do not 
live in Winston-Salem or near Winston-Salem with their 
parents must live on the campus unless given permission 
in writing to the contrary by the Dean of the College 
or the Dean of Women. 

Student Apartments and Trailer Park 

An apartment building containing fifty-six apart- 
ments is located on the northwest edge of the campus. A 
trailer park containing fifty-one spaces is located on 
the east side of the campus. The apartment and trailer 
park are available for married couples, who must actu- 
ally reside therein. 

Application for apartment and trailer space must be 
made to the Director of Residences, who maintains a 
waiting list. Assignment is made in order of priority of 
application, and a lease is executed by the student and 
the College. 

Apartment and trailer space is available only to bona 
fide students of Wake Forest College. 

Rooms — Men 

The rent is SI 00.00 per semester per student for 
double rooms, SI 10.00 per semester for single rooms and 
$150.00 for double rooms occupied as single rooms, 
due and payable at registration and may not be de- 
ferred. Room rental is not refunded upon withdrawal. 

See below for the rules governing the use of dormi- 
tory rooms. 

84 



Dormitory Rules 



Rooms — Women 

Married women students are not ordinarily permitted 
to live in the dormitories. Single women students in the 
professional schools may live in quarters approved by 
the Dean of Women. 

The assignment of rooms to women students is made 
by the Dean of Women after admission requirements 
have been completed. Notification of assignments is 
generally made in the summer preceding the opening 
of the session in September. 

The rent is $1 00.00 per semester per student for 
double rooms and $1 10.00 per semester for single rooms, 
due and payable at registration, and may not be de- 
ferred. Room rental is not refunded upon withdrawal. 

See below for the rules governing the use of dormi- 
tory rooms. 

Dormitory Rules 

The following rules apply to the use of dormitory 
rooms: 

1. The period for which rooms are rented is one 
semester; however, any student remaining in the same 
room for the second semester will not need to sign a 
new room contract as the contract provides for auto- 
matic renewal to cover the room assignment for the 
second semester. The College reserves the right to change 
or cancel room assignments in the interest of order, 
health, discipline, or other urgent reasons. 

Each student, in accepting h is/her assignment, agrees 
to abide by this contract, the Constitution of the 
Student Body, and the dormitory regulations printed 
on the reverse side of the contract, and to permit, in his 
presence, duly authorized personnel to inspect his room 
and any effects in such room. Authorized personnel 

85 



Dormitory Rules 



may enter rooms at any time to check for cleanliness or 
to make necessary repairs, or when it appears to the 
College that the safety of the students is endangered or 
where property damage is involved. 

2. All payments for room rent are made at registra- 
tion. Room rental is not refunded upon withdrawal. 
The occupant may not sublet the room to another 
student. 

3. A woman student may exchange her room only 
with the advance written approval of the Dean of 
Women. A non-fraternity man may exchange his room 
only with the advance written approval of the Director 
of Residences. A fraternity man living in a fraternity 
section must follow the procedure outlined in the 
fraternity contract. 

A charge of $5.00 will be incurred for authorized 
room changes made after October 1 in the fall semester 
and after February 15 in the spring semester. (A charge 
of $5.00 will be incurred for all authorized changes 
made after the first week of summer school.) 

A fine of $20.00 will be incurred for any exchange 
made otherwise. 

4. The student will be charged for any damages 
which occur to his room or furnishings, for any damages 
on a pro rata basis which may occur to his suite, and 
for all damages caused by his neglect, misuse, or abuse 
of any part of the college property. Any student may 
appeal his dormitory damage charge to the Board of 
Dormitory Damage Appeals. 

5. College furniture or furnishings are not to be 
moved from the room in which they have been placed 
by the College. 

86 



Regulations 

6. All residents must secure keys for dormitory rooms 
at the Office of the Director of Residences. All issues and 
exchanges must be made at the office. The use or pos- 
session of an unauthorized key is forbidden. A deposit of 
$3.00 is required for a key, and this may be recovered by 
returning the key to the Director of Residences when 
leaving college. All keys must be returned, even though 
the student plans to occupy the same room for the 
summer session or for the ensuing fall semester. Failure 
to return a room key under these circumstances leaves 
the student liable for any damages which may occur 
to the room or suite. 

7. The dormitories will open at noon on the first 
day of the fall semester. The dormitories will be closed 
at noon on the first day of the Christmas holidays and 
will reopen at noon on the last day of the Christmas 
holidays. The dormitories will close at noon on the day 
after Graduation Day. Dormitories will be open at noon 
of the day prior to the opening of the summer session 
and will close at 6 p.m. on the day the summer session 
ends. Occupancy of a room otherwise may be permitted 
only in an extreme emergency and must have the written 
approval of the Director of Residences or the Dean of 
Women, as appropriate, for which a charge of $1.00 
will be made for each day or fraction thereof. 

8. The College assumes no liability for loss or damage 
to personal property. 

Regulations 

1. Only bona fide students of Wake Forest College 
may reside in the dormitories. 

2. The College furnishes the principal articles of 
furniture. One additional small chest, table or chair 



87 



Regulations 

may be allowed if written request is made (furnishing a 
description of the item) to the Director of Residences or 
the Dean of Women, as appropriate, and written ap- 
proval is given. Rugs are not allowed. Lamps and 
curtains or draperies (installed according to College 
regulations) are permissible. Furnishings are not to be 
used for other than the intended purpose and beds are 
not to be disassembled. Each student will supply his 
own linen (for single beds), desk lamp and bulbs, and 
wastebasket. 

3. Curtains, draperies, pictures, pennants and clip- 
pings must be hung from the picture molding and not 
tacked or pasted on walls or woodwork. 

4. Trunks and heavy luggage should be stored in 
trunk rooms. 

5. No electrical or other type of equipment may be 
kept or used in a room which will in any way damage 
the room or its furnishings. No window fans or air 
conditioning units may be installed without the written 
permission of the Director of Residences. No cooking 
or refrigerating equipment or electric irons may be 
kept or used in a room. 

6. It is forbidden to possess or use on the campus of 
this College any intoxicating liquors, wines or beer or 
any fire crackers or other explosives. Contraband will 
be confiscated. Any form of gambling is forbidden. 
Animals or fowl are not allowed in the dormitories. 

7. Firearms are prohibited in the dormitories or on 
the campus except for instructional purposes connected 
with the ROTC unit. 

8. Playing football, baseball, softball, golf, or any 

88 



Regulations 

other sport is forbidden in the dormitory areas and 
must be confined to designated areas. 

9. Women are not permitted in the dormitory section 
of men's dormitories. 

10. The use of dormitory rooms as sales offices or 
storerooms, or the solicitation of sales or gifts within 
the buildings or grounds, is prohibited without per- 
mission of the Dean's office. 

11. No aerials of any type may be installed on any 
College buildings without the prior written permission 
of the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 

12. Students are expected to cooperate with the 
campus guards and to identify themselves upon the 
request of a guard. Failure to do so will be construed as 
misconduct. 

13. Each student is expected to display his name in 
the cardholder on the door. 

14. Application for repairs should be made to the 
Housekeepers or at the office of the Director of Resi- 
dences. 

15. Any student who moves from any dormitory 
room relinquishes all rights to any further use of the 
room. 

16. Students are expected to refrain at all times from 
making excessive noise, either in person or by radios, 
record players or other instruments capable of causing 
noise. Students shall not in any way interfere with the 
comfort or rights of other students. 

17. Students who fail to comply with these regula- 
tions may forfeit their right to live in the dormitory. 



89 



SCHOLARSHIPS, CONCESSIONS 
AND LOAN FUNDS 

By regulation of the Board of Trustees, all scholar- 
ships and concessions (remitted tuition) must be ap- 
proved by the Committee on Scholarships and Student 
Aid. The Committee requires that applications for 
scholarships and concessions be made on forms obtain- 
able by addressing the Committee at Box 7305, Winston- 
Salem, N. C. 

Concessions and scholarships supported by funds of 
the College are not granted to students enrolled in the 
professional schools of law and medicine. 

Only one scholarship or concession supported by 
College funds may be granted to any one person. 

To receive consideration for a scholarship or con- 
cession, the applicant must either be a registered student 
in Wake Forest College or have been accepted for 
admission. 

Need is a factor in the award of virtually all scholar- 
ships, and each applicant must file a financial statement 
as part of his application for the scholarship. 

The Committee reserves the right to revoke any 
scholarship or concession for unworthy achievement. 

No scholarship or concession is automatically renew- 
able. Application must be made each year. 

Applicants should submit applications sufficiently 
early so that final action will have been taken before 
the beginning of the school year. 

Special regulations govern the use of the Ministerial 
Aid Fund. 

Scholarships 

Junius Calvin Brown Scholarship. Donated by Mr. 
Junius Calvin Brown of Madison, North Carolina, in 

90 



Scholarships 



honor of his wife, Eliza Pratt Brown. The fund shall 
be used to assist needy, worthy, and deserving students 
from North Carolina, with preference being given to 
students from the town of Madison and Rockingham 
County. There is approximately $1,000 available for 
1961-1962. 

Burlington Industries Scholarship. Donated by Bur- 
lington Industries Foundation, this scholarship is avail- 
able to one who will have junior standing in September 
1961, has done all previous work at Wake Forest and 
has an average of 2.0 or better. Leadership, scholarship, 
and need are considered in making the award. The 
value of the scholarship is $1,000.00, with half of this 
amount available in each of the junior and senior years. 

The J. G. Carroll Memorial Athletic Scholarship. A fund 
donated in memory of Professor J. G. "Pop" Carroll, 
former Associate Professor of Mathematics. The award 
will be made to some deserving athlete who is not on a 
regular athletic scholarship. Approximately $100 is 
available for 1961-1962. 

College Scholarships. These scholarships, in the amounts 
of $100 to $600 each, are available to freshmen and 
upperclassmen presenting satisfactory academic records 
and evidence of need. 

The Lecausey P. and Lula H. Freeman Scholarship. 
Donated by Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Singleton, Raleigh, 
North Carolina, in memory of the parents of Mrs. 
Singleton. One scholarship is available to a student 
who may be a freshman, sophomore, or junior, and 
whose home is within the West Chowan Baptist Associ- 
ation of North Carolina with preference to Bertie 
County students, on the basis of need and ability. If 
no qualified applicant appears from the West Chowan 

91 



Scholarships 

Association, then residents of the Roanoke Association 
may be considered. The scholarship is renewable on 
the basis of need and ability for all school years except 
the senior year. Approximately $200 will be available 
for 1961-1962. 

George Foster Hankins Scholarships — Freshmen. These 
scholarships were made possible by the late Colonel 
George Foster Hankins of Lexington, N. C. Applicants 
must be residents of North Carolina or children of Wake 
Forest alumni residing in other states. Preference will 
be given to residents of Davidson County, North Caro- 
lina. Only high school seniors are eligible to compete 
and must request the necessary application forms before 
December 1 of their senior year. The value of these 
scholarships will range up to $1,200. 

George Foster Hankins Scholarships — Upper classmen. Up- 
perclassmen are eligible for Hankins Scholarships. 
However, they must have been enrolled in Wake Forest 
College for at least one semester before they may apply 
as upperclassmen. Applications must be on file with 
the Scholarships Committee no later than May 1 of 
each year for the following school year, and preference 
will be given to applicants from Davidson County, 
North Carolina. The amount of the award will vary 
according to the student's need as determined from 
the financial statement required to be submitted with his 
application. 

Frank P. Hobgood Scholarship. This scholarship, do- 
nated by Mrs. Kate H. Hobgood of Reidsville, North 
Carolina, in memory of her husband, is available to 
those who qualify on "the basis of character, purpose, 
intelligence, and need, with preference being given to 
those who plan to enter the ministry, do religious work, 

92 



Scholarships 

become teachers, or become lawyers, the preference 
being in the order named." Applicants must be legal 
residents of the city of Reidsville or live within 10 miles 
of that city and must be recommended by the deacons of 
the First Baptist Church of Reidsville. For 1961-1962, 
approximately $500 will be available. 

Junior College Scholarships. One scholarship is available 
each year to a graduate of each of the junior colleges of 
the North Carolina Baptist State Convention, in the 
amount of $150. The recipient must rank in the upper 
one-fourth of the junior college graduating class. 
Awarded only on the recommendation of the president 
of the junior college. 

Thurman D. Kitchin Scholarship. Donated by the 
Interfraternity Council in memory of the late Thur- 
man D. Kitchin, President of Wake Forest College 
from 1930 to 1950, it is available to a male freshman 
student presenting a high school record of superior 
grade and evidence of need. The amount of $300 is 
available for 1961-1962. 

Roy A. Miller, HI, Scholarship. Donated by Dr. and 
Mrs. Roy A. Miller of New Bern, North Carolina, in 
memory of Roy A. Miller, III, the amount of $70 is 
available each semester to a ministerial student selected 
on the basis of merit and need. 

Norfleet Scholarship. Donated by Mr. Eustace Norfleet 
of Wilmington, North Carolina, in memory of his 
parents, John A. and Mary Pope Norfleet, four scholar- 
ships are available in the amount of $200 each to 
"deserving and promising students desiring to attend 
Wake Forest College and needing financial assistance." 

Dorothea van Deusen Opdyke Fund. This fund is a 

93 



Scholarships 



bequest left to the Southern Baptist Convention by 
Mrs. Ida Reed Opdyke of Jamestown, New York, as 
a memorial to her daughter, Dorothea van Deusen 
Opdyke, and is to be used for the education of mountain 
people. Awards are made by the Opdyke Scholarship 
Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention upon 
the recommendation of the College. Ordinarily, two 
scholarships in the amount of SI 50 each are available 
each school year. 

Benjamin Wingate Par ham Scholarship. This fund was 
donated by Mrs. Kate J. Parham of Oxford, North 
Carolina, in memory of her husband. One scholarship 
shall be awarded in each school year on the basis of both 
ability and need. It may be renewed for succeeding 
years. The amount of $1,000 is available for 1961-1962. 

William Louis Poteat Scholarships. Five scholarships will 
be awarded annually to the graduates of the Baptist 
junior colleges in North Carolina. Applicants must re- 
quest the necessary application forms before December 
15 of their sophomore year. The winners will be selected 
from applicants who will be invited to the campus 
in early spring for competitive tests and interviews. 
Each scholarship will range up to $500 depending on 
need as determined from a financial statement submitted 
by each applicant with the application. It may be re- 
newed for the senior year. 

Oliver D. and Caroline E. Revell Memorial Scholarship 
Fund. Created under the will of the late Oliver D. 
Revell of Buncombe County, North Carolina, this fund 
makes available $100 per year to one person preparing 
for the ministry or full-time religious work. 

Kate B. Reynolds Memorial Scholarships. Donated in 
memory of the late Mrs. Kate B. Reynolds. Applicants 

94 



Concessions 



must be residents of Forsyth County, North Carolina, 
who without financial aid would be unable to obtain 
education beyond high school. Preference will be given 
to men. Four scholarships of $500 each will be awarded 
for the 1961-1962 school year. 

The Saddye Stephenson Sykes Scholarship. Donated by 
Dr. Charles L. Sykes and Dr. Ralph J. Sykes in memory 
of their mother, Mrs. Saddye Stephenson Sykes, one 
scholarship will be awarded each year on the basis of 
Christian character, academic proficiency, and financial 
need. Preference will be given to freshmen from the 
State of North Carolina. It may be renewable each 
year. Approximately $300 will be available for 1961- 
1962. 

Jesse A. Williams Scholarships. Created under the will 
of the late Jesse A. Williams of Union County, North 
Carolina, this fund provides scholarships in amounts 
of up to $1,200 per year. Preference will be given to 
deserving students of Union County. 

Charles Littell Wilson Scholarship. Created under the 
will of Mrs. Jennie Mayes Wilson in memory of her 
husband, the late Charles Littell Wilson, this fund makes 
available one freshman scholarship each year ranging 
from $200 to $600. 

Concessions 

Ministerial Students. Granted on the following con- 
ditions: (1) Written recommendation or license to 
preach authorized by the applicant's own church body 
and (2) signature by the applicant of an agreement to 
pay tuition, with interest, in the event that he does 
not serve five years in the ministry within twelve years 
from the last date of attendance at Wake Forest, subject 
to cancellation in the event of death. Value, $300.00. 

95 



Loan Funds 

Children of Ministers. Awards to those whose fathers 
make their living chiefly by the ministry. The concession 
may be granted for not more than four school years. 
Value, $150.00. 

Rehabilitation Students. Awarded to physically handi- 
capped students who have (1) secured the necessary 
letter of approval from the North Carolina Division of 
Vocational Rehabilitation, Raleigh, and (2) filed ap- 
plication for the concession on tuition. The general fee 
is paid by the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. 
Value, $300.00. 

Students' Wives. Awarded to wives of students in 
Wake Forest College for not more than four school 
years or the equivalent. Becomes void if the husband 
ceases to be enrolled. Value, $150.00. 

Loan Funds 

Bushnell Baptist Church Loan Fund. Established in 
1945 with funds supplied by the Bushnell Baptist 
Church of Fontana Dam, North Carolina, for needy 
students. 

Council Fund. Established in 1935 by Mr. C. T. 
Council of Durham, North Carolina, for the aid of 
senior students. 

James W. Denmark Loan Fund. This fund was origi- 
nated by the late James William Denmark of Dudley, 
North Carolina, in 1875, and is available to qualified 
students after at least one semester's work in the College. 
Preference is given to students from North Carolina. 
The amount available does not exceed $500 each year 
and $1,500 during the entire period of enrollment. 

Olivia Dunn Student Loan Fund. Established under the 



96 



Loan Funds 

will of Miss Birdie Dunn of Wake County, North 
Carolina, in memory of her mother, to be used as a 
loan fund for worthy students. 

Duplin County Loan Fund. This loan fund was donated 
in 1942 by friends of the College who wish to remain 
anonymous and is limited to students from Duplin 
County, North Carolina. 

Elliott B. Earnshaw Loan Fund. Established by the 
Board of Trustees of Wake Forest College as a memorial 
to the late E. B. Earnshaw, Bursar of Wake Forest 
College. 

Friendly Student Loan Fund. The fund was established 
in 1948 by Miss Nell E. Stinson of Raleigh, North 
Carolina, in memory of her sister, Mary Belle Stinson 
Michael, for the benefit of worthy students who need 
financial aid. Not more than $100.00 is available to 
any one student in the same school year. 

Grover Carroll Loan Fund. Donated by Lt. Col. and 
Mrs. Robert C. Wells in memory of the late James 
Grover Carroll, Associate Professor of Mathematics at 
Wake Forest College, the sum of $1,000 is available, the 
principal and interest of which may be loaned at 4% 
interest to worthy students who would otherwise be 
unable to completely finance a college education. 

George Foster Hankins Loan Fund. Established under 
the will of the late Colonel George Foster Hankins of 
Lexington, North Carolina, with preference to be given 
to applicants from Davidson County, North Carolina. 

Thomas M. Hunter, Jr., Memorial Scholarship. Estab- 
lished in 1948 by Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Hunter of 
Fayetteville, North Carolina, as a loan scholarship in 

97 



Loan Funds 

memory of their son. The loan scholarship is available 
for students enrolled in the Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine of Wake Forest College who are preparing 
to become medical missionaries. 

Edna Tyner Langston Fund. This fund, established in 
1942 by Dr. Henry J. Langston of Danville, Virginia, 
in memory of his wife, is available to a student agreed 
upon by the donor and the college. 

The National Defense Student Loan Program. This fund, 
created under the National Defense Education Act of 
1958, makes available loans up to $1,000 per year for 
students in need of financial assistance. The law further 
provides that special consideration in the selection of 
loan recipients be given to students with a superior aca- 
demic background who express a desire to teach in ele- 
mentary or secondary schools, and whose academic 
background indicates a superior capacity or preparation 
in science, mathematics, engineering, or a modern 
foreign language. 

Watts Norton Loan Fund. Established in 1949 by Mr. 
L. Watts Norton of Durham, North Carolina. For the 
benefit of worthy young people attending the School of 
Religion who need financial assistance. 

The Powers Fund. This fund was endowed by Dr. 
Frank P. Powers of Raleigh, North Carolina, in 1944 
as a memorial to his parents, Frank P. and Effie Reade 
Powers, and is for the benefit of needy students, with 
preference given to orphans. 

Grover and Addy Raby Loan Fund. Established in 1945 
by Dr. J. G. Raby of Tarboro, North Carolina, in 
memory of his parents. Preference is given to applicants 
from the First Baptist Church of Tarboro. 

98 



Ministerial Aid Fund 



James F. Slate Loan Fund. Established in 1908 by 
the late J. F. Slate of Stokes County, North Carolina, 
and is available for ministerial students who have been 
licensed to preach. 

Ministerial Aid Fund 

The Ministerial Aid Fund was established in 1897 
through a bequest from the estate of the late J. A. 
Melke and has been added to from time to time. 

Funds are available to ministerial students on either 
a loan or a grant basis. Written application must be 
made to the Committee on Scholarships and Student 
Aid on form obtainable from that committee. Awards 
are made on the basis of merit and need, and particularly 
in the case of grants, academic achievement. Five annual 
grants in the amount of $200 each are regularly avail- 
able, in addition to such others as the Committee 
may award. 



99 



ACTIVITIES 

Student Government 

The two chief agencies of student government are 
the Student Legislature and the Student Honor Council. 

The Student Legislature is composed of twenty-five 
representatives of the four classes, the vice-president of 
the student body serving as Speaker. It is the duty of 
the Student Legislature to perform all acts necessary 
in the exercise of its powers as the legislative branch of 
student government. The Legislature also sets up stu- 
dent committees to work parallel with faculty committees 
on matters concerning students. 

The Student Honor Council, which tries violators of 
the Honor System, is composed of sixteen members from 
the senior, junior, and sophomore classes. 

The Honor System 

The Honor System is an expression of the concern of 
Wake Forest College that its students shall be domi- 
nated by ideals of honor and integrity. The Honor 
System is an integral part of the Student Government of 
the College as adopted by the students and approved 
by the Administration. The essence of the Honor Sys- 
tem is that each student's word can be trusted implicitly 
and that any violation of a student's word is an offense 
against the whole student community. The Honor Sys- 
tem binds the student in such matters as the following: 
He must neither give nor receive aid upon any exami- 
nation, quiz or other pledge work; he must have com- 
plete respect for the property rights of others; he must 
not give false testimony or pass a worthless check know- 
ing it to be such; he must report to the Student Council 
any violation of the Honor System that comes under 
his observation. 

100 



Literary Societies 



A student accused of violating the Honor System will 
be given a hearing before the Student Council. If he is 
found guilty of cheating, he may be suspended from the 
College. Such student shall be re-admitted to the College 
only on the approval of the Faculty or its Executive 
Committee, and during the period of suspension his 
record shall not be subject to transfer to another college 
without a notation of his suspension. The penalty for 
stealing, giving false testimony, or knowingly passing a 
worthless check may also be suspension. The penalty for 
failing to report to the Student Council all violations of 
the Honor System which may come to a student's 
knowledge shall be in the discretion of the Student 
Council. 

Students in enforcing the Honor System are protect- 
ing the integrity of their student community and their 
own individual rights and reputation. They thereby 
enjoy the confidence of one another, the Faculty, the 
Administration and the public. 

Literary Societies 

There are two literary societies — the Philomathesian 
and the Euzelian. These literary societies are regarded 
as important aids in the work of education, especially 
in giving training in parliamentary procedure, in culti- 
vating and directing the taste for reading, and in the 
formation of correct habits of public speaking. 

Several medals are offered by the literary societies: 
in the Philomathesian Society — senior orator's medal, 
junior orator's medal, sophomore debater's medal, and 
freshman improvement medal; in the Euzelian Society 
— -Julius C. Smith senior orator's medal, junior orator's 
medal, sophomore debater's medal, freshman debater's 
medal, and freshman improvement medal. 

101 



Debate Tournaments 



Society Day, an annual celebration of the literary 
societies, occurs in the autumn of each year, with a de- 
bate, orations, and other features. 

Representatives of the literary societies participate 
in the Founder's Day programs on or near February 
3 every year. 

Senior Orations 

On the second Monday in April the faculty selects 
four members of the senior class as speakers for com- 
mencement day. The nominations are made by a com- 
mittee of the faculty from those who have spoken 
either before the committee or on some public occasion 
in college. The speakers selected are required to pre- 
sent their commencement addresses, limited to one 
thousand words, to the committee for approval before 
May 16. 

Forensic Activities 

Wake Forest has always stressed participation in 
debating and allied speech activities, and the College 
holds membership in a number of state and national 
speech organizations, including Pi Kappa Delta, na- 
tional honorary forensic fraternity. Representatives 
of the College engage in state, regional, and national 
tournaments, and take part in debates, oratorical con- 
tests, and many other forms of competitive speaking. 

All undergraduate students in good standing are 
eligible to participate in forensics and to represent the 
College in intercollegiate competition. 

Debate and Speech Tournaments 
A. North Carolina High School Speech Festival 

In the spring of each year, the College sponsors a 
speech festival, to which are invited the high schools 

102 



College Theater 



of North Carolina. Trophies, medals, and certificates 
are given to the winning schools, and awards are 
made to individuals in debate, oral interpretation, 
radio announcing, extemporaneous speaking, ora- 
tory, after-dinner speaking and drama. 

B. Novice Tournament 

In the fall of each year the College sponsors a 
debate tournament to which are invited novice de- 
baters from the colleges and universities of the 
Southeastern United States. Awards are given to the 
winning schools at the end of the tournament. The 
tournament is open to college students who have 
never previously participated in intercollegiate de- 
bating. 

C. Intercollegiate Tournament 

During the school year, the College sponsors a 
national debate tournament to which are invited 
colleges and universities which excel in debate. 
Trophies are given to the winning schools. 

Speech Institute 
High school students are invited to participate in the 
Summer Speech Institute, which is held for four weeks 
during the regular summer session, and which is open 
to students from all states. Specialized training in debate 
and public speaking is offered, and students are given 
an opportunity to debate the National Forensic League 
query in advance of the regular debate season . . 

College Theater 

The Wake Forest College Theater presents five major 
productions annually. One of these productions is 
presented during the Magnolia Festival. Any student 

103 



Medals 

enrolled in the College is eligible to try out for the casts 
or to become affiliated with the production staffs. 

College Radio Station 

The college radio station presents approximately 
thirty hours of programs every week during the school 
year. Programs include music, news, sports, lectures, 
discussions, interviews, and dramas. The station pro- 
vides an opportunity for students to learn all phases of 
radio production while actually participating as an- 
nouncers, interviewers, directors, newscasters, sports- 
casters, actors, and writers. 

Medals 

The A. D. Ward Medal is awarded annually to the 
senior making the best address on commencement day. 

The Lura Baker Paden Medal, established in 1922 by 
Dean S. Paden (B.A., 1918), is awarded annually to 
the senior who has obtained the highest average grade 
on the courses taken by him in the School of Business 
Administration. 

The J. B. Currin Medal is awarded annually for the 
best oration on the general topic of Christ in Modern 
Life. 

Medals offered by the Literary Societies are listed 
on page 101. 

The Carolina Award is presented to the major in 
Biology who writes the best paper on a subject selected 
by the National Biology Society. Given by the Carolina 
Biological Supply Company of Elon College, N. C. 

The Biology Research Award is presented to the major in 

104 



Medals 

Biology who does the best piece of original research 
during the year. Given by the Beta Rho Chapter of 
Beta Beta Beta of Wake Forest College. 

The Poteat Award is presented to the student in Biology 
1-2 who is adjudged the most outstanding, and plans 
to major in the department. Given by the Will Cor- 
poration of Georgia, and sponsored by Beta Beta Beta. 

The Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key is presented to the 
graduating senior in the School of Business Administra- 
tion who has earned the highest average during the 
seven semesters prior to the semester in which graduation 
occurs. 

The Alpha Kappa Psi Scholarship Key is awarded an- 
nually during the graduation exercises to the graduating 
senior in the School of Business Administration who has 
the highest average for the first three years. 

The A. M. Pullen and Company Medal is presented each 
year during commencement to the graduating ac- 
counting major who has reached the highest achieve- 
ment in accounting studies. 

The North Carolina Association of Certified Public Account- 
ants Medal is awarded each spring to the outstanding 
senior accounting major. 

The Wall Street Journal Medal and one year's sub- 
scription to the Journal are received each year by the 
graduating senior who has been most outstanding in 
finance courses. 

Delta Kappa Nu's Business Woman Student Award is 
presented annually during the graduation exercises to 
the most outstanding senior business woman who is 

105 



Honor Societies 



seeking a B.B.A. degree or a B.A. degree in Economics 
or Commercial Education. 

Medals and awards offered by the Department of 
Military Science and Tactics are listed on pages 166-68. 

Fraternities 

The following social fraternities have been established : 
Alpha Sigma Phi, Delta Sigma Phi, Kappa Alpha, 
Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, Pi Kappa Alpha, 
Sigma Chi, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Sigma Pi, Theta Chi. 

The Interfraternity Council, under the supervision 
of the Faculty Committee on Student Affairs, is the gov- 
erning body of the social fraternities. The Council en- 
deavors to maintain a high standard of conduct and 
scholarship. The Council offers a cup to the fraternity 
whose members make the highest class grades. By 
order of the faculty, students who are on probation for 
any reason may not be initiated into any fraternity 
until the end of their probationary period. 

The following professional fraternities have been 
established: Alpha Kappa Psi (business), Delta Sigma 
Pi (business), Phi Alpha Delta (law), Phi Delta Phi 
(law), Phi Epsilon Kappa (physical education). There 
is also a chapter of Alpha Phi Omega, national service 
fraternity. 

Honor Societies 

The following honor societies have been established: 
Alpha Epsilon Delta (pre-medicine), Beta Beta Beta 
(biology), Delta Kappa Alpha (ministry), Delta Phi 
Alpha (German), Eta Sigma Phi (classics), Gamma 
Sigma Epsilon (chemistry), Kappa Mu Epsilon (mathe- 
matics), Pershing Rifles (military), Phi Alpha Theta 



106 



Publications 



(history), Phi Sigma Iota (Romance languages), Pi 
Gamma Mu (social science), Pi Kappa Delta (forensic), 
Rho Tau Sigma (radio), Scabbard and Blade (military), 
Phi Beta Kappa, Omicron Delta Kappa, and Tassels. 
There is also a Wake Forest College Student Section of 
the American Institute of Physics. 

Phi Beta Kappa, an honor society founded at the 
College of William and Mary in 1776 and having 
chapters in many American colleges and universities, 
each year invites to membership a limited number of 
students who have displayed personal qualities of high 
character and who particularly have distinguished them- 
selves in fields of liberal scholarship. 

Omicron Delta Kappa, an intercollegiate honor 
society which has as its purpose the recognition and 
encouragement "of intelligent, democratic leadership 
among college men," elects semiannually on the basis 
of character and eminence in one or more of the following 
five phases of campus life: "scholarship; athletics; student 
government, social and religious activities; publications; 
and forensic, dramatic, musical and other cultural 
activities." 

Tassels is a local honor society for women, with 
standards and purposes similar to those of Omicron 
Delta Kappa. Its membership is made up of women 
students who have shown qualities of scholarship, 
character, and leadership in some phase of college life. 

Publications 

The Student, a literary magazine, Old Gold and Black, a 
weekly newspaper, and The Howler, the College annual, 
are published by the students. 



107 



Recreational Activities 



Religious Activities 

The religious activities of the campus are under 
the general direction of the College Chaplain. Affiliated 
with his office is the Baptist Student Union, which 
promotes Sunday school classes, training union groups, 
a ministerial conference, student forums, vesper serv- 
ices, socials, and other student activities. Other denomi- 
national groups associated with the Chaplain's office 
are the Canterbury Club, Westminster Fellowship, 
Wesleyan Foundation, and the Lutheran League. 

In conformity with a tradition dating back to the 
second year of the College's life, there is a Baptist 
Church on the campus which meets in regular services 
Sunday morning, Sunday evening, and at appointed 
times during the week. 

Chapel services are held at 10:00 on Tuesday and 
Thursday, attendance being required of all students. 

Recreational Activities 

Recognizing the importance of physical recreation in 
maintaining the well-being of students, the College 
provides extensive athletic and recreational facilities and 
a faculty of trained supervisors to direct activities in 
these fields. Each student is given the opportunity to 
develop his individual interest and skill in physical edu- 
cation and recreational classes. In addition to these 
classes, the Department of Physical Education under- 
takes a broad intramural sports program consisting of 
tournaments and organized club activities. 

In order to provide for a recreational program for 
all students, the College maintains athletic fields, tennis 
courts, and a combination athletic, physical education 
and recreation building which includes a swimming 

108 



Intercollegiate Athletics 



pool, handball and squash racquet courts, rhythm studio, 
arts and crafts room, recreational area, corrective rooms, 
a gymnastic and wrestling room, and four separate 
gymnasiums including a women's gym, a varsity basket- 
ball gym, and two men's intramural gyms. 

The Student Union 

The Student Union at Wake Forest College is a union 
of all the students. Its purpose is to coordinate, increase 
and develop social, recreational, and educational ac- 
tivities available to Wake Forest College students, both 
on and off campus. 

Part of the resolution voted on and approved by the 
student body of Wake Forest in the spring of 1957 is as 
follows: "... realizing that such a program would re- 
quire a student fee, we approve a student activity fee 
that will not exceed $1.50 per student each semester." 

The program of the Student Union can best be pre- 
sented by listing its seven committees: (1) Lecture Com- 
mittee, (2) Recreation Committee, (3) Small Socials 
Committee, (4) Major Functions Committee, (5) Pub- 
licity Committee, (6) Movies Committee, (7) Travel 
Committee. 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

The Director of Athletics has general supervision of 
intercollegiate athletic activities. 

The College is a member of the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association and the Atlantic Coast Conference. 
Rules and Regulations of the N.C.A.A. and of the 
Conference apply to all intercollegiate sports and eligi- 
bility of players. 

In order to become a member or a subordinate mem- 



109 



Automobiles 



ber of any athletic team, the student must conform 
to the following requirements: 

1. He must be a bona fide student. 

2. In order to represent the College in any inter- 
collegiate activity, the student must have completed 
without condition the minimum of twenty-four hours 
within the past year of residence work, including at 
least twelve hours with grades of "C" or better as 
recorded at the close of his last term. 

The eligibility of all candidates accompanying the 
team as representatives of the College in intercollegiate 
contests must be certified to the Director of Athletics 
by the Dean of the College. 

Any student may be declared ineligible at any time 
by the faculty or by its Executive Committee because 
of poor work or improper spirit. 

An athletic team may not be absent from the Col- 
lege for a total of more than ten weekdays during any 
term. Freshman teams are allowed only five absences 
in any one term. 

No student is allowed to represent the College on 
more than one intercollegiate team or club in any 
semester without special permission from the faculty 
or from its Executive Committee. 

Automobiles 

No woman student except a senior in good standing 
is allowed to have an automobile without receiving the 
permission of the Executive Committee of the faculty. 
Seniors who have cars must make arrangements for 
them with the Dean of Women. 

During his first semester in college a freshman male 
student living in a dormitory is not allowed to have an 

110 



Automobiles 



automobile. If he makes a G average during this first 
semester, he is allowed to have an automobile during 
the second semester. After his first two semesters, a 
student automatically loses the privilege of having 
an automobile at any time that he is placed on pro- 
bation. Exceptions to these regulations may be made 
only by written permission from the Dean's office. 



Ill 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

The degrees conferred are Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor 
of Science, Bachelor of Business Administration, Master 
of Arts, Bachelor of Laws; and Doctor of Medicine, 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in Bowman 
Gray School of Medicine. 

The general requirements for the Bachelor of Arts and 
the Bachelor of Science degrees are the same, with the 
following exceptions: (1) for the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts a student must complete a foreign language through 
courses numbered 21, 22, making a total of from 6 to 18 
hours of languages*; (2) for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science a student must either complete a foreign lan- 
guage through courses numbered 21, 22, or take eight 
hours in a second natural science or six additional 
hours in mathematics. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred only 
upon those students who (1) complete a major in Biology, 
Chemistry, Mathematics, Physical Education, Physics, 
or Education with State teachers' certification in Mathe- 
matics or Science; (2) complete the degree requirements 
in Medical Technology or Nursing; or (3) complete the 
requirements for the combined degree in Medical 
Sciences, Dentistry, Engineering, or Forestry. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred upon those 
students who (1) complete a major in other departments 
in the College of Liberal Arts; (2) complete a major in 
Economics or Commercial Education in the School of 
Business Administration; or (3) complete the require- 
ments for the combined degree in Law. 

Each student is responsible for acquainting himself 



• The candidate for the combined degree in Law may substitute for Language 21, 22, 
eight hours in a second natural science, six additional hours in mathematics, or six 
hours in the principles of economics. 

112 



Academic Requirements 



with the requirements for graduation, and for meeting 
the requirements as stated. 

A student who has been graduated from Wake Forest 
College with the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor 
of Science may not thereafter receive the other of these 
two degrees. 

Academic Requirements 

For the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of 
Science the student must complete (1) the basic course 
requirements, (2) a course of study approved by his 
major department, and (3) elective courses to make a 
total of 128 credit hours. A student applying for the 
combined degree must complete three-fourths of the 
128 hours, plus the major in the school in which he is 
enrolled during the senior year. 

The minimum requirement for a degree is the comple- 
tion of 64 hours in Wake Forest College, including the 
work of the senior year. Furthermore, the quality point 
requirement as explained in the next paragraph must 
be fully met. The prescribed courses are specified chiefly 
for the lower division, or the first two years; in the upper 
division the student devotes his time chiefly to advanced 
work in a major subject, related courses, and electives. 

At least 128 quality points must be presented for 
graduation, and the number of quality points must be 
at least equal to the number of semester hours attempted. 

A student who transfers from another institution must 
earn in Wake Forest College at least as many quality 
points as semester hours attempted in Wake Forest 
College, and must present as many total quality points 
as total hours attempted in all colleges. One who has 
previously attended two or more colleges must earn in 
Wake Forest College additional quality points equivalent 

113 



Basic Course Requirements 



to the number of hours of D grade earned in other col- 
leges attended. 

For each hour of credit earned in any course, the 
grade A gives three quality points; B, two quality points; 
C, one quality point. 

A student has the privilege of graduating under the 
provisions of the catalog under which he enters provided 
that he completes his course within six years; after the 
interval of six years he is expected to conform to the 
requirements specified for the class with which he is 
graduated. 

Basic Course Requirements 

All students in Wake Forest College are enrolled in 
the College of Liberal Arts during their freshman and 
sophomore years. A student is not admitted as a candi- 
date for a degree in any college or school except the 
College of Liberal Arts until the end of his sophomore 
year and the completion of the entrance requirements 
of the college or school to which application is made. 

All students enrolled in the College must take certain 
required basic courses. These requirements apply 
uniformly to all undergraduate degrees and all com- 
bined degrees, except as otherwise noted. 

These basic course requirements are as follows: 

English 1, 2, 3, 4 (12 hours) 
Language: 

to 12 hours, depending on the number of high school lan- 
guage units submitted by the student. 

French 1, 2, 3, 4 

German 1, 2, 3, 4 

Greek 1, 2 

Latin 1, 2, 3, 4 

Spanish 1, 2, 3, 4 

(In determining the level of language study which a beginning 
student should enter, one unit of high school language is 
considered the equivalent of a one semester course of college 

114 



Basic Course Requirements 



language. Thus, a student continuing in college a language 
begun in high school would normally enter: course 2, if he 
has had one high school unit; course 3, if he has had two high 
school units; course 4, if he has had three high school units; 
and course 21, if he has had four high school units. 

(A student who finds it necessary to repeat in college the equiva- 
lent of any modern foreign language taken in high school re- 
ceives no college credit for the course repeated. 

(An entering student who offers high school units in a classical 
language and who wishes to continue this language in college 
will be given a placement test, the results of which will be 
used by the department to determine his placement for credit 
in college. 

(Since an entering student is expected to present two high 
school units in foreign language, he is required to take one 
college year of foreign language without credit if he fails to 
present those high school units. 

(An entering student who offers two high school units in one 
foreign language may commence a second foreign language 
with credit. 

(An entering student who offers four high school units in one 
foreign language has completed the language requirement 
except for the B.A. degree. 

(A student applying for the degree of Bachelor of Business 
Administration may complete the language requirement be- 
yond 1, 2, by either Language 3, 4, or Speech 59 and Mathe- 
matics 24. 

(A student who plans graduate study or medical study should 
consult his adviser about additional foreign language study 
in his undergraduate program.) 
Religion (6 hours) selected from the following: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 

22, 25, 26, 31, 33, 35 
Philosophy 22 (3 hours) 
History 1 , 2 (6 hours) 
Social Science, one of the following three: 
* Business Administration 213, 214 (6 hours) 
** Political Science 11, 12 (6 hours) 

Sociology 1 1 (3 hours) and 3 hours selected from any other 
course numbered in the 20's and 30's, except course 34. 



• Except for students taking B.B.A. 

•• 3 hours from courses 13, 14, 25, 27, or 34 may be offered in lieu of course 12, on ap- 
proval of the Department of Political Science. 

115 



Basic Course Requirements 



Natural Science, one of the following three: 

Biology 1, 2 (8 hours) 

Chemistry 1, 2 (8 hours) 

Physics 1, 2 (8 hours) 
Mathematics 2 or 5 (3 hours) 

(A student who anticipates a degree or major requiring ad- 
ditional mathematics should continue mathematics through 
the freshman year.) 
Physical Education (2 hours) 
One of the following, as determined by the requirements for the 

specific degrees: 

Language 21, 22 (6 hours) 

A second natural science from among those listed above (8 hours) 

Additional mathematics (6 hours) 

Business Administration 213, 214 (6 hours) 

(The candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts must meet this 
requirement by Language 21, 22. The candidate for the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science may select the language or the 
science or the mathematics, as recommended by his major 
adviser. The candidate for the combined degree in Law may 
select any of the listed alternatives. The candidate for the 
degree of Bachelor of Business Administration must meet the 
requirement by Business Administration 213, 214.) 

The basic course requirements are to be completed, 
where possible, by the end of the sophomore year. Some 
students will find it necessary to postpone some of the 
basic courses until the junior year in order to make 
room for certain courses necessary to the work in the 
major field; but a minimum of twelve hours from among 
the basic courses must appear on every student's pro- 
gram each semester until these courses are completed, 
except that after the freshman year a minimum of nine 
hours each semester may be considered sufficient if 
other courses necessary to work in the major field must 
be taken. 

No student, except by a specific vote of the College 
faculty in regular session, may set aside, or substitute 
another course or other courses for, any of the basic 
course requirements. 

116 



Upper Division 



For further details about course requirements for the 
degree of Bachelor of Business Administration, consult 
the section of the catalog dealing with the School of 
Business Administration. 

Admission to the Upper Division 

The work in the lower division, as specified in the 
preceding pages of this section, is intended to give the 
student an introduction to the various fields of knowledge 
and to lay the foundation for concentration in a major 
subject and related fields during the junior and senior 
years. 

Before applying for admission to the upper division 
and beginning work on his major subject, a student 
should have 64 credit hours and 64 quality points in the 
lower division. In no case will a student be admitted to 
the upper division with fewer than 54 hours of credit 
and 54 quality points. 

All students at the end of the sophomore year or at 
the beginning of the junior year are required to pass a 
proficiency test in the use of the English language. 

Course of Study for the Upper Division 

Thirty days before the end of his sophomore year 
each student is required to indicate to the Registrar and 
to the department or school concerned his selection of a 
major subject in which he wishes to concentrate during 
his junior and senior years. Before this selection is 
formally approved by the Registrar, however, the 
student must present to him a written statement from 
the authorized representative of the department or 
school in which he wishes to major that he has received 
the permission of that department or school. The student 

117 



Majors 

will also at this time be assigned a specific adviser from 
the department or school to assist him in planning his 
work for the junior and senior years. 

A department which rejects a student as a major will 
file with the Dean of the College a written statement 
including the reason (s) for the rejection. 

After the beginning of the junior year a student may 
not change from one major to another without the ap- 
proval of the departments concerned. 

The student's course of study for the junior and senior 
years includes the minimum requirements for the de- 
partmental major (see the table below), together with 
such other courses as he shall select and his adviser shall 
approve — the latter courses to be sufficiently related to 
the student's major to justify their inclusion in his pro- 
gram. This course of study must include a minimum of 
42 hours in the student's field of concentration (that is, 
his major and related courses) beyond the basic course 
requirements as outlined on pages 114-16. 

Students preparing for the ministry are advised to 
elect twelve additional hours in religion beyond the 
six hours included in the basic course requirements. 

The following list indicates the number of hours re- 
quired in the departmental majors: 

Department Major 

Biology 32 

Chemistry 39 

Economics 30 

Education 18 

English 30 

French 30 

German 30 

Greek 30 

History 30 

Latin 30 

Mathematics 33 



118 



Law 



Music 36 

Philosophy 24 

Physical Education 35 

Physics 33 

Political Science 30 

Psychology 30 

Religion 30 

Religious Education 30 

Sociology 30 

Spanish 30 

Speech 30 

At least half of the major must be completed in Wake 
Forest College. 

Beyond the basic course requirements and the ap- 
proved course of study in his field of concentration, the 
student will elect other courses up to a minimum of 128 
hours. 

Not more than 40 hours of the 1 28 hours required for 
graduation may be taken in a single field of study. For 
the purposes of this regulation, the following fields of 
study are recognized: Biology, Chemistry, Economics, 
Education, English, French, German, Greek, History, 
Latin, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physical Edu- 
cation, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Religion, 
Sociology, Spanish, Speech. 

Bachelor of Business Administration 

For the requirements for this degree and the suggested 
course sequences, see page 219. 

Degrees in the School of Law 

A combined course makes it possible for a student in 
Wake Forest College to receive the two degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws in six academic 
years or their equivalent instead of seven years which 
are required if the two curricula are pursued independ- 

119 



Law 



ently. The first three years of the combined course are 
in the College of Liberal Arts and the last three are in 
the School of Law. 

Under this plan the student must first complete three 
years (96 semester hours) of academic work as follows: 

English 1, 2, 3, 4 (12 hours) 

Language 1, 2, 3, 4 (0-12 hours) [see page 114] 

Religion (6 hours) [see page 1 1 5] 

History 1, 2 (6 hours) 

Mathematics 2 or 5 (3 hours) 

Science, one of the following: 

Biology 1, 2 (8 hours) 

Chemistry 1, 2 (8 hours) 

Physics 1, 2 (8 hours) 
Philosophy 22 (3 hours) 
Business Administration 213, 214 or Political Science or Sociology 

(6 hours) [see page 1 1 5] 
Physical Education (2 hours) 
One of the following: 

Language 21, 22 (6 hours) 

A second natural science (8 hours) 

Business Administration 213, 214 (6 hours) 

Additional mathematics (6 hours) 
Electives (to make a total of 96 hours) 

The requirement of a major subject for the academic 
degree is considered as satisfied by one year (29 semester 
hours) of Law. The details of the plan are as follows: 

On the completion of 96 semester hours of academic 
work in the College of Liberal Arts, as above specified, 
with a minimum average grade of C (or one quality 
point for each semester hour undertaken), the student 
may be admitted to the School of Law. (Non-theory 
courses in military science, hygiene, domestic arts, physi- 
cal education, vocal or instrumental music, practice 
teaching, teaching methods and techniques and similar 
courses are not acceptable under the above rule. "Re- 
quired" non-theory work is acceptable up to ten per 

120 



Medical Sciences 



cent of the total credit offered for admission.) Upon 
satisfactory completion of the first full year (29 semester 
hours) of Law, with a cumulative weighted average 
sufficient for him to remain in the School of Law, the 
student will be awarded the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

The Bachelor of Laws degree will be awarded the 
student upon the completion of two additional years in 
the School of Law and upon fulfillment of the require- 
ments for that degree as described on page 241. 

At least one year of the required academic work must 
be taken at Wake Forest College. A student who transfers 
from another institution at the end of his first or second 
year must maintain a minimum average grade of C on 
all academic work undertaken during his residence at 
Wake Forest College. In addition, students pursuing 
the combined course plan must take the Law School 
Admission Test and satisfy all requirements specified 
for other applicants for admission to the Law School. 

Degrees in Medical Sciences 

A limited number of students, by taking advantage 
of the special arrangement explained here, may receive 
the B.S. degree with a major in Medical Sciences. 

Under this plan the student fulfills the requirements 
for the degree by completing three years of work in the 
College of Liberal Arts with a minimum average grade 
of C, and by satisfactorily completing the first full year 
of Medicine (at least 30 semester hours) as outlined by 
the faculty of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine, 
with a record entitiing him to promotion to the Second 
Year Class. At least one year (32 semester hours) of 
the required academic work must be completed in 
Wake Forest College. 

Candidates for the B.S. degree with a major in Medi- 

121 



Medical Technology 



cal Sciences must complete the following courses in the 

College of Liberal Arts before entering the School of 

Medicine for their fourth year of work:* 

Biology 1, 2 (8 hours) 

Biology 21 (4 hours) 

Biology 25 (4 hours) 

Chemistry 1, 12 (8 hours) 

Chemistry 20 (4 hours) 

Chemistry 21 (4 hours) 

English 1, 2, 3, 4 (12 hours) 

Language, one of the following: French, German, Latin, Spanish, 

through 3-4; or Greek 1-2. See page 114. 
Mathematics 5-6 (6 hours) 
Physics 1, 2 (8 hours) 
Philosophy 22 (3 hours) 
Religion (6 hours) selected from the following: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 22, 

25, 26, 31, 33, 35 
History 1, 2 (6 hours) 
Business Administration 213, 214 or Political Science or Sociology 

(6 hours). See page 115. 
Physical Education (2 hours) 
Electives (to make a total of 96 hours) 

The completion of the prescribed academic subjects 
does not necessarily admit any student to the School 
of Medicine. About fifty are chosen from a large num- 
ber of applicants. All other factors being equal, ap- 
plicants who have done all their college work in Wake 
Forest College are given preference. 

Degree in Medical Technology 
Students may qualify for the Bachelor of Science de- 
gree in Medical Technology by completion of the aca- 
demic requirements outlined below with a minimum 
average grade of C, and by satisfactory completion of 
the full course in Medical Technology in the Bowman 
Gray School of Medicine with a minimum weighted 
average of 80. At least one year (32 semester hours) of 

* See pp. 245-46 and the special bulletin of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine 
for further information. 

122 



Nursing 

the required academic work must be completed in Wake 
Forest College. Candidates for the degree must com- 
plete the following three-year course before beginning 
study in the School of Medicine:* 

Biology 1, 2 (8 hours) 

Biology 22 (4 hours) 

Biology 31 (4 hours) 

Biology 33 (2 hours) 

Biology 35 (4 hours) 

Chemistry 1, 12 (8 hours) 

Chemistry 20 (4 hours) 

Chemistry 21 or 24 (4 hours) 

English 1, 2, 3, 4 (12 hours) 

Language, one of the following: French, German, Latin, Spanish 

through 3-4; or Greek 1-2. See page 114. 
Mathematics 5-6 (6 hours) 
Physics 1, 2 (8 hours) 
Philosophy 22 (3 hours) 
Religion (6 hours) selected from the following: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 

22, 25, 26, 31, 33, 35 
History 1, 2 (6 hours) 
Business Administration 213, 214 or Political Science or Sociology 

(6 hours). See page 115. 
Physical Education (2 hours) 
Electives (to make a total of 96 hours) 



Degree in Nursing 
Students may qualify for the Bachelor of Science 
degree in Nursing by meeting the academic require- 
ments outlined below and completing the work lead- 
ing to a Diploma in Nursing from an approved hospital 
or school of nursing. The usual qualitative require- 
ments must be met for this degree. At least two years 
(64 semester hours) of the required academic work 
must be completed in Wake Forest College. If the can- 
didate is to attend North Carolina Baptist Hospital, 
the required residence in the College may be reduced 

• For admission information, see the special bulletin of Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine. 

123 



Dentistry 

to one year. Candidates for the degree must complete 
the following three-year course before entering the 
School of Nursing: 

Biology 1 , 2 (8 hours) 

Biology 25 (4 hours) 

Biology 33 (2 hours) 

Chemistry 1, 12 (8 hours) 

Chemistry 21 or 24 (4 hours) 

English 1, 2, 3, 4 (12 hours) 

Language, one of the following: French, German, Latin, Spanish 

through 3-4; or Greek 1-2. See page 1 14. 
Mathematics 2 or 5 (3 hours) 
Philosophy 22 (3 hours) 
Religion (6 hours) selected from the following: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 

22, 25, 26, 31, 33, 35 
History 1, 2 (6 hours) 
Business Administration 213, 214 or Political Science or Sociology 

(6 hours). See page 115. 
Physical Education (2 hours) 
Electives (to make a total of 96 hours) 
(Suggested electives: English, Psychology, Social Sciences) 



Degree With Major in Dentistry 
A student may fulfill the requirements for a B.S. 
degree with a major in Dentistry by completing three 
years of work in the College of Liberal Arts with a 
minimum average grade of C, and by satisfactorily 
completing the first two years of work in one of certain 
approved dental schools designated by Wake Forest 
College, with a record entitling him to advancement to 
the Third Year Class. 

For this degree the requirements in the College of 
Liberal Arts are the same as outlined above for the B.S. 
degree with a major in Medical Sciences. 



124 



Engineering 

Degrees in Engineering 
The 3-2 Engineering Program 

Wake Forest College now cooperates with Duke 
University and North Carolina State College in offering 
a broad course of study in the arts and sciences com- 
bined with specialized training in engineering. 

This program, for outstanding students, covers five 
years of study including three initial years on the 
campus of Wake Forest College and two full years of 
technical training at one of the schools of engineering. 
Depending upon the school and field of engineering 
chosen, it may be necessary for a student to take an 
additional summer's work in engineering. 

Upon successful completion of the five years of study 
the student will receive the degree of Bachelor of Science 
from Wake Forest College and the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in one of the specialized engineering fields 
from the engineering school of his choice. 

By obtaining the first degree from Wake Forest 
College and the second from an engineering college, 
the graduate will be well suited for positions of higher 
responsibility where public relations and technical 
knowledge are combined. This combination plan is 
recognized by nationally known educators as a wise 
program in allowing the student a broad background 
in the liberal arts in addition to the specialized and 
technical training involved in the engineering degree. 

The curriculum for the first three years must include 
all the basic course requirements for the Bachelor of 
Science degree, as outlined on pages 114-16 of this 
catalog. A suggested program follows: 



125 



Engineering 

Freshman Year Hours 

English 1-2 3 3 

Chemistry 1-12 4 4 

Mathematics 5-6 3 3 

Foreign Language 3-4 3 3 

Religion 3 3 

Physical Education 1-2 1 1 

17 17 
ROTC if elected 1 1 

18 18 

Sophomore Year Hours 

English 3-4 3 3 

History 1-2 3 3 

Physics 1-2 4 4 

Mathematics 1 1 or Elective 3 

Humanities Elective 3 

Mathematics 12-13 3 3 

16 16 

ROTC if elected 2 2 

18 18 
Junior Year 

Mathematics 16, 54 2 2 

Physics 11, 26 3 3 

Mathematics 31-38 3 3 

Philosophy 22 3 

Humanities Elective 3 

Science Elective 4 4 

Business Administration 3, 4 or Political Science 

11-12, or Sociology 3 3 

18 18 



This is a rigorous curriculum and demands students 
with an aptitude for science and mathematics. The 
electives will be chosen in consultation with the engi- 
neering adviser in the Department of Physics. 

126 



Forestry 

See page 164 for procedure involved in transferring 
ROTC credits to Duke University or N. C. State 
College. 

Degrees in Forestry 

Wake Forest College now cooperates with Duke Uni- 
versity in an academic forestry training program. A 
student in this program devotes three years to study in 
the arts and sciences at Wake Forest College. (At least 
two years (64 semester hours) must be completed in 
Wake Forest College.) He spends the summer between 
his junior and senior years and the two following years 
in the Duke University School of Forestry. Upon the 
successful completion of this five-year course of study 
he receives the degree of Bachelor of Science from Wake 
Forest College and the degree of Master of Forestry 
from the Duke School of Forestry. 

A student who wishes to qualify for this program 
must make formal application for admission to the Duke 
School of Forestry not later than the end of the first 
semester of his third year in college. To qualify for ad- 
mission he must have followed a planned course of 
study as outlined below, must have the official recom- 
mendation of Wake Forest College, and must have an 
over-all quality point ratio of at least 1.5. 

Candidates for the degrees in forestry must complete 
the following three-year course before beginning study 
in the Duke School of Forestry: 

Biology 1, 2 (8 hours) 
Biology 23, 24 (8 hours) 
Business Administration 3, 4 (6 hours) 
Chemistry 1, 12 (8 hours) 
English 1, 2, 3, 4 (12 hours) 

Language, one of the following: French, German, Latin, Spanish, 
through 3-4; or Greek 1-2. See page 114. 

127 



Forestry 

Mathematics 5 (3 hours) and three additional hours as recom- 
mended by the Department of Mathematics 

Physics 1, 2 (8 hours) 

Philosophy 22 ( 3 hours) 

Religion (6 hours) selected from the following: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 22, 
25, 26, 31, 33, 35 

History 1, 2, (6 hours) 

Physical Education (2 hours) 

Electives (to make a total of 96 hours) 

(Suggested electives: Biology, Chemistry, Logic, Mathematics, 
Speech) 

Students in this program will be advised in the De- 
partment of Biology. 

See page 164 for procedure involved in transferring 
ROTC credits to Duke University. 



128 



COURSES IN LIBERAL ARTS 

Divisions 

The courses announced in the following pages fall 
into two main divisions: lower division courses, num- 
bered from 1 to 19, primarily for freshmen and sopho- 
mores; upper division courses, numbered 20 and above, 
primarily for juniors and seniors. 

Before admission to the upper division, a student 
must have credit for at least 54 hours in the lower di- 
vision, with a minimum of 54 quality points. 

Credit Hours Defined 

All credit hours are based upon the semester, or half 
of an academic year of nine months. In the depart- 
ments which follow, in alphabetical order, the credit 
hours for each course are the same as the number of 
class periods per week unless otherwise specified. 

Both in the summer term and in the fall and spring 
terms, the credit for any course is the same, generally 
three hours based on 48 class periods, or the equivalent 
in laboratory work. 

Explanation of the Schedule 

In this number of the Bulletin of Wake Forest 
College the schedule of classes is announced for the 
fall and spring terms only; the schedule of classes for the 
summer term is given in the special bulletin. The num- 
bers following the days of the week indicate the periods 
during which the classes are offered. 

Courses with odd numbers are regularly given in 
the fall term; courses with even numbers, in the spring 
term. However, introductory or basic courses in many 
departments will be offered every term so that students 

129 



Biology 

may arrange their work in regular sequence, accord- 
ing to the time of entrance. Accordingly, revised sched- 
ules will be prepared each term, supplementing the 
schedule given here. 

Biology 
Professors Cocke, Bradbury 
Associate Professors Allen, Britt 
Assistant Professors Davis, Johnston, McDon- 
ald, Wyatt 
A major in biology consists of 32 credit hours which 
must include Biology 1 and 2, 8 hours of botany to be 
selected from Biology 23, 24, 27, 28, 31, 8 hours of 
zoology and Biology 40. 

Required related courses for the major are: one year 
of physics, one year of general chemistry and one course 
in organic chemistry. The physics requirement may be 
waived in the case of biology majors who meet the re- 
quirements for a Grade A teaching certificate. 

1,2. General Biology 

An introductory course, in which the fundamental facts of the 
structure and activity of plants and animals are stressed. The labora- 
tory work will provide examples of important biological principles 
and organisms. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory. Biology 1, 
prerequisite to Biology 2. 

Credit, 4 hours per semester, both semesters 

3. Anatomy and Physiology 

Lectures and reading in human anatomy and physiology. Not open 
to students who have completed a course in comparative anatomy. 
Three hours lecture. 

M W F 1 Credit, 3 hours. Fall semester 

4. Hygiene 

Lectures and reading in hygiene, personal and community, together 
with a study of infectious diseases. Two hours lecture. 

T T 6 Credit, 2 hours. Spring semester 

130 



Biology 

20. Vertebrate Natural History 

A detailed study of the natural history, distribution, identification, 
classification, and adaptions of the major vertebrate animals. Collect- 
ing and preserving techniques in the field will be stressed. Prereq- 
uisites, Biology 1, 2. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory. 

M W 6, M W 7-8 Credit, 4 hours. Fall semester 

21. Comparative Anatomy 

A comparative study of the anatomy of chordate animals. Dissection 
of type forms in the laboratory. Prerequiste, Biology 1, 2. Two hours 
lecture, four hours laboratory. 

M W 1, T T 1-2; M W 1, T T 7-8 Credit, 4 hours. Fall semester 

22. Animal Parasitology 

A study of animal parasites and diseases caused by them. In the 
laboratory a study in detail of types of parasites. Prerequisite, Biology 
1, 2. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory. 

M W 2, T T 1-2 Credit, 4 hours. Spring semester 

23. Survey of the non-vascular plants 

Representative species of non-vascular plants (algae, fungi, mosses 
and others) will be examined with emphasis on morphology and phy- 
logeny. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory. Prerequisite 
Biology 1, 2. 

M W 2, T T 1-2 Credit, 4 hours. Fall semester 

24. Survey of the vascular plants 

A comparative survey of the vascular plants with emphasis on the 
structure, reproduction, and classification of selected types to portray 
the evolutionary development of the group. Two hours lecture, four 
hours laboratory. Prerequisites, Biology 1. 2. 

T T 4, M W 3-4 Credit, 4 hours. Fall semester 

25. Embryology 

A study of vertebrate embryological development. Prerequisite, 
Biology 1,2. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory. 

TT4,MW 3-4; T T 4, M W 6-7 Credit, 4 hours. Spring semester 

26. Histology 

A study of the microscopic anatomy of animals, particularly a mam- 

131 



Biology 

malian form. Prerequisite, Biology 1, 2. Two hours lecture, four hours 
laboratory. 

M W 6, M W 7-8 Credit, 4 hours. Spring semester 

27. Taxonomy of the seed plants 

A study of the classification of seed plants with emphasis on a com- 
parative study of orders and families. Collection, identification and 
preparation of herbarium specimens will be stressed. Prerequisite, 
Biology 1 , 2. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory. 

T T 6, T T 7-8 Credit, 4 hours. Spring semester 

28. Plant physiology 

Fundamental physical and chemical phenomena associated with 
higher plants will be explored in detail. Prerequisite, Biology 1, 2., 
and general chemistry. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory. 
M W 2, T T 1-2 Credit, 4 hours. Spring semester 

3 1 . Bacteriology 

Culture methods, water analysis, milk analysis, general identification 
and classification of non-pathogenic forms of bacteria will be em- 
phasized. Prerequisite, Biology 1, 2. Two hours lecture, four hours 
laboratory. 

T T 4, M W 3-4; T T 4, M W 6-7 Credit, 4 hours. Spring semester 

33. Histological Technique 

A course in the preparation of slides of animal and plant tissues 
designated to introduce the students to histological and cytological 
methods. Prerequisite, Biology 1. 2. Four hours laboratory. 

T T 7-8 Credit, 2 hours. Fall semester 

35. Genetics 

A study of the principles of inheritance and their applications as 

related to various animals and plants including the human being. 

Prerequisite, Biology 1, 2. Three hours lecture, two hour laboratory. 

M W F 6, F 7-8 Credit, 4 hours. Fall semester 

36. General Physiology 

Fundamental physiological processes in living systems. Comparative 
study of physiological systems in different organisms approached 
through a study of cells and tissues. Prerequisite, two years of biology, 
one year of chemistry. Organic chemistry recommended. Two hours 
lecture, four hours laboratory. 

T T 4, M W 3-4 Credit, 4 hours. Fall semester 

132 



Biology 



37. Invertebrate ^oology 

A detailed study of invertebrate animals, exclusive of insects, from 
the standpoint of their morphology, physiology and phylogenetic 
relationships. Some taxonomy may be included. Prerequisite, Bi- 
ology 1,2. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory. 

M W 1, T T 1-2 Credit, 4 hours. Spring semester 

38. Entomology 

A study of insects as to their structure, development and relationship, 
including a study of injurious insects, their destructiveness and the 
control of them. Prerequisite, Biology 1, 2. Two hours lecture, four 
hours laboratory. 

M W 6, M W 7-8 Credit, 4 hours. Spring semester 

39. History of Biological Sciences 

A survey of the historical background and development of the biologi- 
cal sciences together with a biographical study of the outstanding bi- 
ologists and medical doctors. Prerequisite, Biology 1, 2. Three hours 
lecture. 

M W F 3 Credit, 3 hours. Spring semester 

40. Historical Geology 

A brief survey of structural geology as a preparation for a study of 
fossilized plants and animals. The study of fossils, their nature, re- 
lationships and the causes of extinction of certain plants and animals, 
together with a consideration of theories will be stressed. Prerequisite, 
Biology 1, 2. Required of all Biology Majors. Three hours lecture. 
M W F 2 Credit, 3 hours. Fall semester 

43. Education 43. Teaching of Science 

T T S 5 Credit, 3 hours. Fall semester 

62. Seminar 

A course designed to acquaint the student with current scientific 
literature. The gathering of material and the preparation of scientific 
manuscripts will be stressed. Prerequisite, twelve hours of biology. 
Two hours conference per week. 

F 7-8 Credit, 1 hour. Spring semester 



133 



Chemistry 

Chemistry 

Professors Black, Nowell 

Associate Professors Blalock, Gross, Isbell, 

Miller 
Assistant Professor P. J. Hamrick 

In addition to the basic courses prescribed by the 
College, a student desiring to receive the B.S. degree 
with major in Chemistry is required to take the following 
courses: Chemistry 1-12, 20-35, 21-22, 37, 41-42, and 
one course from Chemistry 33, 34, 38; Physics 1, 2; 
Mathematics 12, 13. An average of C in the first two 
years of Chemistry is required of students who elect 
to major in this department. Admission to any class is 
conditioned by satisfactory grades in prerequisite 
courses, and registration for advanced classes must be 
approved by the department. 

Wake Forest College is on the list of schools approved 
by the American Chemical Society. Students who re- 
ceive the Bachelor's Degree and are certified by the 
chairman of the department as having fulfilled the 
minimum requirements for professional training as 
adopted by the Society are eligible for membership, 
senior grade, in the Society within two years following 
graduation and after two years experience in the field 
of chemistry. Students who desire a specific statement 
of the minimum requirements of the Society should 
consult with the staff member who serves as major ad- 
viser for students majoring in chemistry. 

The following schedule is recommended for students 
who desire to major in chemistry: (By following this 
schedule and the advice of the major adviser a student 
can meet the minimum requirements of the American 
Chemical Society.) 

184 



Chemistry 



Freshman Year* 

Chemistry 1-12 
English 1-2 
German 1-2 
History 1-2 
Mathematics 5, 1 1 

Physical Education 1-2 



Sophomore Year* 

Chemistry 20-35 
English 3-4 
German 3-4 
Mathematics 12, 13 
Physics 1-2 



Junior Year* 

Chemistry 21-22 
Chemistry 37 
Philosophy, 3 hours 
Business Administration 3-4 or 
Political Science or Sociology, 

6 hours 
Religion, 6 hours 
Mathematics 30 
**Electives, 6 hours 



Senior Year* 

Chemistry 41-42 
Chemistry, 4 hours 
**Electives, 20 hours 



1. General Chemistry 

An introductory course emphasizing fundamental chemical prin- 
ciples. Three hours lecture, four hours laboratory. Credit, 4 hours 

2. General Chemistry 

A continuation of Chemistry 1 with emphasis on the descriptive 
chemistry of inorganic substances. Prerequisite: Chemistry I. Three 
hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Credit, 4 hours 

12. General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis 

A continuation of Chemistry 1 with emphasis on the study of equilib- 
rium and inorganic chemistry. Approximately two-thirds of the 
laboratory work is devoted to the principles and techniques of syste- 
matic separation and identification of the inorganic cations and 
anions. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1, Three hours lecture, four hours 
laboratory. Credit, 4 hours 

19. Qualitative Analysis 

A course covering the principles and techniques of separation and 

systematic identification of the inorganic cations and anions. Open 



* Military Science may be taken in addition to the courses listed. 
** Chosen on the advice of the major adviser. 



135 



Chemistry 

only to students presenting a year of general chemistry without 
qualitative analysis. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1-2. Two hours lecture, 
three hours laboratory. Credit, 3 hours 

20. Volumetric Analysis 

A course in the principles and methods of volumetric quantitative 
analysis. Prerequisite: Chemistry 12 or 19; Mathematics 5,11. Two 
hours lecture, four hours laboratory. Credit, 4 hours 

21, 22. Organic Chemistry 

A study of the chemistry of the aliphatic and aromatic organic com- 
pounds. Prerequisite: Chemistry 20. Three hours lecture, four hours 
laboratory. Credit, 4 hours each semester 

24. Organic Chemistry 

A study of the chemistry of the aliphatic and aromatic compounds 
for students whose program demands only one semester of organic 
chemistry. Chemistry 21 may be substituted for Chemistry 24 but 
Chemistry 24 may not be substituted for Chemistry 2 1 . Credit will 
not be allowed for both Chemistry 21 and 24. Prerequisites: Chem- 
istry 1-12 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours laboratory per week. 

Credit, 4 hours 

26. Physical Chemistry for Pre-medical Students 
A course dealing with the physical behavior of gases, liquids, and 
solutions and including special discussion of the colligative properties 
of solutions, of the measurement of pH, and of the behavior of 
buffered solutions. Prerequisites: Chemistry 20 and Physics 3. 
Two hours lecture. Credit, 2 hours 

33. Organic Analysis 

A lecture and laboratory course in the systematic identification of 
organic compounds. Prerequisite: Chemistry 22. Two hours lecture, 
four hours laboratory. Credit, 4 hours 

34. Organic Preparations 

A library, conference, and laboratory course in the preparation of 
organic compounds. Prerequisite: Chemistry 22. Six hours a week. 

Credit, 3 hours 

35. Gravimetric Analysis 

A course in the principles and methods of gravimetric quantitative 
analysis. Prerequisite: Chemistry 20. Two hours lecture, six hours 
laboratory. Credit, 4 hours 

136 



Classical Languages 



37. Inorganic Chemistry 

A lecture and laboratory course devoted to the principles and theory 
of modern inorganic chemistry. Prerequisites: Chemistry 35 and 
Physics 1 . Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Credit, 4 hours 

38. Instrumental Analysis 

A course in the application of physical methods to analytical chem- 
istry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 41. Two hours lecture, four hours 
laboratory. Credit, 4 hours 

41, 42. Physical Chemistry 

A course in the fundamentals of physical chemistry. Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 22, Physics 1-2, and satisfactory work in differential and 
integral calculus. Three hours lecture, four hours laboratory. 

Credit, 4 hours each semester 
45. Atomic and Molecular Structure 

Atomic structure and the formation of chemical compounds. The 
relation of spectra, dipole moments, thermodynamics, and other 
physical concepts to molecular structure. Corequisite: Chemistry 41. 

Credit, 3 hours 

48. Physical Organic Chemistry 

Chemical kinetics and thermodynamics as applied to organic re- 
action mechanisms and the correlation of molecular structure with 
chemical reactivity. Corequisite: Chemistry 41. Credit, 3 hours 

51, 52. Senior Research 

Library, conference, and laboratory work. Open only to major 
students with a superior record. Six hours a week. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester 



Classical Languages and Literature 

Professor Earp 

Associate Professor C. V. Harris 

A major in this department consists of a minimum of 
30 hours in either Greek or Latin. 



137 



Greek 

I 

Greek Language and Literature 

1,2. Elementary Greek 

Greek grammar; selections from Greek prose writers and poets; 
collateral reading on Greek mythology, history, and antiquities. 
M T W Th F 2 

21. Xenophon 

Xenophon: Anabasis, fall term. Thorough drill in syntax. 
M WF3 

22. Homer 

Homer: Iliad and Odyssey, spring term. Thorough drill in syntax. 
M WF7 

23. Plato 

Plato: Meno or Apology, Crito, and selections from the Phaedo, spring 
term. 

M W F 3 

24. The Greek New Testament 

Selections from the Greek New Testament, fall term. 
M W F7 

25. Greek Tragedy 

Euripides: Medea. This course will include a study of the origin and 
history of Greek tragedy, with collateral reading of selected tragedies 
in translation. 
TT4 

26. Greek Comedy 

Aristophanes: Clouds. This course will include a study of the origin 
and history of Greek comedy, with collateral reading of selected 
comedies in translation. 
TTh4 



138 



Latin 

31. Greek Civilization 

Lectures and collateral reading upon those phases of Greek civiliza- 
tion which have particular significance for the modern world. Given 
the first semester. This course is recommended especially to juniors 
and seniors. A knowledge of the Greek language is not required. 
TTh7 

32. Greek Literature in Translation 

A study of selections from Greek literature in English translation. 
Given the second semester. This course is recommended especially 
to juniors and seniors. A knowledge of the Greek language is not 
required. 
TTh7 

II 

Latin Language and Literature 

1, 2. Introductory Latin 

A course intended for students who have never studied Latin and for 
those who present only one unit of Latin for entrance. 
M WF2 

3, 4. Grammar, Cicero, Vergil 

This course will include (a) grammar, (b) Cicero's Letters, Vergil's 
Aeneid. Prerequisite, two units of entrance Latin or Latin 1, 2. 
M WF3 

21, 22. Livy, Horace, Pliny 

Livy: Selections, first semester. Horace: Odes and Epodes, Pliny's 
Letters, second semester. Prerequisite, four units of entrance Latin 
or Latin 1 , 2 and 3, 4. 
M WF7 

23, 24. Tacitus, Horace, Martial 

Tacitus: Germania and Agricola, first semester. Horace: Satires and 
Epistles; Martial: Epigrams, second semester. 
MWF4 



139 



Education 

25, 26. Roman Comedy and Satire 

Selected plays of Plautus and Terence, first semester. Petronius and 
Juvenal, second semester. 

M WF4 

28. Latin Prose Composition 

Hours to be arranged Credit, 2 hours 

29, 30. Roman Philosophy 
Lucretius, Cicero. 

TTS2 

31. Roman Civilization 

This course consists of lectures and collateral reading upon the 
general subject of Rome's contributions to the modern world. It 
is recommended especially to juniors and seniors. A knowledge of 
the Latin language is not required. 
TTh4 

32. Latin Literature and Translation 

A study of selections from Latin literature in English translation. 
This course is recommended especially to juniors and seniors. A 
knowledge of the Latin language is not required. 
TTh4 

Education 

Professor Memory 

Associate Professor Preseren 

Instructor Propst 

Admission Requirements. Junior standing is a general 
requisite for all courses in Education. Psychology is 
recommended as a preliminary course, and a course in 
Public Speaking is highly desirable. Before a student 
teaching assignment is granted, the applicant will 
be examined in order to determine whether the student 
has any noticeable speech problems. 

140 



Education 

Major in the Department of Education. Students who 
major in Education must meet Class A certification 
requirements in at least one broad field of more than 
12 hours, as outlined below. Such certification requires, 
among other subjects, a course in Directed Teaching; 
and before a Directed Teaching opportunity is granted, 
the student must have a quality point ratio as high as 
1.0 on his over-all record or in subject of certification. 
Those accepted must be emotionally stable, with no 
serious speech impediment, and must possess qualities 
of character which are generally regarded as desirable 
for leaders of youth. 

State Certificates. Any course offered here will be ac- 
credited by the State Board of Education as satisfying, 
in part, the requirements for a State teacher's cer- 
tificate. Only the courses listed in this department will 
count as professional credit. 

The State Department of Public Instruction awards 
the High School Certificate, Class A, to graduates of the 
college who have had the specified courses in their 
respective teaching fields and the professional courses 
prescribed as outlined below. 

Certification requirements must be met in at least one 
teaching field; however, a two-subject certificate is far 
more desirable because most teachers in the State have 
to teach two subjects, and very little subject departure 
is permitted without salary penalty. 

In arranging their schedules, seniors should leave 
vacant at least three consecutive periods daily for 
Directed Teaching. Chapel attendance is not required 
of those whose assignments conflict. Cars are highly 
desirable, although not an absolute necessity. 

Students taking Directed Teaching are advised to 

141 



Education 

take no more than 12 semester hours, as the work in 
this course, though enjoyable and stimulating, is never- 
theless intensive and exacting. 

I Academic Requirements 

As specified by the State Department of Public In- 
struction: 

Bible and Religion — 21 hours, including 6 in Old Testament, 6 in New 
Testament, and 9 in electives. 

Commerce — 36 hours*, including 12 in Economics and Retailing, 12 
in Accounting and Office Management, 12 in Office Skills (short- 
hand, transcription, and typing), and minimum office experience. 

English — 30 hours, including English 1-2; 3 hours in Shakespeare, 3 
in American Literature, 3 in Advanced Grammar and Composi- 
tion (English 21 at WFC). English Literature and Speech are 
recommended. 

French — 24 hours (including 6 in spoken language) based on two or 
more high school units; otherwise, 30 hours. Quantitative re" 
quirements for teaching German and Spanish same as for French. 

Latin — 24 hours based on two or more high school units; otherwise 
30 hours. 

Mathematics — 21 hours, including 3 in College Algebra, 3 in Trigo- 
nometry, 3 in Analytic Geometry. Calculus, History of Mathe- 
matics, Mechanical Drawing, Astronomy, Statistics, Applied 
Mathematics, and Physics are recommended to complete the 
total of 21 hours. Although Physics and Astronomy are classified 
as sciences, as many as 3 hours in each will nevertheless count 
toward the certificate in Mathematics. At the same time, full 
credit will be allowed for Physics and Astronomy on the Science 
certificate. 

Music — 36 hours, including 18 hours of Applied Music for the Gen- 
eral Certificate and 21 hours of Applied Music for the Instru- 
mental Certificate. For further information, consult Music depart- 
ment section of this catalog. 

Health and Physical Education — 36 hours. For specific courses required, 
consult head of Physical Education department. 

Science — 30 hours**, including 6 in Biology, 6 in Chemistry, 6 in 



• Certification may be granted in individual areas as follows: Typewriting, 4 hours; 
Stenography, 11 hours (including 9 in Stenography and 2 in Typing); Bookkeeping, 16 
hours (including Accounting and Management); Basic Business 24 hours (including 
12 in Economics and 12 in Management and Accounting). 

•' See footnote next page. 

142 



Education 

Physics, 3 in Geography (Bus. Adm. 2) or Geology (Biol. 40), 
and electives to complete the total of 30. 

Social Studies — 30 hours*, including 6 in European or World History, 
6 in American History; 12 from one or more of the following: 
Government, Geography, Economics, Sociology; 6 in electives 
from any of the above. 

II Professional Requirements 

Candidates for the High School, Class A, certificate 
are required by the State Department of Public In- 
struction to have at least 18 hours in Education dis- 
tributed as follows: 6 hours in pupil-centered courses, 
6 related to the school as an institution, and 6 in di- 
rected teaching and practicum. To meet this require- 
ment a student must take Education courses num- 
bered 23, 31 (or 50), 33, 34, a methods course in one 
of the subjects for which certification is desired, and 
also one of these: 25, 26, 27, 35, 55. 

Courses 

23. Educational Psychology 

A course designed to foster an understanding of continuity in de- 
velopment from the intellectual, physical, social, and emotional 
viewpoints; the nature and process of learning, motivating forces, 
and mastery of fundamental theoretical concepts. 

M W F 3, 4; Spring term MWF3,4 Credit, 3 hours 

25. Extracurricular Activities 

An introduction to basic and legitimate school activities other than 
those regularly scheduled for unit credit. School publications, 
audio-visual aids, dramatics, forensics, musical organizations, home- 
room activities, etc., will be considered. 

Credit, 3 hours 

26. Audio-Visual Education 

A survey of the theory, history, and techniques of using visual aids. 

• Certification will be allowed in any of the individual social studies or sciences on 
the basis of 12 hours in a particular subject. This course should be followed only as a 
last resort, as teachers who are certified in broader areas are better equipped and have 
less difficulty in securing positions. The 12-hour plan is restricted to subjects in science 
and social studies fields. 

143 



Education 

Special attention is given to the contributions of various types of 
visual aids to an educational program. 

M W 7, T Th 2; third hour to be arranged; spring M W 7, T Th 2, 
third hour to be arranged Credit, 3 hours 

27. Social Foundations of Education 

A social approach to educational opinion and practices from the 
primitives down to the present era; emphasis on the school as a con- 
tributor to democratic living and community building. 

T Th S 2; spring term, T Th S 2, 4 Credit, 3 hours 

31. Measurement and Guidance 

Introductory course. A study of individual differences through 
statistical techniques as applied to mental and educational measure- 
ment; the interpretation and use of standard tests, the construction 
of informal objective tests, counseling, and audio-visual aids. 

M W F 2, 4; spring term, M W F 2,4 Credit, 3 hours 

33. Secondary Education 

An examination of the fundamental principles involved in the or- 
ganization and administration of the high school curriculum in the 
light of individual and social needs; adolescence, methods, lesson 
planning, and pupil accounting. 

M W F 1,3; T Th S 4; spring term, M W F 6; T Th S 1 

Credit, 3 hours 

34. Directed Teaching 

This course contains the specific activities identified with systematic 
and formal observations, supervised student teaching, and with 
varied activities related to the job of actual teaching, as specified by 
regulations of State Department of Public Instruction. Seniors only. 
C average, or higher, required in subject of certification. Seniors 
desiring a student teaching opportunity should reserve at least three 
consecutive class periods each day (MTWTF). Students taking this 
course are advised to take no more than 12 semester hours, as the 
work in Education 34, though enjoyable and stimulating, is neverthe- 
less intensive and exacting. 

Five hours to be arranged, each term Credit, 3 hours 

35. School Organization and Control 

A course offered upon the assumption that students entering the 
field of teaching should have sufficient information concerning the 
state, county, and city administration of education to stimulate a 
growing professional interest. Credit, 3 hours 

144 



Education 

50. Educational Guidance 

A consideration of modern techniques and procedures available for 
the job of counseling and guidance both in school and in later life; 
social adjustment, work opportunities, aptitude and educational 
testing, and appraisal of personal qualities. 

Offered only in summer Credit, 3 hours 

55. Educational Philosophy and Curriculum 
The place of the school in the American social order, an interpreta- 
tion of educational values, and a consideration of school curricula 
in the light of recognized objectives of education. Credit, 3 hours 



Methods and Materials 
With a functional approach, each of the following 
methods courses is designed to familiarize the prospec- 
tive teacher with those methods and materials which are 
actually used in the respective subjects in public high 
schools. Since all methods courses are not offered each 
semester, students who are eligible should schedule 
them early in their junior or senior years. 

36. Education — Teaching of Business Education Subjects 

40. Education — Teaching of Music 
M W F4 

41. Education — Band and Orchestra Methods 

42. Education — Teaching of Mathematics 
M WF 1 

43. Education — Teaching of Science 

44. Education — Teaching of Religion 
M W F3 

45. Education — Teaching of Health and Physical Education 
TThS2 

145 

10 



English 

46. Education — Teaching of Spanish 
T Th 2:00-3:15 

47. Education — Teaching of French 
T Th 2:00-3:15 

48. Education — Teaching of Social Studies 
M WF 1 

49. Education — Teaching of English 
M WF 1 



English 

Professors Snuggs, Folk, Wilson 
Associate Professors Aycock, Broderick, Brown 
Assistant Professors C. H. Dornbusch, Drake, 
W. O. Harris, Howren, * Phillips.* 
Instructors B. J. Davis, Eaton, Kenion, Ray- 
nor, Sanders, Wheeler 

Courses 1, 2 and 3, 4, for freshmen and sophomores, 
are prescribed for all degrees, and are prerequisites 
for admission to all advanced courses in English. 

A major in English requires 30 credit hours, of which 
18 must be taken in the junior and senior years in 
courses numbered above 20. The minimum requirement 
in literature for all English majors, including the Journal- 
ism sequence described at the head of section III 
following, is four advanced courses. 

Consult Summer Session Bulletin for courses offered 
only in the Summer Session. 



* Absent on leave 1900-61. 

146 



English 



*Writing 

1. English Composition 

A basic course in writing, which provides training in clear thinking 
and effective expression; frequent themes, corrective exercises, read- 
ing in modern prose, individual conferences; no credit given until 
the student has demonstrated ability to write satisfactorily. Students 
deficient in English may be required to meet five hours each week. 
Fall semester, M W F 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7; T Th S 1, 2, 4, 5; spring 
semester, MW F 5; T Th S 1,4 

lx. Composition Review 

Essentials of standard usage and the basic principles of unity and 
coherence in sentence and paragraph; frequent themes. Required 
of those who have been assigned "composition conditions" (see foot- 
note on this page). The course carries no credit; the class meets 
three hours per week. One may be dismissed from the class before 
the end of the term if, in the judgment of the instructor, one has 
demonstrated proficiency in composition. 
Fall semester, M W F 5 

2. Composition and Literature 

Study and practice in the several types of writing, with special atten- 
tion to the preparation of an investigative paper; readings in modern 
literature, with themes related to the reading; originality and indi- 
viduality of style emphasized. Prerequisite, English 1. 

Spring semester, M W F 1,2,3, 4, 5, 6, 7; T Th S 1, 2, 4, 5; fall 

semester, M W F 6; T Th S 1 

21. Advanced Grammar and Composition 

A study of modern English descriptive grammar with enough com- 
position to illustrate the fundamentals of writing; required for cer- 
tification in the teaching of English. Prerequisite, English 1-4. 
TThS5 



* Proficiency in the use of the English language, in oral reports and in writing, is 
recognized by the Faculty as a requirement in all departments. A composition con- 
dition, indicated by cc under the grade for any course, may be assigned in any depart- 
ment to a student above the freshman year whose writing is unsatisfactory, regardless 
of previous credits in composition. Removal of the composition condition, either 
through special work as directed by the English department or by repeating English 1 
(without credit hours), is prerequisite to graduation. The removal of the composition 
condition should begin the next semester after it is assigned. 

147 



English 

45. Essay Writing 

Primarily for those who are interested in writing for publication, 
with concentration on the various types of essays; wide reading 
in both modern and older essays; admission to the class only after 
conference with the instructor. Prerequisite, English 1-4. 

Tu 8-9 Credit, 2 hours 

46. Short Story Writing 

A study of the fundamental principles of short fiction writing, with 
much collateral reading in the short story, and constant practice 
in writing; admission by consent of the instructor. Prerequisite, 
English 1-4. 

Tu 8-9 Credit, 2 hours 

II 

Language and Literature 

3. Major American Writers * 

A study of major American writers, including Poe, Emerson, Haw- 
thorne, Thoreau, Melville, Whitman, Dickinson, and Mark Twain. 
Emphasis on reading rather than on literary history. Prerequisite, 
English 1-2. 

Fall semester, M W F 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7; T Th S 1, 2, 4; spring 

semester, M W F 4,7 

4. Major British Writers 

A study of major works of several British poets and prose writers, 
including Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, and Swift. 
Emphasis on reading rather than on literary history. Prerequisite, 
English 1-2. 

Spring semester, M W F 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7; T Th S 1, 2, 4; fall 

semester, M W F 4,7 

20. English Drama 

Reading of representative masterpieces of English dramatic litera- 
ture from the medieval beginnings through the eighteenth century, 
exclusive of Shakespeare; lectures on the history of the drama and 
the stage. Prerequisite, English 1-4. 

* This course is required of all sophomores in Wake Forest College, on the theory that 
every college student should have an introduction to the literature of his own country. 
It is not required of students who transfer from other standard institutions with credit 
for the regular one-year course in sophomore literature, regardless of the content. 

148 



English 

23. Chaucer 

An introduction to Chaucer as a literary artist and master story- 
teller, with emphasis on The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde 
studied in relation to sources, and to literary and social background. 
Prerequisite, English 1-4. 
MWF6 

24. Spenser 

Life and works of Edmund Spenser in relationship to the background 
of the Renaissance and to the Elizabethan era; concentration on 
The Faerie Queene. Prerequisite, English 1-4. 

26. Shakespeare 

An introduction to Shakespeare as a dramatist and poet in relation- 
ship to his predecessors and contemporaries; a study of representative 
plays in the approximate chronological order, with the reading of 
additional plays; attention to problems of biography, dramatic 
companies, theatres, sources and criticism. Prerequisite, English 1-4. 
Fall and spring semesters, M W F 4 

27. Milton 

A study of the poetical works of John Milton, with the concentration 
on Paradise Lost, and with the reading of selected prose; special at- 
tention to the life and personality of the author and to the literary 
and historical backgrounds of the era. 
T ThS2 

30. Eighteenth Century English Literature 

A study of representative works of the major writers from Defoe 
to Blake; special attention to the periodical essayists and to Pope, 
Swift, Johnson, Boswell, Goldsmith, Cowper, Burns, the current 
philosophies and literary theories. Prerequisite, English 1-4. 
M WF2 

31. Romantic Poets 

A rapid survey of the beginnings of romanticism in English litera- 
ture, followed by a study of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, 
and Shelley; collateral reading in the prose of the period. Prerequisite, 
English 1-4. 

M WF7 



149 



English 

33. Victorian Poets 

A study of Tennyson, Browning, Arnold and other representative 
poets as literary artists and as exponents of the literary, social and 
philosophical concepts of the era, 1 830 to 1 890. Prerequisite, English 
1-4. 

TThS4 

34. Victorian Prose 

A study in the prose, exclusive of fiction, of the major Victorian 
writers: Carlyle, Macaulay, Newman, Mill, Ruskin, Arnold, and 
others, as related to the life and thought of the period from about 
1825 to 1890. Prerequisite, English 1-4. 

35. The English Novel to 1832 

The history of the English novel from the Elizabethan era to 1832, 
chiefly through the reading and analysis of representative works 
which illustrate the evolution and progress of the form; emphasis on 
Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Austen, and Scott. Prerequisite, 
English 1-4. 
M WF3 

36. Victorian Novelists 

A study of Dickens, Thackeray, the Brontes, Eliot, Meredith, and 
Hardy, with some attention to their contemporaries; novels read 
and analyzed as representative of the author's purpose, style and 
technique; special attention to the social and literary background. 
Prerequisite, English 1-4. 
M W F3 

37. Twentieth Century Poetry 

A study of selected American and British poets of the twentieth 
century, with attention to the transition from post-Victorianism, the 
renaissance following 1912, experimentation, and present trends — a 
study of poetry as the product of the new era, and of poets as its 
interpreters. Prerequisite, English 1-4. 
M WF2 

38. Modern Drama 

Extensive reading in the works of representative European, British 
and American dramatists from Ibsen to the present, in approximately 

150 



English 

chronological order, with attention to purposes, themes, and the 
evolution of modern techniques. Prerequisite, English 1-4. 
M WF6 

40 . History of English Literature 

A co-ordinating course in literary history, beginning with the Anglo- 
Saxon era and continuing through the Victorian era; individual read- 
ing programs in the literature of the several literary periods, variable 
according to previous studies and future plans; chiefly for English 
majors in the senior year. Prerequisite, 18 hours of college English. 
M WF7 

41. American Fiction 

Studies in the novel and the short story, with reading of representative 
works of Cooper, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, James, and others. 
Prerequisite, English 1-4. 
M WF 5 

42. American Prose 

Studies in the thought of the nineteenth century, with the subject 
matter from Emerson and his contemporaries. Prerequisite, Eng- 
lish 1-4. 

M WF 5 

44. Whitman and His Contemporaries 

Studies in major American poets of the nineteenth century, with 
concentration on Walt Whitman. Prerequisite, English 1-4. 
M W F5 

49. Education — The Teaching of English 

A course which is credited as Education in the professional require- 
ment for a high school teacher's certificate. A thorough review of 
English grammar with emphasis on the functional approach; di- 
rections for and activity in teaching composition and literature for 
high school students; use of audio-visual aids. Prerequisites, senior 
standing, English major, and a superior record. 
M WF 1 

62. The Modern Novel 

Readings in recent fiction by continental, English, and American 
authors. 
TTh4 

151 



Journalism 

66. Literary Criticism 

Study of the basic principles of the great critics with practical 
application to specific literary works. 
Not offered 1961-62 

III 

Journalism 

For a career in the newspaper profession, breadth 
of academic background is essential. The following 
courses, which provide the fundamentals of professional 
training, are concerned with the basic principles of 
journalistic writing and editing, and with a conception 
of the newspaper as a whole. 

In planning a major in English, with the Journalism 
sequence, the student is advised to include courses in 
creative writing (45, 46), modern and contemporary- 
literature and American literature, with related courses 
in the social sciences. 

47. Journalistic Writing 

Survey of the fundamental principles of news-writing; study of news 
and news values, and of outstanding newspapers. Open to juniors 
and seniors, and to sophomores who obtain the permission of the 
instructor. Prerequisite, English 1-2. 
M W F4 

48. Copy-editing 

A laboratory course in copy-editing, headline-writing, typography, 
and make-up. Prerequisite, English 1-2, and 47. 

Hours to be arranged Credit, 2 hours 

50. Special Feature Articles 

Practice in writing articles for newspapers and magazines, with 
emphasis on selecting subjects, gathering material, and on the prep- 
aration and sale of manuscripts. Prerequisite, English 1-2, and 
preferably 47. 
T Th4 



152 



Art Appreciation 



51. The Editorial 

Analysis of editorial policies of typical newspapers, discussions of 
current events and topics calling for editorial expression, and practice 
in writing various types of editorials; a study of the fundamentals of 
public opinion, and what the editorial writer can do to influence 
thinking. Prerequisite, English 1-2, 47-48. 
TTh4 

52. History of American Journalism 

A study of the development of the American newspaper, with detailed 
investigations of representative papers and editors, and with special 
reference to the problems of present-day journalism. Prerequisite, 
English 1-2, 47-48. 

IV 

Art History and Appreciation 

Although the following courses, conducted by a 
member of the English staff, are not a part of the regu- 
lar English curriculum, the department recognizes 
their importance in a liberal education and their special 
value to students of literature. They may be included 
in the program of the English major. 

71. Ancient and Medieval Art 

A survey of the arts as they developed in Egyptian, Mesopotamian, 
Minoan, Greek, and Roman civilizations and Medieval Europe. 
Prerequisite, junior or senior standing. 
TTh7 

72. Renaissance and Modern Art 

A survey of the arts as they developed in Europe and the United 
States; emphasis on architecture, sculpture and painting. Prerequi- 
site, junior or senior standing. 
TTh7 



153 



History 

History 

Professors Stroupe, Perry 
Associate Professors Clonts, Smiley, Yearns 
Assistant Professors Gregory, Josserand, Mul- 
len, Tillett 
Instructor Hitchins* 
Visiting Professor Gokhale 

The major is 30 hours and must include six hours in 
Modern European history and six hours in United 
States history. History 1 and 2 are prerequisites for all 
other courses offered by the department. History 13 
and 14 are prerequisites for all other courses in United 
States history, with the exception that students of demon- 
strated ability who have not had History 13 and 14 may 
be admitted to advanced courses in this field with the 
written approval of their major adviser and the instructor 
concerned. The remaining 18 hours of the history major 
and 18 hours of required work in related fields are 
selected by the student and the history adviser. 

Consult Summer Session Bulletin for courses offered 
only in the Summer Session. 

1, 2. Modern Europe 

The political, economic, and social history of Europe in its world 
setting from the Renaissance to the present. Stresses major institu- 
tions, movements, and personalities shaping our western civilization. 
Assigned work includes text, parallel reading, and work in historical 
geography. Students majoring in history or political science should 
take this course their freshman year. History 1 prerequisite for 
History 2. 

History ljall semester, MWF1,2,3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8; TThSl, 2, 4; 
spring semester, M W F 5; T Th S 4 

History 2, Jail semester, M W F 5; T Th S 4; spring semester, MWF 
I, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7; T Th S 1,2,4 

* Absent on leave, 1960-61 



154 



History 

11, 12. The Ancient World 

Oriental and Greek history, fall semester; Roman history, spring 
semester. Textbook and written reports. Cultural aspects emphasized. 

T Th 6, 7, 8 

13, 14. The United States 

A general survey of United States history from the period of dis- 
covery and colonization to the present. The course is conducted 
through daily lectures, textbooks, collateral readings, and map 
studies. Social, economic, and intellectual developments are included, 
but political history is emphasized. History 13 covers the period 
from discovery to 1865; History 14 the period from 1865 to the 
present. Students majoring in history or political science should take 
this course in the sophomore year. History 13 prerequisite for 
History 14. 

MWF 1,3,4; TThS2 

17, 18. History and Civilization of Southeast Asia 

A survey of developments in the history and culture of Burma, 
Thailand, Malaya, Indonesia, and Indo-China from the earliest 
times to 1940. The course devotes special attention to religion, social 
organization, economy, Indian and Chinese influences, literature, 
art, and architecture in the region. 

M W F 2 

21, 22. The British Empire 

Fall semester: the rise of the second British Empire, 1783-1867, with 
emphasis on Canada, Australia, New Zealand, India, Cape Colony, 
and the West Indies. Spring semester: the development of the Com- 
monwealth and the evolution of the dependent Empire since 1867. 
M W F4 

23, 24. England 

A political and social survey, with some attention to important con- 
tinental movements. The period prior to 1603 is covered in the fall 
semester, the period since 1 603 in the spring semester. Recommended 
to students taking major work in English or law. 

MWF 2,4 



155 



History 

25, 26. Medieval Europe 

A general survey in which political, economic, social, and cultural 
aspects of the Middle Ages are studied. Collateral readings and oral 
reports on special topics are added to textbook assignments. History 
25 prerequisite for History 26. 
T Th4 

27. Historiography 

A survey of the principal historians and their writings from ancient 
times to the present, conducted through extensive readings, class 
discussions, written and oral reports. 
TTh7 

29, 30. The South 

A study of geography, population elements, basic institutions, and 
selected events, conducted largely by individual reports and involving 
extensive use of the library. 
TThS4 

31. North Carolina 

Selected phases of the development of North Carolina from colonial 
beginnings to the present are studied by means of lectures, maps, 
and readings. 
M WF 1 

32. American Diplomatic History 

An introduction to the history of American diplomacy since 1776, 
emphasizing the effects of public opinion on fundamental policies. 
M W F3 

33. 34. Modern India 

A course devoted to an intensive study of developments in India 
from 1600 to the present with special reference to the Islamic and 
Western impacts, changes in economy and society, cultural progress, 
constitutional developments, and nationalism. In the spring term 
the emergence of freedom, the Indian Constitution and Plans, elec- 
tions, and India's role in internationl affairs are emphasized. This 
course may count as History or Political Science, but not both. At 
the time of registration the student must determine in which field 
credit is desired. 
M W F8 



156 



History 

36. Economic History of the United States 

A general survey of the economic development of the United States 
from colonial beginnings to the present, conducted through daily 
discussions, textbook assignments, and collateral readings. This 
course may count as History or Business Administration, but not 
both. At the time of registration the student must determine in which 
field credit is desired. 
MWF6 

2>1. Recent European History 

A review of World War I followed by intensive study of the problems 
of peace, rise of new governments, collapse of collective security, 
World War II, and the postwar era. Library readings and textbooks. 
M WF3 

39. Latin America 

A study of the development of Latin America from its colonial 
origins to the present. Textbook and collateral readings. 
M WF 1 

40. American Constitutional History 

A study of the origins of our constitutional system, the controversies 
involving the nature of the union, constitutional readjustments to 
meet the new American industrialism, and the modern Constitution. 
Textbook and collateral reading. {Not offered in 1961-62) 
TThS2 

41. 42. The Renaissance and Reformation 

This is a study of the transition of Europe from medieval to modern 
times. The emphasis is on artistic, literary, and religious achieve- 
ments, with some attention given to political and economic develop- 
ments. 

TTh8 

43. The French Revolution and Napoleon 

A brief analysis of the Enlightenment and of the social, economic, 
and political structure of the Old Regime; the development of the 
revolution from 1789 to the advent of Napoleon; the impact of the 
revolution and of Napoleon upon Europe. 
MWF2 



157 



Mathematics 



44. Europe in the Nineteenth Century 

The political, social, economic, and cultural developments of 
nineteenth-century Europe. Topics emphasized include the conflict 
between liberalism and conservatism; the industrial revolution and 
the rise of socialism; the growth of nationalism, realism, and material- 
ism; and the background of World War I. 
MWF2 

45, 46. Russia 

Primarily a political survey, with some attention to cultural and 
social developments. Fall semester, the Russian Empire; spring 
semester, the Soviet Union. Textbook and outside readings. 
M WF6 

48. Teaching of Social Studies 

An examination of the theories and procedures involved in the teach- 
ing of history, geography, civics, economics, and sociology in second- 
ary schools. The principal emphasis is on history. Open to students 
who expect certification in one or more of the social studies. Credited 
as Education. 
M WF 1 



Mathematics 

Professor Gentry 

Associate Professors Gay, K. T. Raynor, Saw- 
yer, Seelbinder 
Assistant Professor Johnson 
Instructors Miller, Womble 

This department offers basic courses in each of the 
main divisions of mathematics: algebra, analysis, 
geometry, applied mathematics. 

A major in this department (33 hours) must include 
courses 11, 12, 13, 25, 31, 36, 47, 49. 

Any student preparing to teach mathematics in the 
secondary school should include in their program 
courses 11, 12, 13, 25, 33, 36, 49. 

158 



Mathematics 



1. Intermediate Algebra 

A basic course in algebra starting with the fundamental operations 
and going through linear equations, systems of linear equations, 
exponents and radicals and quadratic equations. This course is 
offered without credit to students whose preparation is inadequate. 
M WF 1,3,7; T Th S 4 

2. Principles of Mathematics 

An introduction including a definition and examples of deductive 
reasoning, inductive reasoning, abstract logic, abstract mathematical 
science, pure and applied mathematics. A study of set theory as an 
application. A study of the real number system using an axiomatic 
approach. Many examples taken from arithmetic, algebra, trigo- 
nometry and analytic geometry. Any student receiving credit for 
Math 2 will not receive credit for Math 5. 
MWF4, TThS 1 

5, 6. Introduction to Mathematical Analysis 

An introduction to series, limits, derivatives and antiderivatives. A 
thorough study of (a) polynomial equations of first, second and higher 
degrees in one or more variables, (b) algebraic, exponential, logarith- 
mic, trigonometric and inverse functions, (c) identities, (d) conic 
sections, (e) polar, cylindrical, spherical coordinates and transfor- 
mation of coordinates and (f) parameters. Any student receiving 
credit for Math 5 will not receive credit for Math 2. 
MWF 1; TThS 2 

11, 12, 13. Calculus with Analytic Geometry 7, II, III 

A study of differential and integral calculus and an investigation 
of the basic ideas of analytic geometry as they arise. 

M W F 2, 3, 6; Spring Semester T T S 2, 4 Credit, 3 hours each 
semester 

16. Mechanical Drawing 

Use of drawing instruments, lettering, free-hand sketching, pro- 
jections, tracing, working drawings, maps, blue printing, and the 
elements of architectural and structural drawing. 

MWF 3; Lab. T 6,7 Credit, 2 hours 

17. Surveying 

The use of engineering equipment. Surveying and engineering 
practices, government system of division and sub-division of land ; 

159 



Mathematics 



deed description, lot and farm boundaries; topographical surveying, 
making of contour maps, observations for determination of meridian 
and latitude, reducing field notes, plotting, blue printing, use of 
slide rule, etc. 

7* Th 4; Lab. T 6, 7 Credit, 3 hours 

23, 24. Modern Finite Mathematics with Analysis 

A study of mathematics as it pertains to social science and business 
today. Emphasis will be placed on development of mathematical 
models, probability, matrices, linear programming, decision theory, 
and theory of games. The second half will include topics from analytic 
geometry and calculus; also a study of the linear, parabolic and 
hyperbolic laws with an introduction to differential and integral 
calculus. Applications including maxima and minima problems and 
curve fitting will be included. No student will be allowed credit for 
both math 24 and math 11. 

M W F 2, 4; T T S 2, 4 Credit, 3 hours each semester 

25. Linear Algebra 

A study of vectors and vector spaces, linear transformations and 
matrices, linear groups and determinants. 
M W F 3; spring semester, T T S 4 

26. History of Mathematics 

A study of the development of mathematics, dealing with the evo- 
lution of the number system, arithmetic, geometry, algebra, trigo- 
nometry, etc., together with a study of the lives of the leading 
mathematicians. Recommended for those of junior standing who 
expect to teach mathematics. 
TThS4 

31. Topics in Calculus 

A review of curves and surfaces in three space along with a study of 
partial differentiation, multiple integration, series and an introduc- 
tion to differential equations. 
TThS4 

32. Modern Geometry 

Recent geometry of the triangle and circle, based on the principles 
of Euclidean geometry. Recommended for teachers. 
M WF 1 

33. 34. Statistics 

A study of the elementary theory and applications, with particular 

160 



Mathematics 



emphasis on the mathematical development of probability distribu- 
tions, finite population sampling, estimation, testing of hypotheses 
and confidence methods. One who takes either of these courses may 
not receive credit for Bus. Ad. 37, Sociology 43, or Psychology 43. 
Prerequisite, Math 1 1 . 

M W F 6 Credit, 3 hours each semester 

36. Foundations of Geometry 

A course of logic in geometry with special emphasis on postulates, 
systems of geometry, etc. Recommended for teachers. Prerequisite, 
Mathematics 29. 
TThS 1 

37. Introduction to Topology 

An axiomatic treatment of the theory of point sets. Topological 
properties of Euclidean spaces, metric spaces and Hausdorff spaces 
will be studies. 
T TS 1 

38. Differential Equations 

A study of the more common types of ordinary differential equations 
with emphasis on their practical application to geometry and physics. 
M WF6 

40. Projective Geometry 

Synthetic and analytic treatment centering around Desargue's 
Theorem and the principle of projectivity. 
TThS 2 

42. Education — The Teaching of Mathematics 

The objectives and content of the many proposals for change in our 
curriculum and texts. The techniques, relative merits, and role of 
such teaching procedures as the inductive and deductive approaches 
to new ideas. The literature of mathematics and its teaching. The 
underlying ideas of elementary mathematics and the manner in 
which they may provide a rational basis for teaching. 
M W F 1 

45, 46. Theory of Numbers 

An introduction to the properties of integers, congruences, a study of 
Theorems of Fermat and Wilson, primitive roots, arithmetic func- 
tions, quadratic reciprocity, sums of squares. 

Hours to be arranged Credit, 3 hours each semester 

161 

11 



Military Science 



47, 48. Advanced Calculus 

Continuity and differentiation of functions of one and several vari- 
ables. Taylor's expansion with applications; definite, improper, 
infinite, double, triple integrals; infinite series, power series. 

Hours to be arranged Credit, 3 hours each semester 

49, 50. Modern Algebra 

A study of groups, fields, rings, determinants, matrices, linear de- 
pendence, linear transformations, quadratic and bilinear forms. 

Hours to be arranged Credit, 3 hours each semester 

51,52. Theory of Functions 

Limits, implicit functions, power series, double series, Cauchy's 

Theorem and its applications, residues, Riemann surfaces, conformal 

mapping. 

Hours to be arranged Credit, 3 hours each semester 

54. Descriptive Geometry 

The elementary principles and propositions of the science of descrip- 
tive geometry, covering orthographic projection, spherical projection, 
shades and shadows, linear perspective, and isometric drawing. 

M W 5 Credit, 2 hours 



Military Science and Tactics 

Colonel J. F. Reed, Professor 
Major P. G. Dillon, Assistant Professor 
Captain L. D. Prather, Assistant Professor 
Master Sergeant L. B. Bonner, Assistant in 

Instruction 
Master Sergeant D. C. Mooney, Assistant 
Sergeant First Class W. J. Stanley, Assistant 

in Instruction 
Sergeant First Class E. Quesinberry, Assistant 
Sergeant C. E. Girndt, Assistant 
Mrs. Marguerite L. Ketchie, Secretary 
Mrs. Dorothy E. Dawson, Librarian 



162 



Military Science 



A senior unit of the United States Army Reserve 
Officers' Training Corps was established at Wake Forest 
College in 1951. The general objective of the program 
of instruction is to produce junior officers possessing the 
leadership and other attributes essential to their pro- 
gressive and continued development as Reserve Officers 
in the United States Army. 

The ROTC program is divided into a Basic Course 
(academic freshmen and sophomores) and an Advanced 
Course (academic juniors and seniors). 

The purpose of the Basic Course is to increase initia- 
tive and confidence in the student, to develop his 
capacity for leadership, to provide training in military 
subjects common to all branches of the Army, and to 
lay a foundation for intelligent citizenship. 

A student planning to enroll as a Basic Course cadet 
is required to present a physician's certificate that he 
is physically qualified to participate in ROTC training. 

Except when credit for military school ROTC, pre- 
vious active duty training or military service is allowed, 
failure to enroll in the ROTC as an academic freshman 
will preclude the student from participation in the 
program. Transfer students who have previously en- 
rolled in any Department of Defense ROTC program 
may be continued in the Army ROTC at Wake Forest 
College. 

Military Science courses in the minimum amount 
required by the ROTC program will be considered 
among other credits offered for admission to the School 
of Law of Wake Forest College. 

The Advanced Course is designed to develop further 
the objectives of the Basic Course and to enable selected 
students to qualify for commissions as Reserve Officers 
in the United States Army. 

163 



Military Science 



Advanced Course ROTC students receive a monetary- 
allowance of approximately $27.00 per month. This 
allowance is payable from the day of enrollment at the 
beginning of the student's junior year until the end of 
his senior year. This allowance is not drawn during the 
six-week summer camp which the Advanced Course 
ROTC student attends at the conclusion of his junior 
year. All summer camp expenses, including travel 
incident thereto, are paid by the Government. While at 
camp the student is paid at the rate of $78.00 per month. 
Total remuneration for the Advanced Course is about 
$650.00. 

Upon graduation, students who have completed the 
Advanced Course receive commissions as Second Lieu- 
tenants in the United States Army Reserve. Graduating 
students who have demonstrated leadership, scholarship 
and military aptitude to an outstanding degree may be 
designated "Distinguished Military Graduates." These 
selected individuals are afforded an opportunity to 
apply for a Regular Army Commission. 

Once enrolled in either the Basic or Advanced Course 
successful completion, to include Summer Camp for 
Advanced Course students, is a prerequisite for gradua- 
tion from the college. 

ROTC students meeting prescribed requirements may 
receive deferment from selective service. In certain 
cases deferment may be continued while the student is 
engaged in post graduate study. 

Students pursuing the 3-2 Engineering or Forestry 
Program, explained on pages 125-27, who complete 
the basic ROTC course at Wake Forest College may be 
considered for the Advanced Army or Air Force ROTC 
Course at the cooperating institution under the follow- 
ing conditions: 

164 



Military Science 



a. To transfer to North Carolina State College Army 
ROTC, all necessary arrangements for entrance in the 
third or fourth year of ROTC may be accomplished 
through the Wake Forest College ROTC Department. 

b. To transfer to Duke University or North Carolina 
State College Air Force ROTC for entrance in the Ad- 
vanced Course: 

(1) Be found physically qualified by an Air Force 
Physician. 

(2) Make satisfactory scores on the Air Force Officer 
Qualification test. 

(3) Be recommended by the cooperating institution's 
AFROTC Advanced Selection Board. 

(4) Receive an Air Force production quota for the 
production period which the student wishes to enter. 

(5) Make personal application for entrance to the 
appropriate institution during the third year at Wake 
Forest College. 

The ROTC Cadet Corps is organized as a modified 
Battle Group to provide maximum opportunities for the 
exercise of leadership. It includes a Band and Drill 
Team. Both of these organizations receive special train- 
ing and represent Wake Forest College in special events. 

Students are furnished U. S. Army uniforms, ROTC 
textbooks and other military equipment without charge. 
A $20.00 uniform deposit is required of each ROTC 
student. The deposit, less a small cleaning charge and 
charges for loss or damage, is refunded at the end of the 
school year or upon withdrawal from the course. 

The national honorary military societies of Scabbard 
and Blade and Pershing Rifles have chapters at Wake 
Forest College. Membership, on an elective basis, is 
open to ROTC cadets. 

165 



Military Science 



The ROTC Rifle Team competes with other colleges 
and universities each year; both shoulder-to-shoulder 
and postal matches are fired. This activity is recognized 
as a minor sport at Wake Forest College. All practice 
firing and each match is supervised by a regular army 
instructor. The firing is conducted with modern small 
bore target rifles on an indoor range. 

Following are the awards presented annually to 
ROTC cadets at Wake Forest College: 

The President's Trophy. A trophy awarded by the 
President of Wake Forest College to a senior cadet for 
excellence in citizenship, scholarship, leadership and 
military science. 

Superior Cadet Ribbon Award. The Superior Cadet 
Ribbon with certificate and lapel device is presented by 
the Department of the Army to the one outstanding 
cadet in each ROTC class recommended by the Pro- 
fessor of Military Science and the Dean of the College 
after a review of records by a faculty board. 

ROTC Certificate of Meritorious Leadership Achievement. 
This award consists of a framed, engraved certificate 
signed by the Commanding General, Third United 
States Army. It is presented to the graduating cadet 
selected by the President of Wake Forest College as 
having demonstrated throughout his ROTC career 
highest standards of discipline, initiative, stability, 
application, physical conditioning, mental and moral 
fibre and that he has achieved proficiency in the proper 
application of the principles of leadership. 

The Professor of Military Science Award. A complete 
set of military insignia awarded to a graduating senior 

166 



Military Science 



cadet for outstanding service to the ROTC Battle 
Group. 

The American Legion ROTC Medal. Awarded by the 
American Legion to a basic course cadet who has 
demonstrated outstanding qualities of military efficiency. 

The " Minute- Man" Medal. The North Carolina 
Society, Sons of the American Revolution, awards a 
medal to one Advanced Course and one Basic Course 
cadet selected by the Professor of Military Science as 
outstanding in leadership, soldierly bearing, and aca- 
demic excellence. 

Association of the United States Army Medal. Awarded 
by the Association of the United States Army to the 
Advanced Course Cadet selected by the Professor of 
Military Science and the Dean of the College as out- 
standing in leadership, scholarship, and character. 

The Reserve Officers' Association of the United States 
Award. The North Carolina Department of the Re- 
serve Officers' Association of the United States presents 
a medal to an outstanding graduating cadet selected 
by the Professor of Military Science. Certificates of 
Merit may also be awarded to other outstanding gradu- 
ating cadets selected by the Professor of Military Science. 

Armed Forces Chemical Association Medal and Scroll. 
Awarded by the Armed Forces Chemical Association 
to a graduating cadet who excells in chemistry or an 
allied science and in military science. 

U. S. Armor Association RO TC Award. The outstand- 
ing graduate choosing Armor as his basic branch is 
presented with a year's membership in the U. S. Armor 
Association and also receives a package of books from 
the Association. 

167 



Military Science 



National Society of Scabbard and Blade Medal. Com- 
pany L, Eleventh Regiment, National Society of Scab- 
bard and Blade, Wake Forest College, awards a medal 
to one cadet in each ROTC class for outstanding ability 
in military science. 

Pershing Rifle Trophy. Company D, Fourth Regi- 
ment, National Society of Pershing Rifles, Wake Forest 
College, awards a trophy to the Basic Course cadet ad- 
judged the winner of the Annual Individual Drill Com- 
petition. 

Marksmanship Qualification Badges. Sterling silver 
qualification badges are awarded to cadets who qualify 
in prescribed marksmanship courses with the caliber 
.22 rifle. 

Marksmanship Trophies. Appropriate trophies are 
awarded to members of the ROTC rifle team with the 
highest scores in rifle team match firing. 

1,2. Military Science (First Tear Basic) 

Includes a study of military organization; individual weapons and 
marksmanship; The United States Army and national security; and 
leadership. One hour theory, two hours leadership laboratory. 
(Plus academic subject, see note below). Credit, 1 hour each semester 

11, 12. Military Science (Second Tear Basic) 

Includes a study of American military history; map and aerial photo- 
graph reading; introduction to basic tactics and techniques; and lead- 
ership. Two hours theory, two hours leadership laboratory. Pre- 
requisite: Military Science 1 and 2.* Credit, 2 hours each semester 

21, 22. Military Science (First Tear Advanced) 

Includes a study of leadership problems; military teaching principles; 
branches of the Army; small unit tactics and communications; and 



* Unless credit is given for previous military science or training. 

168 



Military Science 



leadership. Class meets 75 hours for the year; two hours per week 
leadership laboratory. (Plus academic subject, see note below). 
Prerequisite: Military Science 11 and 12.* Credit: 2 hours each semester 

31, 32. Military Science {Second Tear Advanced) 
Includes a study of operations; logistics; Army administration; mili- 
tary law; The United States in world affairs; service orientation; and 
leadership. Class meets 75 hours for the year; two hours per week 
leadership laboratory. (Plus academic subject, see note below). 
Prerequisite: Military Science 21 and 22.* 

Credit: 2 hours each semester 



Note. For basic course students any course selected from the areas 
listed below of a minimum of two (2) credit hours taken either se- 
mester is required the first year to satisfy the basic course requirement. 

For advanced course students any course selected from the areas 
listed below of a minimum of three (3) credit hours, and which is 
not a course required to satisfy the basic requirement of the major 
field of study, is required each year to satisfy the advanced course 
requirement. Satisfactory completion of each such course under- 
taken will be a prerequisite to commissioning. 

Area I Effective Communication. 

Area II Science Comprehension. 

Area III General Psychology. 

Area IV Political Development and Political Institutions. 

The PMS will evaluate and approve elective subjects selected by 
the student. 



* Unless credit is given for previous military science or training. 



169 



French 

Modern Languages 

A major in this department requires 30 hours in one 
of the Modern Languages. 

A language laboratory of twenty-five student booths 
has been in operation since September 1960 Students 
enrolled in language courses numbered 1, 2, 3, and 4, 
are required to spend one hour per week in the labora- 
tory as part of their class preparation. 



I 

French 
Professor Parcell 

Associate Professors Parker, Shoemaker 
Assistant Professor Robinson 
Instructor Staley 

1,2. Elementary French 

A course for beginners, covering the principles of French grammar, 
and the reading of elementary texts. The equivalent of two years 
of French in high schools. Credit, 3 hours each semester 

3, 4. Intermediate French 

A continuation of grammar and composition. Translation of a 
number of texts with a view to building up a vocabulary and ac- 
quiring facility in pronunciation and sight reading. Prerequisite, 
French 1, 2 or its equivalent. Credit, 3 hours each semester 

21, 22. Introduction to French Literature 

Reading of selected texts. Parallel reading and reports. Drill in 
grammar, at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisite, French 
3, 4 or its equivalent. Credit, 3 hours each semester 

25. Medieval French Literature 

A survey of French literature of the Middle Ages with cultural and 
political backgrounds. Translation of selected masterpieces in origi- 
nal form and modern transcription; lectures, parallel reading and 

170 



French 

reports. Conducted in English. Prerequisite, French 21, 22 or its 
equivalent. (Not offered in 1961-62) 
M W F 2 

26. Sixteenth Century French Literature 

After a brief consideration of the historical background, a survey 
of the outstanding writers of the sixteenth century. Lectures, parallel 
readings and reports. Conducted in English. Occasional lectures 
and discussions in French. Prerequisite, French 21, 22 or its equiva- 
lent. (Not offered in 1961-62) 
M W F 2 

27. French Romanticism 

A study of the chief French romantic poets. A considerable amount 
of the poetry of Lamartine, Musset, Hugo and Vigny read in class, 
supplemented with parallel reading. Lectures and reports. Con- 
ducted in English. Prerequisite, French 21, 22 or its equivalent. 
(Not offered in 1961-62. 
M W F 2 

29. Eighteenth Century French Literature 

A survey of French philosophical and political literature of the 
eighteenth century. Emphasis on Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, 
Rousseau, and U Encyclopedic . Intensive and extensive reading, 
lectures, and reports. Prerequisite, French 21, 22 or its equivalent. 
T ThS 2 

30. The French Novel 

A study of several masterpieces in the field of the novel, including 
representative selections from the conte and the nouvelle. The develop- 
ment of the novel from the seventeenth century to the early twentieth 
century. Lectures, parallel reading and reports. Prerequisite, French 
21, 22 or its equivalent. (Not offered in 1961-62) 
T Th S 4 

31. 32. Seventeenth Century French Literature 

After a brief consideration of the historical background, a survey 
of the outstanding writers of the classical age. Lectures, parallel 
reading and reports. Conducted in English. Occasional lectures 
and discussions in French. Prerequisite, French 21, 22 or its equiva- 
lent. 

M WF2 

171 



French 



34. Moliere 

Intensive study of the plays. Some translation in class. Parallel 
reading, lectures and reports. Occasional lectures and discussions 
in French. Prerequisite, French 21, 22 or its equivalent. 
M W F 2 

35. Trends in French Poetry 

Poetic theory and practice in France from the Renaissance to the 
Revolution, and from about 1850 to the present. A considerable 
amount of poetry from both periods will be studied in class. The 
romantic poets will be considered briefly in order to maintain the 
over-all perspective. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Prerequisite, 
French 21, 22 or its equivalent. 
TTkS4 

36. Racine 

Intensive study of the plays. Some translation in class. Parallel 
reading, lectures and reports. Occasional lectures and discussions 
in French. Prerequisite, French 21, 22 or its equivalent. (Mot offered 
in 1961-62) 
M W F 5 

37 '. Nineteenth Century French Drama 

An intensive study of the principal dramatic works, and a considera- 
tion of the related literary movements which evolved during the 
course of the nineteenth century in France. Lectures, parallel 
readings, oral and written reports. Prerequisite, French 21, 22 or 
is equivalent. (Not offered in 1961-62) 
T ThS 4 

39. French Literature of the Twentieth Century 

An analysis of the currents in French literature during the first half 
of the twentieth century, beginning with a brief survey of the trends 
which are carried over from the last century. Representative works 
of the foremost prose writers and dramatists will be studied in detail. 
Lectures in English and/or French, supplemental readings, oral and 
written reports. Prerequisite, French 21, 22 or its equivalent. 
M W F3 

41, 42. French Conversation and Composition 

A course stressing practice in speaking and writing French. Re- 

172 



German 

quired of those who plan to teach French in high school. Prerequisite, 
French 21, 22 or its equivalent. 
M W F7 

47. Education — The Teaching of French 

A survey of methodology of general principles in the teaching of 
Romance Languages in secondary schools. Particular attention is 
paid to the teaching of grammar, reading methods, pronunciation 
and oral work and conversational languages. Realia materials 
examined and evaluated. Some attention is given to the possibilities 
now being developed in languages for the elementary school. 

T Th S 2 Credit, 3 hours 



II 

German 

*Professor O'Flaherty 
Visiting Professors Breisacher, Shears 
Assistant Professor Anne Tillett 
Instructors J. G. Anderson, Snyder 

1, 2. Elementary German 

An introduction to German grammar. Much oral and aural practice. 
Reading of simple texts. Credit, 3 hours each semester 

3, 4. Intermediate German 

Continuation of the study of German grammar. Class reading of 
some 200 pages or more of German prose. Oral and aural practice. 
Sight translation. Prerequisite, German 1, 2 or its equivalent. 
MWF 2,3,5, 6; T Th S 2, 4 

6. Intermediate Scientific German 

A one-semester course in scientific German on the intermediate level 
Continuation of grammar review. Class reading of approximately 
100 pages of simple scientific prose from the fields of Chemistry, 
Physics and Biology. Prerequisite, German 1, 2, 3 or equivalent. 

Credit, 3 hours 
* Absent on leave, 1960-61. 

173 



German 

21, 22. Introduction to German Literature 

The object of this course is to acquaint the student with German cul- 
ture as reflected in the recognized masterpieces of German literature. 
Prerequisite, German 3, 4. Credit, 3 hours each semester 

23. Goethe 

Faust Part 1 will be studied in class. Parallel readings in other works 
by Goethe will be assigned. Prerequisite, German 21, 22. 
TThS4 

24. Schiller 

Readings in Schiller's dramas, ballads, and critical essays will be 
emphasized. Prerequisite, German 21, 22. 
M W F2 

28. The German Lyric 

Intensive class study of examples of the modern German lyric from 
Klopstock to Rilke. Lyrics are studied not only as poetic forms, but 
also as expressions of the experience and world-view of the writer. 
Prerequisite, German 21, 22. 
TThS4 

29. Twentieth Century German Prose 

Emphasis in this course is placed on Hauptmann, Hesse, Mann, 
Rilke, and Kafka. Class readings in these authors are supplemented 
by parallel readings in other contemporary prose writers. Prerequi- 
site, German 21, 22. 
T ThS 1 

33. Nineteenth Century Drama 

Class readings from Kleist, Grillparzer, Hebbel, Wagner, Haupt- 
mann, and Schnitzler. Parallel readings in other dramatists of the 
nineteenth century. Prerequisite, German 21, 22. 
M W F 5 

34. The German Novelle From Goethe to Thomas Mann 
Class readings in Goethe, Kleist, Tieck, Keller, Storm, C. F. Meyer, 
Thomas Mann and others. Prerequisite, German 21, 22. 

M W F 6 

174 



Spanish 

41, 42. German Conversation and Composition 

A course in spoken and written German. This course is required of 
those who plan to teach German in high school. Prerequisite, 
German 21, 22 or its equivalent. Credit, 3 hours each semester 



III 

Hindi 
1,2. Elementary Hindi 

Basic Hindi grammar and vocabulary. The course is primarily de- 
signed to give the student enough knowledge of the language to 
read newspapers and simple Hindi books. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester 

IV 

Russian 
Assistant Professor Anne Tillett 

1,2. Elementary Russian 

The essentials of Russian grammar and the reading of elementary 
texts. Admission with the consent of the instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester 
3, 4. Intermediate Russian 

Continuation of the study of Russian grammar, with practice in 
conversation and composition. Reading of selected texts. Prerequisite 
Russian 1, 2 or its equivalent. Credit, 3 hours each semester 

V 

Spanish 

Associate Professor Parker 
Instructors J. G. Anderson, Delgado, King, 
Spade, Staley 

1, 2. Elementary Spanish 

A course for beginners, covering grammar essentials, pronunciation, 
dictation, and reading of simple prose. Credit, 3 hours each semester 

175 



Spanish 

3, 4. Intermediate Spanish 

A review of grammar and composition with practice in conversation. 
Reading of selected texts. Prerequisite, Spanish 1, 2 or its equivalent. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester 

21, 22. Introduction to Spanish Literature 

A survey of Spanish literature from the Middle Ages to the contempo- 
rary period. Parallel reading and reports. Prerequisite, Spanish 
3, 4 or its equivalent. Credit, 3 hours each semester 

23. Spanish American Literature 

A general survey of Spanish American literature from the Colonial 
through the contemporary period, including selections from repre- 
sentative novels, short stories, essays, and poetry. Parallel reading 
and reports. Prerequisite, Spanish 3, 4. {Not offered in 1961-62) 

Credit, 3 hours 

25. The Golden Age 

A study of the literature of the Golden Age with emphasis upon the 
dramatic works of Alarc6n and Lope de Vega; supplementary read- 
ings in Guillen de Castro, Tirso de Molina, Calder6n, Rojas and 
More to. Prerequisite, Spanish 21, 22 or its equivalent. 
M W F2 

26. Spanish Prose Fiction Before Cervantes 

A historical and critical analysis of the several types of prose fiction 
which developed in Spain prior to the appearance of the Quixote 
in 1605. Readings include La carcel de amor, El caballero Cifar, Amadis 
de Gaula, La Diana, Lazarillo de Tormes, and Guzman de Alfarache. 
Lectures and readings provide the foundation for class discussion of 
the sentimental, chivalric, pastoral, Moorish, and picaresque novels 
as forerunners of the prose masterpiece by Cervantes. 

Credit, 3 hours 

27. Cervantes 

Intensive study of the life and works of Cervantes, with special 
emphasis on the Quixote and the exemplary novels. Lectures, parallel 
reading and reports. Prerequisite, Spanish 21, 22 or its equivalent. 
M W F 5 

28. The Spanish Romantic Drama 

An intensive study of Spanish Romanticism with emphasis on the 

176 



Spanish 

drama. Lectures, classroom discussions, parallel reading and reports. 
Prerequisite, Spanish 21, 22 or its equivalent. {Not offered in 1961-62) 
M WF4 

29. The Modern Spanish Novel 

An extensive study of representative Spanish novels, beginning with 
the works of the "Generation of '98" and continuing up to the con- 
temporary period. Lectures, classroom discussions, parallel reading 
and reports. Prerequisite, Spanish 21, 22 or its equivalent. 
M WF 5 

30. The Modern Spanish Drama 

An intensive study of the principal Spanish dramatic works of the 
present century, beginning with the "Generation of '98" and con- 
tinuing up to the contemporary period. Lectures, classroom discus- 
sions, dramatic criticism, parallel reading and reports. Prerequisite, 
Spanish 21, 22 or its equivalent. 
M WF 5 

41, 42. Spanish Conversation and Composition 

A course stressing practice in speaking and writing Spanish. Required 
of those who plan to teach Spanish in high schools. Prerequisite. 
Spanish 3, 4 or its equivalent. 
T ThS4 

46. Education — The Teaching of Spanish 

A survey of methodology of general principles in the teaching of 
Romance Languages in secondary schools. Particular attention is 
paid to the teaching of grammar, reading methods, pronunciation 
and oral work and conversational languages. Realia materials 
examined and evaluated. Some attention is given to the possibilities 
now being developed in languages for the elementary school. 

T Th 2:00-3:15 Credit, 3 hours 



177 

12 



Music 

Music 

Professor McDonald 
Associate Professor P. S. Robinson 
Assistant Professor Giles 
Instructor Head 

Visiting Teachers Bair, Decker, Deiner, Goble, 
Harris, Jacobowsky, Medlin, Woolf 

A major in this department requires 36 hours divided 
between Applied Music (18-21 hours), Music Theory 
(9-12 hours, including Music 7, 8), and Musical Culture 
(minimum of 6 hours). In addition, the music major 
must present a minimum of four hours resident * En- 
semble credit and demonstrate performing ability in 
student recitals. At the discretion of the music faculty 
a public recital will also be required. All music majors 
are required to attend all faculty and student recitals. 
No student taking an applied music course may per- 
form publicly without the permission of the instructor. 

Students desiring State Teacher Certification in Music 
should note the requirement of 18 hours of applied 
music (including 6 hours of Piano and 6 hours of Voice) 
for the General Music Certificate and 21 hours of ap- 
plied music (including a proficiency equivalent to Piano 
4a) for the Instrumental Music Certificate. 

I 

Music Theory 

1 . Fundamentals 

A study of the rudiments of music and its terminology, scales, keys, 

intervals, chords, rhythms, abbreviations, embellishments and smaller 

forms as they apply to performance, vocally and at the keyboard. 

• No student may register for more than one hour of Ensemble credit each semester 
Not more than eight hours Ensemble credit will be counted toward graduation. 

178 



Music 

This course is primarily for students not majoring in music and for 
music majors (without credit) having a deficiency in music theory. 
M W F4 

5, 6. Sight Singing and Ear Training 

Music reading as it applies to vocal and keyboard performance. 
Rhythms in scale and interval singing, Ear training based on chord 
study equal to diatonic harmony. Aural study of the basic forms. 
Prerequisite, Music 1 or equivalent. 
M W F7 

7, 8. Harmony 

The study of triads, seventh and ninth chords and their inversions. 
Melody harmonization and practical composition involving modula- 
tion in the smaller forms. It is recommended that whenever possible 
Sight Singing and Harmony be taken concurrently. 

Hours to be arranged Credit, 3 hours each semester 

23, 24. Advanced Harmony 

The study of melody harmonization and composition in the smaller 
forms involving chromatic chords and non-harmonic tones. Analysis 
of passages drawn from standard literature. Prerequisite, Music 7, 8. 
M W F 3 

31, 32. Counterpoint 

Strict counterpoint in the five species with one to five voices. Also 
a study of the free, modern or post-harmonic counterpoint. Pre- 
requisite, Music 7, 8. 

Hours to be arranged Credit, 3 hours each semester 

35, 36. Keyboard Harmony 

A study of melody harmonization and composition in the smaller 
forms involving diatonic and chromatic chords as they apply to 
improvisation at the piano keyboard. Prerequisite, Music 7, 8, 23, 
24. 

TTh6 

53, 54. Composition, Form and Analysis 

Study of practical composition involving harmonic and contrapuntal 

materials in small and large forms with analysis of standard works 

179 



Music 

from folk and art song literature, chorales, piano and symphonic 
works. Special emphasis on complete analysis of works studied by 
the student for performance. Prerequisite, Music 7, 8, 23, 24, 31, 32. 
TThS2 

II 

Musical Culture 

2. Music Appreciation 

Open to all students desiring an understanding of music as an element 
of liberal culture and who wish to equip themselves for more intelli- 
gent appreciation and listening. The study of design and style, form, 
aural analysis, recognition of instruments and themes from the 
master works. Also integration of music study with the other fine 
arts and with historical progress. A survey of significant examples 
of the several types of musical compositions will be made through 
phonograph recordings. 
M WF6 

25, 26. American Music 

English origins in the seventeenth century. America's first compos- 
ers. National songs, Lowell Mason, Stephen Foster. Music of the 
Civil War. Folk music — its use by American composers. The newer 
developments in orchestral and choral music. Contemporary com- 
posers. Illustrative recordings. 
M W F 3 

27, 28. Opera 

A survey of the development of the opera from its earliest form to the 

present. Representative works will be studied through the use of 

recordings. 

M W F 3 {Alternates with Music 25, 26) 

29, 30. Hymnology 

Early church hymnody. Latin and Greek contributions. The ref- 
ormation chorale. English Psalmody and the English Hymn during 
the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. A study of the great hymns 
and hymn tunes of the church including twentieth century hymns. 
Designed especially for ministerial students. 
M WF2 



180 



Music 

33, 34. Music History 

A course designed to interest musical amateurs and students of music 
literature. A survey of the history, literature and meaning of music, 
aiming to stimulate an intelligent attitude toward the hearing and 
understanding of music and its social uses. Illustrative recordings. 
M W F7 

III 

* Methods 

17, 18. Voice Methods 

Survey of technic and repertoire materials with demonstration of 
their application and interpretation. Breath preparation and control, 
phonation, interpretation, and program building. Stage deport- 
ment as applied to the recital, oratorio, and music-drama fields. 
Organization and direction of vocal arts projects for studio, church 
school and community. Enrollment limited to students with adequate 
private voice instruction background. Twice weekly with assigned 
laboratory preparation. 

Hours to be arranged Credit, 1 hour each semester 

39. Conducting and Score Reading 

Principles of chorus, band and orchestra conducting as they apply to 
school and community performance. Technique of the baton. 
Practical study of problems of choral and instrumental conducting. 
Prerequisite, Music 5, 6, 7, 8. 
M W F 4; Fait semester only 

Education 40. Teaching of Music 

The teaching and supervision of music in the public schools. The 
place of music in the cultural education of the adolescent, its relation 
to community life. Materials in choral and instrumental music. 
Methods and plans of organization. Prerequisite Music 7, 8. 
M W F 4 {Spring semester only) 

Education 41. Band and Orchestra Methods 

The development of Public School Instrumental Music; the selection 

and care of instruments; study of materials and methods; problems 

* Each course in this division may count as either Music or Education, *but~choice 
must be indicated at time of registration. 

181 



Music 

of interest and discipline; the development of routine; administrative 
methods and problems. Prerequisite, Music 7, 8. 

Hours to be arranged Credit, 3 hours 



IV 

*Ensemble 

9, 10. Orchestra 

The study and performance of works from the classical and modern 
repertory. Appearance in public concerts. 

T 5:00 p.m., Th 7:15 p.m. Credit, 1 hour each semester 

11, 12. Choir 

The study and performance of sacred and secular choral literature. 
This organization forms the chapel choir. A selected group forms 
the traveling choir for out of town concerts. 

T Th 4:00 p.m. Credit, 1 hour each semester 

13, 14. Band 

The study and performance of the standard band repertoire and 
appearances in several campus and public performances. The 
Marching Band performs at home and at several out of town football 
games and parades. 

M W F 4:00 p.m. Concert Band Credit, 1 hour each semester 

T T 4:00 p.m. Varsity Band Credit, 1 hour each semester 



V 

Applied Music 

Applied Music courses are open to all college students 
with the approval of the instructor. The following 
descriptions are suggested performance levels for the 
four years of study in the principle fields of concentra- 
tion. 



* No student may register for more than one hour of Ensemble credit each semester. 
Not more than eight hours Ensemble credit will be counted toward graduation. 

182 



Music 

Lesson and Practice Schedule 
Students enrolled in any Applied Music course will 
note the following schedule of weekly lessons and practice : 

One lesson with minimum of five hours practice. 

Credit, 1 hour each semester 
One lesson with minimum of ten hours practice. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester 

Note: All examinations in Applied Music courses will be given 
by the Music Department faculty serving as a group and grades 
will be determined by this group. 



Piano 

7,2 

Major and minor scales, dominant seventh and diminished seventh 
technic in root position and all inversions, quarter note at M.M. 
84-88. Bach, Two Part Inventions; Mozart, Sonata K280; Beethoven, 
Sonata Op. 14, No. 1 or 2. Short Romantic and Contemporary 
compositions of the difficulty of the Chopin A-flat Prelude; technic 
studies as deemed necessary by the teacher. 

3,4 

Major and minor scales, dominant seventh and diminished seventh 
technic continued, quarter note at M.M. 100. Bach, Three Part 
Inventions; Beethoven, Sonata in C minor, Op. 10; Mozart, Fantasy 
in D minor; Chopin, Etude, Op. 10, No. 9; technic studies as deemed 
necessary by the teacher. 

21,22 

Major and minor scales in 3rds, 6ths, lOths, quarter note at M.M. 
92-96. Bach, Well Tempered Clavier or French Suites; Beethoven, 
Op. 27, No. 1, or Op. 78; Chopin, Etude Op. 25, No. 4; technic 
studies as deemed necessary by the teacher. 

23,24 

Major and minor scales quarter note at M.M. 120-132 and in 3rds, 
6ths, lOths, quarter note at M.M. 100-108. Bach, Well Tempered 
Clavier or English Suites; Beethoven, Op. 31, No. 2, or Op. 90; 
Brahms, Intermezzo Op. 117, No. 2; Chopin Etude Op. 10, No. 3; 
technic studies as deemed necessary by the teacher. 

183 



Music 



Organ 

Manual and pedal technique; clarity in contrapuntal playing; 
Bach's Eight Little Preludes and Fugues; hymn playing. 

3,4 

Pedal scales; smaller Preludes and Fugues of Bach; Chorale Preludes; 

simpler works of more modern composers; hymn playing. 

21, 22 

More difficult Bach Preludes and Fugues and Chorale Preludes; 
selected works by Mendelssohn, Franck, etc. 

23, 24 

Larger Preludes and Fugues of Bach; Trio Sonatas; selected modern 
composers of all Schools; Widor, Vierne, Dupre, etc. 

Voice 
7,2 

Establishment of correct breath and pronunciation habits through 
complementing physical and phonetic exercises. Clarity of diction, 
pitch poise, legato singing and consistent reference to mezzo voce 
stressed. Early Italian, folk and folk-like songs in English. 

3,4 

Vocalises to induce more facility in the medium range. Studies in 
messa di voce, portamenti, and grupetti stressed. Repertoire to include 
moderately difficult arias of the Classic school and early Romantic 
art songs. Participation in student recitals. 

21, 22 

Extended scales and arpeggi. Execution of vocal fiortura. Elimination 
of registers and an even-timbered quality throughout the range 
stressed. More difficult Classic arias, moderately difficult songs and 
arias of the Romantic school in original language. Participation 
in student recitals, oratorio and music-drama. 

23, 24 

Attention to the development of individual style; selection and 
interpretation of repertoire best suited to the student's particular 
expression bent. More difficult songs and arias of all schools in 
original language. Senior Recital. 

184 



Music 





Orchestral and Band Instruments 




Flute 


1-24 


Trumpet 1-24 


Violin 


1-24 


Oboe 


1-24 


French Horn 1-24 


Viola 


1-24 


Clarinet 


1-24 


Trombone 1-24 


Cello 


1-24 


Bassoon 


1-24 


Euphonium 1 -24 


Double Bass 


1-24 


Saxophone 


1-24 


Tuba 1-24 


Percussion 


1-24 



Studies of progressive difficulty covering tone production, scales, 
and technical studies, all articulations or bowings, embellishments, 
phrasing, etudes, solo and small ensemble repertoire, excerpts from 
band and orchestral literature and applied transpositions. 



Secondary Courses 

Piano 7a-4a 

All major and minor scales and I, IV and V7 chords and inver- 
sions. Improvisation of simple harmonizations of familiar songs. 
Sight-reading of community songs and hymns. Transposition of 
melodies with simple harmonic accompaniments. Study of appro- 
priate standard piano literature. 

37, 38. Literature of the Piano 

A survey course designed to acquaint students with some of the teach- 
ing materials of the piano. Several large works from the standard 
repertoire will be studied in detail during the second semester. 

Th 6 Credit, 1 hour each semester 

43, 44. Brass Instruments Class 

The fundamentals of playing and teaching all members of the Brass 
family. Twice weekly with a minimum of five hours practice. 

Hours to be arranged Credit, 1 hour each semester 

45, 46. String Instruments Class 

The fundamentals of playing and teaching all members of the String 
family. Twice weekly with a minimum of five hours practice. 

Hours to be arranged Credit, 1 hour each semester 

47, 48. Woodwind Instruments Class 

The fundamentals of playing and teaching all members of the Wood- 
wind family. Twice weekly with a minimum of five hours practice. 
Hours to be arranged Credit, 1 hour each semester 

185 



Philosophy 

49, 50. Percussion Instruments Class 

The fundamentals of playing and teaching all members of the 
Percussion family. Twice weekly with a minimum of five hours prac- 
tice. 

Hours to be arranged Credit, 1 hour each semester 

51, 52. Semi-Private Voice Class 

Classes will consist of at least four students each. Offered to qualified 
students interested in making a study of voice class materials, or, as 
preparation for the private voice courses. Minimum of five hours 
practice. 

Hours to be arranged Credit, 1 hour each semester 

Applied Music Fees 

Students enrolled for individual or class study in 

applied music as offered above will note the following 

schedule of semester fees, in addition to tuition, payable 

to the Treasurer not later than November 1 and March 

1, respectively. 

One lesson per week in piano or organ $72.00 

One lesson per week in voice 60.00 

One lesson per week in orchestral or band instruments . . . 60.00 
Class instruction in voice, or band and orchestra instru- 
ments, per student (minimum total for any one class, 

4 students) 30.00 

Practice studio (with piano) rental per semester (one hour 

daily) 6.00 

Practice studio (with piano) rental per semester (two hours 

daily) 10.00 

Organ practice per semester (one hour daily) 10.00 

Organ practice per semester (two hours daily) 14.00 

Other instrument rental per semester 5.00 

Philosophy 
Professor Reid 
Associate Professor Helm 
Instructors Murphy, Roebuck 
The Spilman Philosophy Seminar, open to advanced 
students in Philosophy, was established in 1934 by an 

186 



Philosophy 

endowment, in perpetuity for the department, of $4,000 
by Dr. Bernard W. Spilman. The income from the 
endowment is used to provide books for the seminar 
library which now contains about 3,400 volumes. In 
1960, friends of the department established the A. G. 
Reid Philosophy Fund. The annual income from this 
endowment is used to support the departmental library 
and to provide lectures on the "Relation of Philosophy 
to Christian Faith." The furniture of the department 
was donated in honor of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Hough 
by their children. 

A major in this department requires 24 credit hours, 
including Philosophy 23, 31, 32, 39, 41. 

22. Introductory Philosophy 

A course designed to introduce to the student the major systems of 
philosophy, from the early Greeks to the medieval period. Required 
of all candidates for the degrees of bachelor of arts and bachelor of 
science. Junior standing normally required; second semester sopho- 
mores admitted by departmental permission only. 
MW F 1, 2, 3, 6; TThS 1,2 

23. Modern Philosophy 

A course designed to introduce the student to the major systems of 
modern philosophy, from the sixteenth through the nineteenth 
centuries. 

M WF2 

26, 27. Readings in Philosophy 

Approximately fifteen great books, in or closely related to philosophy, 
will be read each semester. Prerequisite, Philosophy 22 and special 
permission. 
M WF4 

31, 32. Seminar: Ancient and Modern Philosophy 

A careful examination of ancient and modern types of philosophy. 
Prerequisite, Philosophy 22 and 23 and special permission. 

T Th 1-2 Credit, 3 hours each semester 

187 



Philosophy 

33, 34. Seminar: Epistemology 

A comprehensive survey of philosophical conceptions of knowledge. 
Prerequisite, Philosophy 22 and 23, and senior standing. 

T Th 6-7 Credit, 3 hours each semester 

35, 36. Plato and Aristotle 

Plato's dialogues and sections of Aristotle's works. Prerequisite, 
Philosophy 22. 
TTh4 

37, 38. Hegel and Spinoza 

Extensive readings and reports. Prerequisite, Philosophy 22. 
T Th6 

39. Philosophy of Religion 

A critical consideration of the philosophical aspects of religious 
thought. Prerequisite, Philosophy 22. 
M WF4 

41 . Logic 

An elementary study of the laws of valid inference, recognition of 
fallacies, and logical analysis. Prerequisite, Philosophy 22. 
M W F3 

43. Ethics 

A critical study of the fundamental problems of morals. Readings 
in the ethical works of Western philosophers. Prerequisite, Philosophy 
22. 

MWF7 

45. Medieval Philosophy 

An examination of the philosophy of the Middle Ages, concentrating 
especially on the thought of Christian Scholastics, involving also a 
study of the works of Moslem and Jewish scholars of the period. 
Prerequisite, Philosophy 22. 
Three hours to be arranged 

Al . Contemporary Philosophy 

A study of systems of philosophical thought of the twentieth century, 
with emphasis upon their origins and distinctive characteristics. 
Prerequisite, Philosophy 22. 
M W F6 

188 



Physical Education 



Physical Education 

Professor Barrow 
Associate Professor Dodson 
Assistant Professors Crisp, Hooks 
Instructors Casey, Ellison, Jordan, Ogden, 
Stallings 

The purpose of the Department of Physical Educa- 
tion is to organize, administer and supervise the follow- 
ing programs: (1) Required Physical Education 
Program consisting of conditioning activities, varied 
team and individual sports, special corrective and 
remedial instruction to all students with physical prob- 
lems according to the individual's need, and to teach a 
few basic fundamentals of hygienic living which must 
be observed to maintain a state of health and physical 
fitness. (2) Intramural Sports Program which al- 
lows all students to participate and specialize in varied 
individual and team sports which will be of lifelong 
benefit. (3) Supervised Recreation Program con- 
sisting of varied recreational and leisure time activities. 
(4) Professional Curriculum Program which will 
offer the necessary training for those interested in the 
fields of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and 
Athletic Coaching. 

I 
Required Physical Education 

Physical Education 1 and 2 are required of all fresh- 
men and transfer students who have not complied with 
this requirement. For those men enrolled in ROTC, 
Physical Education 1 and 2 requirement may be post- 
poned until the sophomore year but must be completed 
by the end of that second year of attendance in Wake 

189 



Physical Education 



Forest College. Not more than four hours of required or 
elective physical education may be counted toward graduation 

1-2. Physical Education 

A basic course consisting of body mechanics, basic health and physio- 
logical principles, aquatics, team sports, rhythmic activities, and 
individual and dual sports designed to develop fundamental skills. 
Students' needs and interests will be met by allowing controlled 
election of selected activities based upon the results of a standardized 
proficiency examination and/or previous experiences. 

Credit, 1 hour each semester 
1-2. Physical Education {Special) 

A course consisting of remedial instruction or non-activity units of 
study for students with special problems, handicaps or medical 
excuses. 

Hours to be arranged Credit, 1 hour each semester 

II 

Elective Physical Education 

For those students who wish to specialize in sports 
activities beyond the requirement, a varied sports 
program is offered. Any two of the courses listed below 
may be elected for credit toward graduation. Prerequi- 
site, Physical Education 1, 2. 

Hours to be arranged Credit, 1 hour each 

9. Golf; Handball 15. Beginning and Intermediate 

10. Badminton; Tennis Swimming 

1 1 . Creative Rhythms 1 6. Advanced Swimming 

13. Gymnastics; Tumbling 17. Creative Dance 

14. Archery; Golf 18. Life Saving; Water Sports 

19. Weight Training and Con- 
ditioning 

III 

Courses for Major Students 

Students desiring to elect a major in Health and Physi- 
cal Education and to satisfy the State requirements for 

190 



Physical Education 



a teaching certificate must be of Junior standing, and 
will be required to have the following courses: Biology 
1, 2; three (3) hours in Physiology of Exercise; and three 
(3) hours in Human Anatomy. In addition to the above 
required foundation sciences a minimum of 29 hours is 
required in Health and Physical Education as follows: 
7, 8, 31, 32, 34, 41, 42, 45, 48 and a minimum of five 
courses in five different areas of the following applied 
technique courses: 30, 33, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, and 40. 
Courses 35 and 38 are classified as one area. 

7, 8. Physical Education 

Required courses for major students in Physical Education consisting 
of various physical education activities which are essential to a well 
rounded program. 

Hours to be arranged Credit, 1 hour each semester 

21. Human Anatomy 

A course designed to meet the needs of students in Physical Education 
in which the basic principles of human anatomy are a requisite for 
a working knowledge of the human body. 
T ThS2 

22. Physiology of Exercise 

This course presents the many effects of muscular activity on the 
processes of the body which constitutes the scientific basis of Physical 
Education. 
M WF 1 

30. Methods and Materials in Tumbling, Stunts, and 

Gymnastics 
Offered spring 1 959 and alternate years. Credit, 2 hours 

31. Principles of Physical Education and Recreation 

A general introductory course and orientation to Health, Physical 
Education and Recreation and its relation to general education and 
the present organization of society. 
M WF 1 

191 



Physical Education 



32. Organization and Administration of Health and Physical 

Education 

A course in problems and procedures in Health and Physical Edu- 
cation and the administration of an interscholastic athletic program. 
M W F 3 

33. Methods and Materials in Group Games of Low Organi- 

zation 
M W F4 Credit, 2 hours 

34. First Aid — Safety — Athletic Injuries 

A course in safety education and prevention of accidents with 
practical application of first aid and treatment of minor athletic 
injuries. 

TThS2 

35. Theory of Coaching Baseball and Basketball 

Credit, 2 hours 



36. Individual Sports 

37. Team Sports 

38. Theory of Coaching Football and Track 

39. Aquatics 

40. Methods and Materials in Dance 



Credit, 2 hours 
Credit, 2 hours 
Credit, 2 hours 
Credit, 2 hours 
Credit, 2 hours 



41. Individual Physical Education 

A course in body mechanics and kinesiology dealing with a program 
for all handicapped and special problems in Health and Physical 
Education. 
TThS 1 



192 



Physics 

42. Problems in Health Education 

This course presents methods and materials for the teaching of 

health and the current research in the field. 

M WF2 

44. Organization and Administration of Recreation 

A course in recreational problems and the administration of the 
several types of recreation. 
MWF3 

45. Teaching of Health and Physical Education * 

A course for students in the field of Health and Physical Education 
where emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of teaching, laws of 
learning and other essentials. 
M WF2 

48. Evaluation and Measurement in Health and Physical 

Education 
A course in measurement techniques to determine pupil status in 
established standards of Health and Physical Education which 
reflect the prevailing educational philosophy. 

T Th 1 Credit, 2 hours 

49. Recreation Leadership 

This course emphasizes the various theoretical and practical aspects 
of leadership in various types of recreation. 
M WF 3 

Physics 
Professor Turner 
Assistant Professors Brehme, Shields, Williams 

In addition to the courses prescribed by the College, 
the requirements for a B.S. degree with a major in 
Physics are 32 hours of physics which must include 
courses 11, 12, 26, 28, 33, 34 and 37, Chemistry 1-12 
and Mathematics through differential equations. 

* Required Education course in major field counting toward Education requirement. 

193 

13 



Physics 

The following is a suggested schedule for Physics 
Majors. Electives must be chosen in consultation with 
the major adviser. Military Science may be taken in 
addition to the courses listed. 



Freshmen Year 




Sophomore Year 






Physics 


1,2 


Physics 


11, 


12 


*Mathematics 


5, 11 


Mathematics 


12, 


13 


English 


1,2 


Chemistry 


1, 


12 


History 


1,2 


English 


3, 


4 


*Language 


1,2 


Language 


3, 


4 


Physical Education 


1,2 








Junior Year 




Senior Year 






Physics 


26,28 


Physics 


33, 


34 


Math 


31,38 


* * *Physics 


24, 


27 


Religion 


1,2 


Philosophy 


11 




Political Science 


11, 12 


Physics 


37 




or Business 




Electives 






Administration 


3,4 









1,2. General Physics * * * * 

A basic course for freshman and sophomores including, the elements 
of mechanics, properties of matter, wave motion, sound heat, elec- 
tricity and magnetism, light and some of the recent developments 
in Physics. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. 

Credit, 4 hours each semester 

1 1 . Mechanics 

The fundamental principles of statics of particles and rigid bodies, 
conservation of energy, conservation of momentum, elasticity, 
damped harmonic motion, temperature and heat with an intro- 
duction to the laws of thermodynamics. Corequisite, Math. 1 1 . 

M W F 4 Credit, 4 hours 

12. Electricity and Optics 

Fundamentals of electrostatics, potentials, and fields; introduction 
to D.C. and A.C. circuit theory and measurement: fundamentals 



* Students may be required to elect Math 6 before Math 11. 

** German preferred, French allowed. 

•** Electives. 

**** Upperclassmen may elect this course but will be given additional assignments. 



194 



Physics 

of electro-magnetic wave propagation and interaction with matter. 

Corequisite, Math 12. Prerequisite, Physics 11. 

M W F 2 Credit, 4 hours 

20. Descriptive Astronomy 

An introductory study of the universe from the solar system to the 
galaxies, with discussions of the celestial sphere and celestial navi- 
gation. Several class meetings will be scheduled in the evening for 
purposes of observation. Credit, 3 hours 

24. Electronics 

Elements of electron theory including a study of electrons in vacuum 
tubes and semi-conduction devices. An analysis is made of basic 
circuits including amplifiers, oscillators, scalers, and those circuits 
used in basic research. Prerequisite, Physics 12. 

Credit, 4 hours 

26. Thermodynamics 

A treatment of temperature measurements, elementary kinetic 
theory, transfer of heat, laws of thermodynamics, change of state, 
with applications to the problems of physics and chemistry. Pre- 
requisites, Physics 2 and Math 12. Credit, 3 hours 

27. Physical Optics 

A study of reflection and refraction, lenses and mirrors, optical in- 
struments, electromagnetic waves, interference and diffraction 
phenomena, polarized light, and interaction of light with matter. 
Prerequisite, Physics 2. Credit, 4 hours 

28. Atomic Physics 

An elementary treatment of electron theory, atomic structure, dual 
nature of light, electromagnetic spectrum, X-rays, spectroscopy, 
radioactivity, nuclear particles, and cosmic rays. Prerequisite, 
Physics 2. Credit, 3 hours 

30. Contemporary Physics 

Selected topics in Nuclear Physics, solid state physics and fields of 
current interest. Registration by permission of the instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours 
33. Classical Mechanics 

Selected topics in dynamics including the motion of a system of par- 
ticles, rigid bodies, and a particle under the action of a central force. 

195 



Political Science 



This course also includes a study of accelerated reference systems, 
LaGrange and Hamilton equations, vibrating systems, normal co- 
ordinates, vibrating strings and wave motion. Prerequisites, Physics 
11, Math 38. Credit, 3 hours 

34. Electromagnetic Theory 

A study of the basic equations of electromagnetism with emphasis 
on the meaning and application of Maxwell's equations. Prerequisite, 
Physics 12, Math 38. Credit, 3 hours 

37. Advanced Laboratory 

Experimental work of an advanced nature on topics in heat and 
thermodynamics, mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics; plus an 
investigation performed individually under the personal direction 
of a member of the staff on a current research project in the depart- 
ment. Open only to senior physics majors. Credit, 3 hours 

38. Research 

Library, conference, and laboratory work performed on an individual 
basis. Open only to students with a superior record. Six hours a week. 
Prerequisite, permission of the staff. Credit, 2 hours 



Political Science 

Professor Richards 

Associate Professor Jumper 

Assistant Professors J. E. Anderson, Gregg 

The major in Political Science is 30 hours and must 
include Political Science 11 and 12. The remaining 24 
hours in the major and 18 hours of required work in 
related fields are selected by the student and the Political 
Science adviser. Political Science 11 is prerequisite for 
all other courses in the field except Political Science 15 
and 16. Students of demonstrated ability, however, 
may be admitted to advanced courses with the written 
approval of their major adviser and the instructor con- 
cerned. 



196 



Political Science 



I 

American Government 

11 5 12. Government and Politics in the United States 

A survey course in the origins and characteristics of American political 
institutions at the national, state, and local levels and the problems 
and policies of American government in the areas of public finance, 
regulation of business, agriculture, labor, social welfare, national 
defense, and foreign affairs. 

Any student who, in the opinion of the Department of Political 
Science, shows adequate proficiency in American government may 
be permitted to substitute Political Science 13, 14, 23, 27, or 35 for 
Political Science 12. Credit, 3 hours each semester 



23. American Political Parties 

A study of the organization and functions of parties and pressure 
groups in American politics, methods of nominating candidates for 
public office, problems of American suffrage, campaign techniques, 
and the administration of elections. Credit, 3 hours 

25, 26. American Constitutional Law 

A study of the American constitutional system as interpreted and 
developed through judical interpretation. The first semester is de- 
voted to a consideration of the Supreme Court as an institution of 
government, its structure and function in the American political 
process, and court decisions affecting the three branches of the na- 
tional government and the nature of the federal system. The second 
semester is devoted to a study of decisions affecting civil rights, with 
special emphasis on such topics as freedom of speech, press, religion, 
and assembly; substantive due process of law; equal protection of 
the laws; and procedural rights granted the criminally accused. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester 

30. Public Administration 

An introductory study of the place of administration in the govern- 
mental process with special emphasis on the concepts of administra- 
tive organization, methods of administrative control, personnel and 
fiscal management. Current problems and developments are stressed. 
This course may count as Political Science or Business Administra- 

197 



Political Science 



tion, but not both. At the time of registration the student must de- 
termine in which field credit is desired. Credit, 3 hours 

33. Government and the Economy 

An examination of the role of government in the American economy. 
Primary attention will be given to historical, legal, and political 
aspects of government policies in regard to monopoly, agriculture, 
and labor. Selected problems in other areas of interest will also be 
considered. Credit, 3 hours 

35. Problems in State and Local Government 

An advanced course in which selected problems of state, county, 
municipal, and metropolitan governments are given intensive con- 
sideration. Special emphasis will be given to the state of North Caro- 
lina and its political subdivisions. Credit, 3 hours 

36. The Legislative Function and Policy Formation 

A survey of the legislative function in government. Topics considered 
include the theory of representative government; legislative structure, 
organization, and procedure; party organization and influence in 
legislative bodies; the influence of pressure groups and lobbying in 
the legislative process; relationships between legislatures and other 
branches of government. Current issues and problems are stressed. 

Credit, 3 hours 

II 

Comparative Government 

13. Comparative Government: Great Britain and France 

A comparative study of the governments and political culture of 
Great Britain and France. Credit, 3 hours 

14. Comparative Government: The Soviet Union and Germany 
A comparative study of the governments and political culture of 
L ^e Soviet Union and Germany. Credit, 3 hours 

15. 16. Introduction to Indian Political Cidture 

This course may count as Political Science or History, but not both. 
At the time of registration the student must determine in which field 
credit is desired. See History 15, 16. Credit, 3 hours each semester 

198 



Political Science 



21. Introduction to the Political Culture of China and Japan 

Attention will be given in this course to the development of the 
political thought and political institutions of East Asia with primary 
emphasis on China and Japan. While principal consideration will be 
given to the modern period, considerable time will be devoted to 
the traditional background. Credit, 3 hours 

22. Introduction to the Political Culture of Southeast Asia 

Attention will be given in this Course to the development of the 
political thought and political institutions of the various countries 
of Southeast Asia, with primary focus on Viet Nam, Burma, Thailand, 
Indonesia, and the Philippines. While the main emphasis will be on 
the modern period, considerable time will be devoted to the tradi- 
tional background. Credit, 3 hours 

33, 34. Modern India 

This course may count as Political Science or History, but not both 
At the time of registration the student must determine in which field 
credit is desired. See History 33, 34. Credit, 3 hours each semester 



III 

International Politics 

27. International Relations: Principles and Organization 

A study of the techniques and policies utilized by nations in their re- 
lations with each other. Special consideration is given to the concept 
of power politics, the role of international law and organization, and 
the patterns of diplomatic practice. Credit, 3 hours 

28. International Relations: Current Problems 

A study devoted to causes behind, national attitudes toward, and 
attempted solutions of selected problems in the current international 
scene. Consideration will be given to such subjects as disarmament, 
controls for outer space, the underdeveloped areas, and national 
self-determination. Credit, 3 hours 

29. The United Nations 

A study of the United Nations, its historical antecedents in inter- 
national organization, its structure, and its functions. Special con- 
sideration is devoted to bloc politics, to the performance of the United 
Nations in selected crises, and to its continuing activity in non- 
political or functional areas. Credit, 3 hours 

199 



Psychology 

IV 

Political Theory 

31. Political Theory: Ancient Greece through the Eighteenth 

Century 

A study devoted to the reading and discussion of selected writers in 
political theory from ancient Greece to the French Revolution. 
Special attention is given to Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, 
Locke, Rousseau, and Burke. Credit, 3 hours 

32. Political Theory: Nineteenth and Twentieth Century 

A study devoted to the reading and discussion of selected writers in 
modern political thought. Special consideration will be given to 
Mill, Hegel, Marx, Engels, Lenin, and the theorists of Democratic 
Socialism and the Welfare State. Credit, 3 hours 



V 

Research 

41, 42. Research in Political Science 

An advanced course devoted to extensive reading and research in 
the field of Political Science. Admission to the course is by permission 
of the Department only. On the average, class meetings will be held 
three hours each week. Credit, 3 hours each semester 



Psychology 

Professors Williams, Dashiell 
Assistant Professors Beck, Hills 

The department presents Psychology as one of the 
life sciences, since the basic subject matter and point 
of view are biological, and also as one of the behavioral 
sciences, with applications of psychological methods to 
human-social fields. Psychology 11 is prerequisite for 

200 



Psychology 

all other courses. A student majoring in the department 
will be expected to complete 30 hours of work, including 
courses numbered 21-22, 27 or 28 or 47 or 48, 25 or 37 
or 38, 32 or 35 or 40, and 50. 

11. Introductory Psychology 

A systematic survey of Psychology as a natural science. Sophomore 
standing required. Three hours lecture-demonstration. Prerequisite 
to all other courses in Psychology. Credit, 3 hours 

21, 22. Introduction to Experimental and Quantitative 

Methods. 

An introduction to classical and contemporary problems in psy- 
chological research, general methods and techniques used in their 
solution, elementary psychological statistics and their applications. 
Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory. Credit, 4 hours each semester 

25. Developmental Psychology 

A survey of the human life span from neonatal stages through old 
age. The behavior changes resulting from maturation and aging 
interacting with learning will be studied factually. Children and older 
subjects to be studied by experiment and measurement. Two hours 
lecture, two hours laboratory. Credit, 3 hours 

27. Comparative Psychology 

A survey of the evolution of behavior and essential morphology from 
protozoa to primates. Experimentation on simple (reflex) and com- 
plex (learning) functions of the white rat and other available forms. 
Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Credit, 3 hours 

28. Physiological Psychology 

Integrative and reactive (neural and chemical) functions of the 
human body as they involve structures in the receptive, the reactive, 
and the central phases of action, emotion, and thought. Two hours 
lecture, two hours laboratory. Credit, 3 hours 

32. Psychology of Adjustment 

Analysis of the principles by which habits and patterns of adjust- 
ment are learned and maintained, particularly as these principles 
have application to the emotional and social adjustment of the normal 

201 



Psychology 



individual. Intended primarily for students not majoring in Psy- 
chology. Not to be taken by one who has taken Psychology 35. Three 
hours lecture. Credit, 3 hours 

35. Abnormal Psychology 

Descriptive analyses of the major mental disorders with a canvassing 
of attempts at interpretation, and major types of therapy. Some 
observation of concrete cases will be attempted. Three hours lecture. 
Enrollment upon consent of instructor. Credit, 3 hours 

36. Psychology of Business and Industry 

Psychological principles and methods applied to problems commonly 
encountered in business and industry. Three hours lecture. 

Credit, 3 hours 

37. Personality Theory and Research 

An introduction to classical and contemporary theories of personality 
and a comparative evaluation of major theories in terms of relevant 
research studies. The journal literature is used to introduce the stu- 
dent to research problems and methodology in this area. Three 
hours lecture. Credit, 3 hours 

38. Social Psychology 

Interest will be centered on investigative methods in main areas, 
such as socialization of the individual, group dynamics, individual 
differences, attitude and opinion measurement. Two hours lecture, 
two hours laboratory. Credit, 3 hours 

40. Psychological Appraisal 

An introduction to the theory and techniques of psychological ap- 
praisal with particular emphasis on psychological tests. The course 
includes the demonstration of various appraisal techniques but is 
not intended to train the student as a practitioner. Two hours lec- 
ture, two hours laboratory. Credit, 3 hours 

43. Psychological Statistics 

Since the statistical procedures are applicable to either populational 
or experimental data, this course may count as either Psychology or 
Sociology, but not both. At the time of registration the student must 
determine in which field credit is desired. Not to be taken by one 
who has taken Psychology 21-22. One who takes this course may 
not receive credit in Bus. Ad. 37, Math 35, or Sociology 43. Two 
hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Credit, 3 hours 

202 



Religion 



45, 46. Original Problems 

Research problems to be attacked experimentally or statistically by 
students majoring in the department. Emphasis is placed on inde- 
pendent work with only guidance from the instructor. Either or 
both courses may be elected. Four hours laboratory. Prerequisites: 
Psychology 21-22, consent of instructor. Credit, 2 hoars each semester 

47, 48. Advanced Theory and Method 

Two courses to be offered at an advanced level, emphasizing current 
problems that are being attacked experimentally and theoretically. 
The journal literature will furnish an important source of material 
for group discussion, in seminar fashion. I. Sensation and Perception. 
II. Learning and Motivation. During any given year only one of the 
courses will be offered. Prerequisites: psychology 21, 22. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester 

50. History and Systems of Psychology 

After noting some psychological concepts in ancient and early modern 
thinking, this course places major emphasis upon nineteenth and 
twentieth century developments in Germany, France, Britain, Russia, 
and America. For senior majors, and others upon consent of the 
instructor. Three hours lecture. Credit, 3 hours 



Religion 

Professors Easley, Griffin, Herring 

Associate Professors Angell, Bryan, Dyer, E. 

W. Hamrick 
Assistant Professor Via 

The Department of Religion offers courses of instruc- 
tion designed to give every student entering Wake Forest 
an opportunity to acquire at least an introduction to 
the life, literature and the most important movements 
in the field of religion. It also seeks to give to students 
preparing for specialized service, as religious education 
directors, ministers, and missionaries, the foundational 
courses needed for further study. 

203 



Religion 

Six hours in Religion are required for all degrees. 
These may be taken from the offerings of the depart- 
ment in the Biblical field as follows: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 22, 25, 
26, 31, 33, 35. 

A major in Religion requires 30 credit hours — 12 
hours in Biblical studies and 18 hours from other offer- 
ings of the Department of Religion. At least half of the 
30 hours must be in courses numbered 20 or above. 

A major in Religious Education requires 30 credit 
hours — 12 hours in Biblical studies and 18 hours selected 
from the following: Religion 40, 43, 44, 45, 47, 48, 56, 
72, 77; Music 29, 30. 

Pre-seminary students are advised to include in their 
program of study, in addition to courses in Religion, 
courses in Philosophy, Ancient History, Public Speaking, 
and two languages, Greek or Latin, and German or 
French. 

Consult Summer Session Bulletin for courses offered 
only in the Summer Session. 

I 

Basic Courses 

1. Introduction to the Old Testament 

A survey of the Old Testament designed to introduce the student to 
the history, literature and religion of the ancient Hebrews. 

Credit, 3 hours 

2. Introduction to the New Testament 

A survey of the environment, literature and thought of the New 
Testament intended to introduce the student to the significance of 
the ministry of Jesus and the origins of the Christian Church. Pre- 
requisite, Religion 1. Credit, 3 hours 

3. The Hebrew Prophets 

A study of the background, personal characteristics, function, mes- 
sage, contribution, and present significance of the Hebrew prophets. 
Prerequisite, Religion 1 . Credit, 3 hours 

204 



Religion 



5. The Life and Teachings of Jesus 

A study of the life and teachings of Jesus as they are presented in 
the Gospels; purpose, to acquaint the student with the environment, 
personality, work and message of the historical Jesus. Not open to 
students who have credit for a New Testament survey course. Pre- 
requisite, Religion 1 . Credit, 3 hours 

6. The Life and Teachings of Paul 

A survey of the life and teachings of Paul as they are given in Acts 
and in the Epistles; special consideration to Paul's contribution to 
the expansion and the literature of Christianity. Not open to students 
who have credit for a New Testament survey course. Prerequisite, 
Religion 1 . Credit, 3 hours 

7. The Bible Through the Ages 

A study of the beginnings, development, and transmission of the 
Bible with special attention to the formation of the canon and the 
history of Biblical translation. Prerequisite, Religion 1 . Credit, 3 hours 



II 

Additional Biblical Studies 

22. Introduction to Biblical Archaeology 

A survey of the contributions of Near Eastern archaeology to Biblical 
studies. Prerequisite, Religion 1. 
M WF7 

25. The Narrative Literature of the Old Testament 

A study of the narrative books of the Old Testament from Genesis 
through Esther, with special emphasis upon the historical develop- 
ment of the literature and the religious purpose of the authors. Pre- 
requisite, Religion 1. 
T ThS2 

26. The Poetic Literature of the Old Testament 

A study of Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Song of Solomon, Lamentations, 
with some attention to scattered poems in other Old Testament 
books. Prerequisite, Religion 1. 
TThS2 

205 



Religion 

31. An Introduction to New Testament Thought 

A consideration of the major developing themes of the New Testa- 
ment as they are seen to grow out of the proclamation of the earliest 
church. Prerequisite, Religion I. 
MWF2 

32. Johannine Literature 

A thorough consideration of the Gospel of John, First John, and 
Revelation. Prerequisite, Religion 1 and 2 or 4. 
M WF2 

35. New Testament Literature 

A study of the books of the New Testament with special emphasis 
upon the purpose, religious teachings, and general content of each 
book. Prerequisite, Religion 2 or 4. 
M W F 1 

37. Major Epistles of Paul 

A thorough consideration of two of Paul's major epistles to be chosen 
from the following: Romans, 1 Corinthians, 2 Corinthians, Galatians, 
and Colossians. Prerequisite, Religion 1 and 2 or 4. 
M W F 2 

III 

Christian Ethics 

33. Biblical Ethics 

The development of ethical monotheism in the Torah and prophetic 
writings, its fulfillment in the love ethic of Jesus, and its application 
in the Early Church under the guidance of Paul. 
M W F4 

36. Christianity and Society 

An exposition of the ethical teachings of Jesus relating to society; 
special attention to the application of Christian principles to the 
social problems of the Southeastern States. 
T Th 6-7 

38. Church and Community 

An examination of the basic needs and trends of the contemporary 
community, especially the rural and suburban, in the light of the 

206 



Religion 

Christian norms for "the good community" (koinonia) ; the strategy 
of the church in constructive community relations. 
T Th 6-7 

IV 
Religious Education 

40. Theory of Religious Education 

A study of the nature and meaning of religious education with 
emphasis upon the basic foundations in religion and education. 
Attention is given to various viewpoints about learning; to objectives; 
to a consideration of curriculum. 
M WF3 

43. Administration of Religious Education 

The aim of this course is to prepare students for practical leadership 
in the educational work of the churches. Emphasis is laid upon the 
church school and other auxiliary agencies, through which the 
churches carry on their program of education, and upon practical 
methods of organizing and administering such a program. 
M W F2 

44. Teaching of Religion: Methods and Materials 

A study of the principles and purposes of method and of the use of 
methods and materials in the field of religious education especially 
as it is related to the work within the local church and community. 
This course may be credited as Education for those who are ap- 
plicants for a state teacher's certificate in religious education. 
T Th 7-8 

45. Psychology of Religion 

An examination of the psychological elements in the origin, develop- 
ment, and expression of religious experience. Informal lectures and 
class discussions on assigned readings. 
TThS2 

47. The Religious Education of Children 

Designed as an introduction to the study of child development and 
its significance for the home and church in regard to religious edu- 
cation. The course deals specifically with age groups from the nursery 
through juniors. 
M WF7 



207 



Religion 

48. The Religious Education of Young People and Adults 

A study of growth and development from adolescence through 
adulthood, with emphasis on the role of home and church as re- 
ligious educators. 
M WF7 

V 

Church Administration 

54. Life and Work of the Minister 

A study of the Christian ministry designed to help the student pre- 
pare himself for this calling. Pastoral dudes, ministerial ethics, and 
other related functions will be studied. 
M WF 3 

56. Worship 

A study of programs, source materials, and leadership in public 
worship designed to meet the needs of pastors and ministers of edu- 
cation. 

M W F4 

VI 

Historical and Doctrinal Studies 

71. World Religions 

The place of religion in life and the origin, nature, and accomplish- 
ments of the living religions of the world, studied from the historical 
point of view. 
T Th 4-5 

72. The History of Christianity 

A rapid survey of the history of the Christian Church with particular 
attention to Baptist policy and principles and the missionary move- 
ment of the last two centuries. 
T Th 4-5 

75. The Development of Christian Doctrine 
A study of the history of Christian thought, beginning with its He- 
braic and Greek backgrounds and tracing its rise and development 
to modern times. 
TThS2 



208 



Sociology 

76. Contemporary Christian Thought 

An examination of the types of contemporary Christian theology, 
such as Protestant Orthodoxy, Thomism, Liberalism, Modernism, 
and Neo-Orthodoxy. 
TThS2 

11. Biblical Doctrines 

A systematic study of the principal doctrines of Christianity as they 
are found in the Bible, such as Revelation, God, the Trinity, the 
Incarnation, Man, Sin, and Salvation. 

M WF3 

78. Man in Christian Theology and Modern Literature 

A study of the nature and predicament of man as seen in the Bible 
and contemporary theology as over against conflicting views of man 
implied in selected works of modern fiction. 
M WF2 

Sociology 

Professor Patrick 
Associate Professor Banks* 
Assistant Professors Amis, Chee 
Instructor Pace 
Lecturer McDowell 

The requirement for a major in Sociology is 30 hours. 
Students who choose Sociology to meet the basic course 
requirements will take Sociology 11 and any course 
numbered in the 20's or 30's, except 34. 

Consult Summer Session Bulletin for courses offered 
only in the Summer Session. 

1 1 . Principles of Sociology 

A general introduction to the field of Sociology: social origins; culture; 
human nature; collective behavior; communities; social institutions; 
social change. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. Credit, 3 hours 

* Absent on leave, 1960-61. 

209 

14 



Sociology 

23. Industrial Sociology 

A study stressing the relationship between industry and society, 
industry and the community, work groups and work relations, the 
role of the worker in work groups, and the social organization within 
industry. Prerequisite, Sociology 1 1 . Credit, 3 hours 

24. Personal Adjustment in Industry 

A socio-psychological study of the worker in an industrial civiliza- 
tion; emphasizing social attitudes, industrial morale, leadership, 
training, and the influence of the work group on the laborer; special 
emphasis also is given to the importance of testing, guidance, and 
counseling. Prerequisite, Sociology 1 1 . Credit, 3 hours 

25. Cultural Anthropology 

An introduction to the scientific study of culture using materials 
and concepts derived from the study of prehistoric and primitive 
cultures. The field of physical anthropology is surveyed and students 
are given an opportunity to do field and laboratory work in arche- 
ology. Credit, 3 hours 

26. Race and Culture 

A study of racial and ethnic groups from a cultural point of view. 
A number of inter-racial areas of the world are analyzed with 
especial reference to Hawaii, Brazil, South Africa, and the United 
States. Prerequisite, Sociology 11. Credit, 3 hours 

27. Public Opinion and Propaganda 

The nature and development of public opinion; its relation to atti- 
tude, biases, stereotypes and controversial issues. The place of com- 
munication in formal and informal means of control; role of leaders, 
pressure groups and minority groups; propaganda and censorship; 
use of radio, press, motion picture and graphic arts; and measure- 
ment of public opinion. Prerequisite, Sociology 11. Credit, 3 hours 

28. Culture and Personality 

A study of the relations between the individual and his society, 
including the influence of culture in shaping personalities and the 
part the individual plays in carrying on or changing his culture. 
Prerequisite, Sociology 1 1 . Credit, 3 hours 

29. Social Deviation and Disorganization 

A study of the theoretical approaches to some of the principal social 
and personal problems in contemporary society. Primary emphasis 

210 



Sociology 

will be given to the relationship between social structure and social 
problems. Prerequisite, Sociology 11. Credit, 3 hours 

30. Sociology of Child Development 

A study of the process of socialization in the light of contemporary 
behavioral science; the primary factors in personality development; 
the relations between personality and social structure. Prerequisite, 
Sociology 1 1 . Credit, 3 hours 

31. Criminology 

A study of crime from the point of view of its nature, causes, personal 
and social consequences, and methods of treatment and prevention. 
Prerequisite, Sociology 1 1 . Credit, 3 hours 

32. The Community 

A survey of materials relating to the community as a unit of socio- 
logical investigation. The structure and functioning of folk, rural and 
urban communities will be studied in order to bring out the general 
principles that apply to this form of social organization. Prerequisite, 
Sociology 1 1 . Credit, 3 hours 

33. Peoples of the World 

A survey of representative cultures from the major culture areas of 
the world, chosen to illustrate the basic principles of ethnology and 
to acquaint the student with the facts of cultural diversity. Prerequi- 
site, Sociology 11. Credit, 3 hours 

34. Introduction to Social Work 

This is a pre-professional course which is designed to introduce the 
student to social work and its various fields. This course carries 
3 hours credit with field work, 2 hours without field work. Prere- 
quisite Sociology 1 1 and permission of the instructor. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours 

38. Oriental Social and Cultural Systems 

This course is designed primarily to develop in the student a knowl- 
edge and an understanding of the basic social and cultural systems 
of the orient. Major emphasis will be given to the study of the process 
of socialization and social institutions. The influence of current 
cultural contacts with the West and consequent changes in the tra- 
ditional social institutions will be discussed. Prerequisite, Sociology 11. 

Credit, 3 hours 

211 



Speech 

43. Social Statistics 

This course is designed primarily for the first year of statistics for 
students in Sociology and related fields. It will deal with research 
designs, the collection, tabulation, charting, analysis, and summariza- 
tion of data. Emphasis will be upon the application rather than the 
theory of statistical methods. This course may count as either Soci- 
ology or Psychology, but not both. At the time of registration the 
student must determine in which field credit is desired. One who 
takes this course may not receive credit in Bus. Adm. 37, Math 35 or 
Psychology 43. Credit, 3 hours 

46. Contemporary Social Theory 

A systematic study of the major writings in the development of 
modern sociological thought. The sociological theories of recent 
writers will be critically examined with a view to laying the founda- 
tions for the student's own constructive theory of social life. Pre- 
requisite, Sociology 1 1 . Credit, 3 hours 

47. Social Research 

A survey of the field of sociological research. Practice in the methods 
of developing studies and analyzing sociological data is emphasized. 
Prerequisite, Sociology 1 1 , senior standing, and permission of the 
instructor. Credit, 3 hours 

48. Marriage and the Family 

A study of the social basis and importance of the family, with especial 
reference to the influence of social change on family life and the 
problems growing out of modern conditions. Credit, 3 hours 

49. 50. Seminar 

A reading and research seminar for majors in Sociology. Students 
will normally register for 49 in their junior year and 50 in their 
senior year. Credit, 1 hour each semester 



Speech 

Associate Professor Shirley 
Assistant Professor Burroughs 
Instructor Walton 

The major in Speech consists of 30 credit hours 
which must include courses 13, 41, 54, 55, 56, and 57. 

212 



Speech 

The Speech adviser will recommend the remaining 12 
hours from courses that conform to the individual's 
needs. Each Speech major is strongly urged to elect 
courses in the Social Sciences, Psychology, Philosophy, 
and Literature. 

13. Speech Fundamentals 

A study of the nature and fundamentals of Speech (voice, body 
action, spoken language, and mental activity). Practice in the prep- 
aration and delivery of short speeches; foundation work for advanced 
speech study; use of tape recorder. 
M WF 2,3,4,6; TTS4 

14. Public Speaking 

The preparation and presentation of short speeches to inform, con- 
vince, actuate, and entertain with special emphasis on organization 
and language. Experience in selecting, classifying, and recording ma- 
terials; practice in effective delivery; use of tape recorder. Prerequi- 
site, Speech 13. 
MWF4 

41. Introduction to Broadcasting 

A study of the development and structure of radio and television 
broadcasting in the United States with special attention to pro- 
gramming and current problems in broadcasting. Laboratory work 
in radio and television announcing. 
M W F 6 

42. Radio and Television Production 

A study of the fundamentals of writing and directing radio and tele- 
vision programs with laboratory work in producing dramas, docu- 
mentaries, educational programs, and special events programs. 
M W F 6 

5 1 . History of the Theater 

A survey of the development of theater from its earliest beginnings to 
the present. Emphasis will be placed on Greek, Roman, French, 
Italian, English, and American theater. Prerequisite, Junior standing. 
M W F7 

213 



Speech 

52. Theories of Acting 

A study of the acting theories of the important actors and theater 
theorists from Aristotle through Judith Anderson. Attention will be 
given to acting techniques, practice in applying the various principles 
involved in creating a characterization, and director-actor relation- 
ships. Prerequisite, Junior standing. Credit, 3 hours 
T Th 6-7 

54. Public Discussion and Debate 

Emphasis upon theory, principles, and practice of debate and dis- 
cussion. Classroom practice in debate, open forum, committee meet- 
ings, panels, and other types of discussion. Practice in techniques of 
research, analysis, organization, and delivery relating to contro- 
versies pertinent to our day. 
M W F 7 

55. Voice and Diction 

A study of the principles of voice production with consideration to 
the elimination of throat fatigue, huskiness, nasality, extremes of 
pitch, indistinctness, monotony, and mispronunciation. Emphasis 
placed on phonetics as the basis for correct sound formation. Students 
voices are recorded. 
M W F 2 

56. Oral Interpretation of Literature 

The development of adequate mental and emotional responsiveness 
to literature and the ability to communicate this appreciation to 
others by oral reading. Various types of literature used for study and 
practice: the short story, old ballad, narrative poem, lyric, sonnet, and 
essay. 

M W F 2 

57. Play Directing 

A study of the theory and practice of play directing in the modern 
theater with emphasis on the educational theater; training in selecting 
and analyzing scripts; experience in casting and conducting rehearsals 
from the point of view of the director; participation in laboratory and 
College Theater productions. 

T Th 6-7 Credit, 3 hours 

58. Stagecraft 

A study of the visual elements of play production: the theory of stage 
design; color and line; the building and painting of scenery; the mak- 

214 



Asian Studies 



ing of stage models; costuming and make-up; stage lighting, prop- 
erties, and stage effects. Practical experience gained in laboratory 
and College Theater productions. 

T Th 6-7 Credit, 3 hours 

60. Forms of Address 

The composition and delivery of social, ceremonial, professional, 
policy forming, and legislative addresses; emphasis placed on struc- 
ture, support, and style; attention given to effective delivery; study 
of classical and current speech texts; critical observations of speakers 
outside the class; use of recording machine. Prerequisite, Speech 13 
or permission of instructor. 
M W F 6 

63. American Public Address 

The history and criticism of American public address through the 
study of speeches of significant statesmen, lawyers, and clergymen 
from colonial times to the present; emphasis on sources of effective- 
ness. 

M W F7 

64. Speech Correction 

An introductory study of principles and methods of speech correction. 
Emphasis upon functional and pathological disorders with some 
attention to problems of delayed speech, audiology, and sound sub- 
stitutions. Observations and clinical practice will be provided. 

T Th 4-5 Credit, 3 hours 

The Asian Studies Program 

As a result of a grant from the Mary Reynolds Bab- 
cock Foundation, an Asian studies program was inaugu- 
rated in the fall of 1960 at Wake Forest College, Salem 
College, and Winston-Salem Teachers College. The 
director of the program is Professor B. G. Gokhale, and 
the following courses are available in the Wake Forest 
College curriculum: 
History 15, 16. Introduction to Indian Political Culture 

(Not offered, 1961-62) 
History 17, 18. History and Civilization of Southeast Asia 
History 33, 34. Modern India 
Hindi 1,2. Elementary Hindi 

215 



Asian Studies 



Other related courses are offered in the departments 
of political science and sociology: 

Political Science 21. Introduction to the Political Culture 
of China and Japan (Professor Jumper) 

Political Science 22. Introduction to the Political Culture 
of Southeast Asia (Professor Jumper) 

Sociology 38. Oriental Social and Cultural Systems 

(Professor Chee) 

A description of each of these courses may be found 
in the curriculum of the department concerned. 



216 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

* Faculty 

Harold Wayland Tribble, President 
Gaines M. Rogers, Dean and Professor of Finance 
Fleta Joyce Bateman, Instructor in Secretarial Studies 
Leon P. Cook, Associate Professor of Accounting 
Ralph C. Heath, Professor of Marketing 
George Hobart, Visiting Professor of Economics 
Delmer P. Hylton, Professor of Accounting 
Oscar J. Lewis, Associate Professor of Accounting 
Jeanne Owen, Associate Professor of Business Law 
Charles M. Ramsey, Professor of Economics 
Karl Myron Scott, Professor of Management 
Lyell J. Thomas, Associate Professor of Economics 

Aims 

The School of Business Administration was conceived 
by the Administration and Trustees of Wake Forest Col- 
lege to provide a liberal education and at the same time 
the training essential for a career in business. With the 
constant growth in the industrialization of the region 
and the increase in the complexity of modern business, it 
is felt that professional training for men of business be- 
comes ever more essential. The future business leader, 
as indeed the present, must be an individual with the 
professional outlook, an individual of strength, culture, 
and character. Therefore, it is believed that the School 
of Business Administration operating in conjunction 
with a Liberal Arts College, and with a background of 
Christianity, represents the ideal combination in the 
preparation for a career in business. 



* See Administration and Faculty Sections for full information . 

217 



Business Administration 



Admission 

For admission to the School of Business Administration 
a student should present 64 hours and 64 quality points. 
In no case will a student be admitted without a minimum 
of 54 hours and 54 quality points. In so far as possible 
the courses outlined under the basic requirements for 
the B.B.A. degree should be taken during the first two 
years. 

Accreditation 

The School of Business Administration is a Member 
of the American Association of Collegiate Schools of 
Business. 

Organizations 

Two professional fraternities in business administra- 
tion and commerce have installed chapters at Wake 
Forest. The Gamma Nu Chapter of Delta Sigma Pi 
and the Gamma Delta Chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi 
were granted charters in 1950. A local business sorority 
for women students, Delta Kappa Nu, was organized 
in 1953. 

Awards 

For a description of the following awards see pages 
1 04-6 : Laura Baker Paden Medal, North Carolina Association of 
Certified Public Accountants Medal, A. M. Pullen and 
Company Medal, Wall Street Journal Award, Alpha Kappa 
Psi Scholarship Key, Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key, Delta 
Kappa Nu's Business Woman Student Award. 

Dean's List Certificates are awarded to graduating 
seniors receiving the B.B.A. degree who have appeared 
on the Dean's List for two of the four semesters prior 
to graduation. 

218 



Business Administration 



Degrees 

The School of Business Administration offers the 
Bachelor of Business Administration degree and a 
major in Economics or Commercial Education for 
those taking the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

The Bachelor of Business Administration degree re- 
quires one hundred twenty-eight hours of college work. 
A minimum of fifty-seven hours of prescribed work in 
Business Administration must be taken. At least 128 
quality points must be presented for graduation by those 
who take all of their work here, 64 by those who enter 
from other colleges. In no case may a student present 
hours in excess of quality points. Each student seeking 
the B.B.A. degree must take a minimum of nine hours 
beyond the principles level in non-required work in one 
area of concentration. 
Courses required of all candidates for the B.B.A. degree: 

Basic Requirements 

Sociology 11-23 

or 
Psychology 11-36 
English 1-2; 3-4 Political Science 11-12 

History 1-2 Philosophy 22 

Mathematics 2, 3 or 5, and 23 Business Administration 213-214 
*Religion, 6 hours Business Administration 101-102 

Science, 8 hours Choice of 6 hours: 

(Laboratory science) *Language through 3-4 or 

Physical Education 1, 2 Mathematics 24 and Speech 13 

Professional Work 
Business Administration 368 Business Administration 340 

Business Administration 321 Business Administration 331 

Business Administration 361-362 Business Administration 420 
Business Administration 350 Business Administration 460 

Students may obtain the Bachelor of Arts degree with 
a major in Economics or a major in Commercial Edu- 

• See page 114-15. 

219 



Business Administration 



cation. For a major in Economics forty-two hours are 
required in Economics and related fields with a mini- 
mum of thirty hours in Economics. Principles of Eco- 
nomics, Intermediate Economics, Money and Banking, 
Business Statistics, and either Comparative Economic 
Systems or History of Economic Thought must be 
included. For a major in Commercial Education the 
plan outlined under the General Commercial Certificate 
listed below should be followed. 



Teaching Certificates in Commerce 

I. General Commercial Certificate 

Students desiring a high school "A" certificate for 
general commercial work must complete the following 
courses in Business Administration: 

Business Administration 213 Business Administration 450 

Business Administration 214 Business Administration 451 

*Business Administration 250 **Business Administration 201 

Business Administration 101 Business Administration 340 

Business Administration 102 Business Administration 352 

Business Administration 251 Education 36 

*Business Administration 359 Business Administration 344 



II. Certification in Individual Areas 

Students may be certified in any one of the following 
individual fields upon completion of the prescribed 
courses: 

A. Typewriting (4 hours) C. Stenography (1 1 hours) 

Business Administration 250 Business Administration 250 (or 251) 
Business Administration 251 Business Administration 359, 450, 451 



• Students whose high school transcripts Bhow satisfactory completion of one year 
typing and one year shorthand may be excused from B.A. 250 and B.A. 359. 
•• Or one of the following: B.A. 331, B.A. 333 or B.A. 332. 

220 



Business Administration 



B. Accounting (15 hours) D. Basic Business (24 hours) 

Business Administration 101 Economics, 12; Accounting or 

Business Administration 102 Management, 12 

Business Administration 201 Business Administration 213, 214 

Business Administration 352 Business Administration 101, 102 

Business Administration 201 

3 additional hours in Accounting Business Administration 352 

or management 6 additional hours in Economics 



Fields of Concentration 

The courses listed below are classified into areas of 
concentration including both required and elective 
courses. Each student seeking the B.B.A. degree must 
take a minimum of nine hours beyond the principles 
level in non-required work in one area of concentration. 

Accounting 

The accounting curriculum is designed to give all 
candidates for degrees in Business Administration or 
Economics basic knowledge which is essential in under- 
standing and administering business operations. For 
those who elect more than the minimum required work, 
the curriculum makes available opportunity for training 
for the more responsible accounting positions in industry 
and government and also enables the student to prepare 
himself for the Certified Public Accountant examination. 

A major in accounting is offered to candidates for the 
B.B.A. degree. In order to qualify as an accounting 
major, the student must complete Business Administra- 
tion 101 and 102, 201 and 202, 203, 204, and 404, and 
three additional courses in accounting. A point-hour 
ratio of 1.75 to 1 must be attained in accounting sub- 
jects. Those who graduate as accounting majors are 
permitted to take the C.P.A. examination in North 

221 



Business Administration 



Carolina without qualifying experience which is other- 
wise necessary. (The point-hour ratio does not apply 
for C.P.A. examination purposes.) 

The senior accounting major may have the oppor- 
tunity to obtain practical accounting experience and 
training through the Accounting Internship Program. 

It is recommended that the student interested in a 
career in accounting begin his accounting studies during 
his freshman year in college. 

B.A. 101, 102 Principles of Accounting 6 

B.A. 201, 202 Intermediate Accounting 6 

B.A. 203 Cost Accounting 2 

B.A. 204 Advanced Cost Accounting 2 

B.A. 301 Governmental Accounting 3 

B.A. 302 Accounting Systems 3 

B.A. 401 Advanced Accounting Problems I 3 

B.A. 402 Advanced Accounting Problems II 3 

B.A. 403 Income Tax Accounting 5 

B.A. 404 Auditing 3 

B.A. 405 Accounting Internship 2 

B.A. 406 Current Accounting Theory 2 

Economics 

B.A. 210 Economic Geography 3 

B.A. 213, 214 Principles of Economics 6 

Intermediate Economics 3 

Economic History of U.S. 3 

Foreign Trade 3 

Business Cycles 3 

Principles of Transportation 3 

Public Finance 3 

Comparative Economic Systems 3 

History of Economic Thought 3 

Finance 

Money and Banking 3 

Investments 3 

Credits and Collections 3 

Income Tax Accounting 3 

Public Finance 3 

Corporation Finance 3 

222 



B.A. 


310 


B.A. 


312 


B.A. 


314 


B.A. 


316 


B.A. 


346 


B.A. 


411 


B.A. 


412 


B.A. 


414 


B.A. 


321 


B.A. 


326 


B.A. 


342 


B.A. 


403 


B.A. 


411 


B.A. 


420 



Business Administration 



Management and Industrial Relations 

B.A. 203 Cost Accounting 3 

B.A. 204 Advanced Cost Accounting 3 

B.A. 316 Business Cycles 3 

B.A. 331 Principles of Management 3 

B.A. 332 Production Management 3 

B.A. 333 Personnel Management 3 

B.A. 368 Business Statistics 3 

B.A. 431 Labor Legislation 3 

B.A. 432 Wage and Salary Administration 3 

B.A. 434 Labor Problems 3 



Marketing 

B.A. 340 Fundamentals of Marketing 3 

B.A. 341 Advanced Marketing 3 

B.A. 342 Credits and Collections 3 

B.A. 344 Retailing 3 

B.A. 346 Principles of Transportation 3 

B.A. 440 Marketing Management 3 

B.A. 442 Fundamentals of Selling 3 

B.A. 444 Marketing Research 3 



Secretarial Studies 

B.A. 250 Elementary Typewriting 2 

B.A. 251 Advanced Typewriting 2 

B.A. 350 Business Correspondence 3 

B.A. 352 Office Management 3 

B.A. 359 Elementary Shorthand 3 

B.A. 450 Advanced Shorthand 3 

B.A. 451 Advanced Transcription 3 

Ed. 36 Teaching of Business Education Subjects 3 



General Business Courses 

B.A. 360 Business Law 3 

B.A. 361 Business Law 3 

B.A. 364 Insurance 3 

B.A. 366 Real Estate 3 

B.A. 368 Business Statistics 3 

B.A. 460 Quantitative Analysis of Business Data 3 

223 



Accounting 



Public Administration 



B.A. 270 Public Administration 3 

B.A. 301 Governmental Accounting 3 

B.A. 331 Principles of Management 3 

B.A. 333 Personnel Management 3 

B.A. 352 Office Management 3 

B.A. 41 1 Public Finance 3 

B.A. 432 Wage and Salary Administration 3 
Pol. Sci. 11,12 National, State, and Local Government 3 

Pol. Sci. 33 Government and Business 3 



Description of Courses 

I 

Accounting 

101-102. Principles of Accounting 

The fundamental concepts of accounting, the accounting equation, 
the accounting cycle. Preparation of statements and working papers. 
Business Administration 101 is prerequisite to 102. Credit for B.A. 
101 is withheld until B.A. 102 has been satisfactorily completed. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester 

201-202. Intermediate Accounting 

A detailed analysis of problems and the related theory concerning 
accounts normally found in financial statements. Preparation of 
supplementary reports and statements designed for special purposes. 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 102; 201 is prerequisite for 202. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester 

203. Cost Accounting 

Theory and procedures used in accumulating product costs under 
job lot production. Allocation and proration of manufacturing 
costs is one of the major problems considered. Considerable atten- 
tion is given to the analysis and interpretation of information ac- 
cumulated through cost accounting procedures. Prerequisite: Business 
Administration 102. Credit, 3 hours 

204. Advanced Cost Accounting 

A continuation of B.A. 203 for continuous process production. Pre- 
determined cost procedures are studied with major emphasis placed 
on variance analysis. Prerequisite: Business Administration 203. 

Credit, 2 hours 

224 



Accounting 

301. Governmental Accounting 

The theory and technique in handling accounts for non-profit 
institutions, and the preparation of reports and statements, with 
special emphasis on state and local governmental units. Prerequisite: 
Business Administration 201 Credit, 3 hours 

302. Accounting Systems 

A study of the functions which must be performed by an adequate 
accounting system. Methods and procedures necessary to accomplish 
these functions are examined and related to selected typical organiza- 
tions. Prerequisites: Business Administration 201 and 203. 

Credit, 3 hours 

401. Advanced Accounting Problems — / 

Advanced problems designed as preparation for the student who 
intends to work for the G.P.A. certificate and for those who desire 
a more thorough background in accounting. Prerequisite: Business 
Administration 201. Credit, 3 hours 

402. Advanced Accounting Problems — II 

Advanced work in theory and practice of accounting designed to 
help prepare the student for the C.P.A. examination and to enable 
him to solve complex business problems. Prerequisite, Business 
Administration 201 Credit, 3 hours 

404. Auditing 

A course designed to familiarize the student with the work of the 
independent professional accountant, with particular emphasis upon 
examination and verification of books and records and financial 
statements taken therefrom. Prerequisites: Business Administration 
202 and 204. Credit, 3 hours 

405. Accounting Internship 

This course may be taken only in conjunction with B.A. 404. The 
student observes and participates in actual operations and submits 
detailed reports thereon of his activity with a selected firm of certified 
public accountants. Approval of the Dean of the School of Business 
Administration is necessary for enrollment in the course. No credit 
is granted until successful completion of B.A. 404 Credit, 2 hours 

225 
15 



Economics 

403. Income Tax Accounting 

Unusual treatment of certain accounts to comply with the Internal 
Revenue Code. Preparation of individual and corporate returns. 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 201. Credit, 5 hours 

406. Current Accounting Theory 

A study of current problems and controversies in accounting theory. 
Admission to the class is by permission of the instructor only. The 
class meets in seminar fashion for two hours one day each week. 

Credit, 2 hours 

II 

Economics 

210. Economic Geography 

A study of the climatic regions of the world and the economic ac- 
tivity of each region, with a view toward integrating these into the 
world economy. Offered in alternate years, beginning 1954-55. 

Credit, 3 hours 

213. Principles of Economics 

An introductory course with emphasis on micro-economic analysis. 
Basic economic concepts and theories of production, value and 
price, economics of the firm, and functional distribution are the 
principal topics considered. Throughout the course application of 
relevant principles in the analysis of specific economic problems is 
stressed. Credit, 3 hours 

214. Principles of Economics 

The emphasis in this course is on macro-economic analysis. Principal 
topics considered are national income concepts, national income 
analysis, money and banking, and problems of economic growth and 
economic instability. Throughout the course application of relevant 
principles in the analysis of specific economic problems is stressed. 
Prerequisite; Business Administration 213. Credit, 3 hours 

310. Intermediate Economics 

The analytical tools and principles of modern economics: theories of 
value and distribution, of money and prices, and of international 
trade; factors determining national income. Prerequisite: Business 
Administration 213, 214. Credit, 3 hours 

226 



Economics 

312. Economic History of the United States 

This course may count as Business Administration or History, but not 
both. At the time of registration the student must determine in which 
field credit is desired. See History 36. Credit, 3 hours 

314. Foreign Trade 

Principles underlying regional specialization, techniques of foreign 
exchange and lending, policies of the leading commercial nations 
and monetary and financial policies viewed against the background 
of international commercial agreements. Prerequisite: Business 
Administration 213, 214. Credit, 3 hours 

316. Business Cycles 

Studies of the causes of business cycles, statistical measures of various 
types of fluctuation in economic activity, business cycle history, and 
an examination of the various services used in forecasting. Prereq- 
uisite: Business Administration 213, 214, and 368 Credit, 3 hours 

346. Principles of Transportation 

An analysis of the economic, social, and political aspects of rail, water 
and air transportation. Prerequisite: Business Administration 213, 
214. Credit, 3 hours 

411. Public Finance 

A study of government expenditures, budgeting, the administration 
of the public debt and the ensuing effects upon the economy, public 
revenue with an examination of each of the main taxes, and inter- 
governmental financial relationships. Prerequisite: Business Ad- 
Administration 213, 214. Credit, 3 hours 

412. Comparative Economic Systems 

An objective examination of the theory, programs, and practices 
of the principal contemporary economic systems, including capital- 
ism, socialism, communism, fascism, and co-operation. Prerequisite: 
Business Administration 213, 214. Credit, 3 hours 

414. History of Economic Thought 

A survey of the main developments in economic thought from about 
1500 to the present. Prerequisite: Business Administration 213, 214. 

Credit, 3 hours 

227 



Management 



434. Labor Problems 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the trade union as an 
institution, management objectives, the bargaining process, the 
economics of wage determination, the handling of non-wage issues 
in collective bargaining, and the politico-economic impact of trade 
unions upon the development of the American economy. Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 213, 214. Credit, 3 hours 



III 

Finance 
321. Money and Banking 

A study of monetary systems, the banking structure, banking prob- 
lems and international finance. Prerequisite: Business Administration 
213,214. Credit, 3 hours 

326. Investments 

A study of the principles governing the proper investment of personal 
and institutional funds; information sources; exchanges and govern- 
ment regulations. Prerequisite: Business Administration 214, 101, 
and 102. Ciedit, 3 hours 

420. Corporation Finance 

A study of the principles and practices of corporate finance, types of 
securities and characteristics, problems of promotion and combina- 
tion, security placement, operating policies, receivership and reor- 
ganization, and government control. Prerequisite: Business Adminis- 
tration 214, 101, and 102 Credit, 3 hours 



IV 

Management and Industrial Relations 

331. Principles of Management 

A survey course designed to acquaint the student with the aspects 
of modern management. The background of the management move- 
ment, administrative policies, plant location, plant layout, product 
development and research, and personnel relations are among the 
topics covered. Prerequisite: Business Administration 213, and 214. 

Credit, 3 hours 

228 



Marketing 

332. Production Management 

Selected production problems are considered. Assembly-line tech- 
niques and quality control of materials will be covered. Prerequisite: 
Business Administration 213, 214 and 331. Credit, 3 hours 

333. Personnel Management 

A study of the principles and procedures involved in the recruitment 
and selection of a labor force, the handling of grievances, problems 
involved in collective bargaining, remuneration policies, merit 
rating, promotion and transfer, training in industry, and personnel 
records. Prerequisite: Business Administration 214. Credit, 3 hours 

431. Labor Legislation 

Labor problems are comprehensively treated with particular em- 
phasis upon their legal aspect; foundation of the labor movement, 
the social and political program they seek to carry through, the labor 
contract, social insurance legislation, and child labor laws are among 
the problems considered. Prerequisite: Business Administration 213, 
214. Credit, 3 hours 

432. Wage and Salary Administration 

A study of the different approaches that may be made to the problems 
involved in the creation of a sound wage and salary administration 
program in industry. Such problems as how to inaugurate, adminis- 
ter, and verify rated positions, and the impact of such programs on 
collective bargaining will be considered. Prerequisite: Business 
Administration 213, 214 and 333. Credit, 3 hours 

V 

Marketing 

340. Principles of Marketing 

An examination of the marketing structure within the framework 
of the dynamic economic system of the United States. Studies the 
movement of goods from producer to consumer through the various 
channels of distribution; the functions of marketing; marketing costs; 
the choice of policies; social and economic implications. 

Credit, 3 hours 

341. Advanced Marketing 

A course designed to further the student's knowledge of marketing 
principles and their application to the solution of distribution prob- 

229 



Marketing 

lems. Students do additional reading designed to increase their 
understanding of the field of marketing generally, and in particular 
of the marketing of industrial goods; wholesaling; purchasing; and 
marketing management. Prerequisite: Business Administration 340. 

Credit, 3 hours 

342. Credits and Collections 

A study of the credit problems of individual business firms. Examines 
the policies upon which good credit practice is built; sources of 
credit information; analysis of risk; collection procedures; credit 
department organization; significance of consumer and mercantile 
credit to the economy. Credit, 3 hours 

3AA. Retailing 

An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the 
basic problems of retailing. Business location, store layout, mer- 
chandise display, buying procedures, and inventory control are 
among the topics covered. Prerequisite: Business Administration 340. 

Credit, 3 hours 

440. Marketing Management 

A study, from the viewpoint of the marketing manager, of the selling 
policies of a business enterprise. Studies: merchandising, promotion, 
planning, organizing, and control. Examines the problems of product 
planning, developing product lines, pricing the product, determining 
the market, costs of selling, sales helps, brands, and the comparative 
emphasis to be placed upon types of selling activity. Prerequisite: 
Business Administration 340. Credit, 3 hours 

442. Fundamentals of Selling 

A study of the sales function in the marketing of goods and services. 
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals 
of both advertising and personal selling as an integral part of the 
marketing process. Prerequisite: Business Administration 340. 

Credit, 3 hours 

AAA. Marketing Research 

This course is designed to provide the student with a background in 
the nature, scope, and application of research as it may be used to 
support the sales function of an enterprise. Included in the study are: 
formulation of specific marketing problems; sources of data; pro- 
cedures and methods of analysis; interpretation and presentation of 
findings. Prerequisite: Business Administration 340 and 368. 

Credit, 3 hours 

230 



Secretarial Studies 



VI 

Secretarial Studies 

250. Elementary Typing 

A course in touch typewriting for personal use. Drills are used to 
develop facility, accuracy, and the complete mastery of the keyboard. 
Instruction in letter writing, centering problems, and manuscript 
typing. A speed of thirty words a minute is required for credit in 
this course. Students having completed one year of typing must 
receive permission from instructor to register for this course. 

Credit, 2 hours 

251. Advanced Typing 

A course designed for the development of typewriting skill with 
special attention to the mechanics of letter writing, tabulation, 
manuscript typing, legal documents, and business forms. 

Credit, 2 hours 

350. Business Correspondence 

A course in the theory and practical application of business writing 
principles, dealing concretely with salesmanship, collection, credit, 
et cetera, with particular reference to the types of expression best 
adapted to the problems of those fields. Prerequisite: typing ability. 

Credit, 3 hours 

352. Office Management 

A course designed to prepare students for meeting situations in the 
modern business office. The course includes an introduction to the 
use of dictation and transcribing machines and instruction in filing. 

Credit, 3 hours 

359. Elementary Shorthand 

In this course attention is given to developing reading and writing 
skills. A speed of sixty words a minute is required for credit. 

Credit, 3 hours 

450. Advanced Shorthand 

Dictation course. Intensive practice in reading and dictation, with 
emphasis on transcription. A speed of eighty words a minute is 
required for this course. Credit, 3 hours 

451. Advanced Transcription 

A dictation course. Intensive practice in transcription and office 
procedure. A speed of 100 words a minute is required for this course. 

Credit, 3 hours 

231 



Business Administration 



Education 36. Teaching of Business Education Subjects 

A course designed to familiarize the prospective high school business 
education teacher with the methods and materials used in the teach- 
ing of typewriting, shorthand, business arithmetic, bookkeeping, 
and general business. Prerequisite: Business Administration 213, 214, 
250, 101, 359. Credit, 3 hours 

VII 

General Business Courses 

361, 362. Business Law 

A study of the more important legal principles which govern in the 
daily conduct of business. Discussion of contracts, agency, negotiable 
instruments, sales, bailments, partnership, corporations, bankruptcy, 
and other topics. Credit, 3 hours each semester 

364. Insurance 

A study of the fundamental principles of insurance and their appli- 
cation to life, property, casualty, and social insurance. Prerequisite: 
Business Administration 213, 214 Credit, 3 hours 

366. Real Estate 

A study of the fundamental principles, laws, and practices relating 
to appraisal, ownership, control, financing, and transfer of resi- 
dential and other real property. Prerequisite: Business Administration 
213,214 Credit, 3 hours 

368. Business Statistics 

A study of statistical methods with emphasis upon business and 
economic data, including such techniques as collecting, classifying, 
tabulating, graphing, and combining data in frequency distributions; 
index numbers; time series; correlation; and preparation of reports. 
One taking this course may not receive credit in Math 35, Sociology 
43, or Psychology 43. Prerequisite: Sixty semester hours work. 

Credit, 3 hours 

460. Quantitative Analysis of Business Data 

This course, required of all B.B.A. degree candidates except those 
majoring in accounting, is designed to help the student use account- 
ing and related data in solving problems in business administration. 
The case method is employed to a considerable extent. Prerequisite: 
Business Administration 214 and 102 Credit, 3 hours 

232 



Public Administration 



VIII 

Public Administration 

270. Public Administration 

This course may count as Business Administration or Political 
Science, but not both. At the time of registration the student must 
determine in which field credit is desired. See Political Science 30. 

Credit, 3 hours 



233 



DIVISION OP GRADUATE STUDIES 

On January 13, 1961, the Trustees of Wake Forest 
College established the Division of Graduate Studies and 
announced that beginning in September, 1961, the 
College will resume course and research work leading to 
the degree of Master of Arts in the Departments of 
Biology, Chemistry, English, History, Mathematics, 
and Physics. Other departments are to be added as soon 
as circumstances permit. 

Requirements for admission to the Division of Gradu- 
ate Studies include graduation with a superior record 
from an accredited college. In the evaluation of tran- 
scripts special attention will be given to the applicant's 
record on work in the field of major interest. 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts will be 
required to complete successfully a minimum of twenty- 
four hours of course work, write a thesis for which six 
hours of credit will be granted, and pass a reading 
examination in one modern foreign language. 

The Division of Graduate Studies will have a total 
of thirty-four assistantships, fellowships and scholarships 
available to be awarded for the year 1961-62. 

A more detailed announcement concerning grants 
and a bulletin describing courses to be offered will be 
issued early in the spring semester of 1961. 

These publications and application-for-admission 
forms may be obtained by writing The Director of 
Graduate Studies, Box 7323, Reynolda Station, Wake 
Forest College, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



234 



SCHOOL OF LAW 

*Faculty 

Harold Wayland Tribble, President 

Carroll W. Weathers, Dean and Professor of Law 

Hugh William Divine, Professor of Law 

Esron MgGruder Faris, Jr., Associate Professor of Law 

Robert E. Lee, Professor of Law 

W. P. Sandridge, Lecturer in Law 

* *John Donald Scarlett, Associate Professor of Law 

Warren A. Seavey, Visiting Professor of Law 

James E. Sizemore, Professor of Law 

James A. Webster, Jr., Professor of Law 

Norman A. Wiggins, Associate Professor of Law 

Mrs. Vivian Lunsford Wilson, Law Librarian 

General Statement 

The Law School was established as a department of 
Wake Forest College in 1894, the first instructor being 
Professor N. Y. Gulley, who served as dean from 1905 
until his retirement from active administration in 1935. 
From the beginning, the school has steadily grown and 
developed until it now has a faculty of eight full-time 
teachers. 

The selection and treatment of the courses of study 
offered in the Law School, and the method of instruction 
employed are designed to afford comprehensive and 
thorough training in the broad field of legal education 
and to equip students to practice in any jurisdiction 
where the Anglo-American law system prevails. How- 
ever, one of the primary purposes of the Law School 
from the time of its establishment has been to train 



• See Administration and Faculty sections for full information. 
** On leave of absence, 1960-61. 



235 



Law 



young men and women for the practice of law in 
North Carolina. The achievement of these purposes 
necessitates, first, the requirement of adequate and 
appropriate preliminary education in order to assure 
an intellectual maturity and cultural background 
against which legal principles and problems can be 
understood in their social, economic and moral, as 
well as in their legal aspects; second, a comprehensive 
study of the theories and doctrines of the Anglo-Ameri- 
can system of law and their statutory modification. 

The Law School has as its objective, not only to 
train a student in legal principles and doctrines, but 
also to stimulate his reasoning powers, to prepare him 
to present legal propositions logically and analytically, 
and to develop in the student a profound sense of legal 
ethics, professional responsibility and the duty of the 
lawyer to society. 

The Law School is fully approved by all national and 
state accrediting agencies. It is a member of the As- 
sociation of American Law Schools, and is listed as an 
approved school by the American Bar Association, by 
the Board of Law Examiners and Council of the North 
Carolina State Bar, and by the University of the State 
of New York. 

The Law School has its separate building, new and 
modern in all respects and designed to accommodate 
the continued growth and future development of the 
School and the expansion of its program in the field of 
legal education. The law building, which is a handsome 
four-story structure, contains many attractive and useful 
features including air-conditioning. In addition to class- 
room and seminar room facilities, administrative and 
faculty offices, library, student lounge and faculty 
conference room, the building contains a combination 

236 



Law 



moot court-assembly room which will seat 250 people 
and is adapted for the multiple purposes of the moot 
court program, Student Bar Association activities, and 
institutes in the field of continuing legal education. The 
Law Library is of extraordinary beauty and will accom- 
modate in excess of 100,000 volumes. Alcoves in the 
reading room and balcony provide individual study 
space for students. Additional study tables are available 
in the reading room and in the three conference rooms. 
Typing carrells are located in the stack area. The law 
building also provides a conference room for members 
of the Bar who wish to use the facilities of the Library 
for research. 

The Law Library contains approximately 28,750 
volumes, carefully selected to avoid unnecessary dupli- 
cation and to insure the greatest possible usefulness. 

Admission Requirements 

The academic requirements for admission to the 
School of Law, as a candidate for the LL.B. degree, may 
be satisfied by any one of the following methods: 

(1) An academic degree from an approved college 
or university. 

(2) The completion of three years of academic work 
prescribed in the "Combined Course" in the College of 
Liberal Arts at Wake Forest College. (See pages 119-21 
for details.) 

(3) The completion of three years of academic work 
acceptable toward a bachelor's degree at an approved 
college or university. 

An entering law student without an academic degree 
must have completed at least three-fourths of the work 
acceptable for a bachelor's degree granted on the basis 

237 



Law 



of a four-year period of study in residence at such ap- 
proved college or university attended by him, with a 
scholastic average, based on all work undertaken, at 
least equal to the quality of work required for graduation 
at the institutions attended, and at least equal to C. All 
grades of failure must be included in the computation, 
including failures received in courses which have been 
re-taken and passed. 

Non-theory courses in military science, hygiene, 
domestic arts, physical education, vocal or instrumental 
music, practice teaching, teaching methods and tech- 
niques and similar courses are not acceptable under the 
above rule. "Required" non-theory work is acceptable 
up to ten per cent of the total credit offered for admission. 

The academic requirements set forth above are mini- 
mum requirements, and satisfaction of these require- 
ments do not necessarily entitle an applicant to ad- 
mission. In addition, an applicant for admission is 
required to take the Law School Admission Test (an 
aptitude test hereinafter referred to) and to have his 
score on such Test furnished this Law School. 

There is no rigidly prescribed pre-legal curriculum for 
admission to the School of Law. Since the law, in its 
application and as a subject of study, touches so many 
phases of life, it has been considered unwise to require 
an inflexible preparatory course. The School of Law 
merely recommends the inclusion of as many of the 
following courses as possible in any pre-law program of 
study: English Composition, History of the United 
States, History of England, European History, Con- 
stitutional History, Government of the United States, 
State and Local Government, Comparative Govern- 
ment, International Relations, Literature, Foreign Lan- 
guages, Speech, Psychology, Philosophy, Logic, Natural 

238 



Law 



Sciences, Mathematics, Principles of Economics, Ac- 
counting, and Investments. 

The work of a law student is greatly facilitated if he can 
use a typewriter. 

Application for admission to the School of Law must 
be made in writing on a form furnished by the Dean of 
the School of Law. A small photograph of the applicant 
must be attached to the application form upon its 
return. The applicant must request the Registrar of 
each college or university that he has attended to send 
a complete transcript of his record direct to the Dean 
of the School of Law. The applicant must also have his 
score on the Law School Admission Test reported to 
this Law School. When these items have been received 
by the School of Law, the applicant will be notified 
concerning his application. 

When an application has been accepted the applicant 
must make a deposit of $25 with the Treasurer of the 
College. The deposit is applied on tuition or College 
charges when the applicant enters the Law School. 

Beginning students are admitted to the School of Law 
at the opening of the fall session. In addition, for several 
years it has been the policy of the Law School to admit 
beginning students at the opening of the spring session, 
which enables such students by continuing without inter- 
ruption to complete the three-year course in two and one- 
half years consisting of five regular semesters and two 
summer sessions. The School will admit beginning stu- 
dents at the opening of the 1962 Spring Semester on 
January 30, 1962, and this policy of admitting beginning 
students at the opening of the spring session will continue 
until terminated by the Faculty. Advanced students 
may be admitted at the opening of the summer, fall or 
spring sessions. The Law School each year conducts 

239 



Law 



two semesters of 17 weeks each, and a summer session 
of nine weeks. 

Admission to Advanced Standing. A student from a law 
school which is a member of the Association of American 
Law Schools, who is otherwise qualified to enter this 
school, may in the discretion of the faculty be admitted to 
advanced standing for the LL.B. degree. The student 
must be eligible for readmission to the law school from 
which he proposes to transfer. The last year of work on 
the basis of which the degree is granted must be taken 
in the Wake Forest College School of Law. 

Admission as Special Students. Applicants, not less than 
twenty-five years of age, who are found by the faculty 
to be equipped by experience and training for the study 
of law may be admitted as special students but not as 
candidates for a degree. Special students are rarely 
admitted. 

Law School Admission Test 

This Law School requires all applicants for admission 
to take the Law School Admission Test, an aptitude test 
administered by Educational Testing Service. The 
applicant's score on the Test will be considered among 
other factors in passing on his application for admission 
to this Law School. 

Applicants should write Law School Admission Test, 
Educational Testing Service, 20 Nassau Street, Prince- 
ton, New Jersey, for application forms for taking the 
Test, and for the Bulletin of Information regarding the 
Test. The Test will be given at numerous locations 
throughout the nation, including Wake Forest College. 

An applicant should request Educational Testing 
Service to report his score on the Test to this Law School. 

240 



Law 



Scholarships and Student Aid 

The Law School has a number of scholarships avail- 
able for each beginning class. Some of these scholarships 
are awarded on the basis of character, scholarship and 
financial need. Additional scholarships in a larger 
amount and covering full tuition are available for each 
beginning class and are awarded on the basis of char- 
acter and exceptional scholastic achievement without 
regard to financial need. Application forms for scholar- 
ships may be obtained from the Dean of the School of 
Law. Applications for scholarships should be filed by 
April 1st for the school year commencing the following 
September. 

The College has available loan funds for the benefit of 
students who are in need of financial aid and have 
satisfactorily completed at least a full semester. 

In addition, a number of law students are afforded 
limited employment as Law Library assistants and 
dormitory counselors but usually after the completion 
of their first year. 

Degree of LL.B. 

The degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) will be 
awarded to the student who (1) has fulfilled the re- 
quirements for admission to the Law School as a regular 
student, (2) thereafter spends the equivalent of three 
academic years in resident study in the Law School, (3) 
successfully completes eighty-three semester hours of law, 
including all prescribed courses, and (4) attains a cumu- 
lative weighted average of 67 or more on all work 
required for graduation. 

A candidate for degree whose cumulative weighted 
average places him in the upper ten per cent of his 
graduating class will be graduated with the distinction 
cum laude and will be classified as a "Scholastic Honors 



241 
16 



Law 



Graduate." Any such person graduating with a cumu- 
lative weighted average of 85 or above will be graduated 
with the distinction magna cum laude. 

The Summer Session 

The School of Law operates a summer session of nine 
weeks, the work of which is carefully planned with 
reference to the curriculum of the regular academic year, 
and may be used either to supplement the regular curric- 
ulum or as a substitute for part of it. Courses are offered 
during the summer session for advanced students only. 

Further Information 

Descriptions of the system of grading and examina- 
tions, general scholastic regulations, student organiza- 
tions, prizes and awards, and the complete course of 
study are contained in a special Law School Bulletin, 
issued annually. Requests for this bulletin, and other 
correspondence concerning the Law School, should be 
addressed to The Dean, School of Law, Wake Forest 
College, 7206 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



242 



BOWMAN GRAY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

*Administrative Officers 

Harold Wayland Tribble, President 

Coy C. Carpenter, Dean 

Manson Meads, Executive Dean 

Donald M. Hayes, Assistant Dean 

Harry O. Parker, Controller 

Mrs. Benjamin S. Patrick, Jr., Registrar 

Origin and Development 

The School of Medicine was established at Wake 
Forest in 1902. It was renamed the School of Medical 
Sciences in 1937 and operated as a two-year medical 
school until 1941, when it was moved to Winston-Salem, 
North Carolina, as a four-year medical college with the 
name Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest 
College. 

The expansion and the enlargement programs were 
made possible August 3, 1939, when the resources 
of the Bowman Gray Foundation were awarded to 
Wake Forest College to be used exclusively for the 
medical school. It is now supported from the general 
budget of Wake Forest College, the resources of the 
Foundation, and other special funds. 

Equipment 

The North Carolina Baptist Hospital, having 450 
teaching beds, constitutes the main teaching hospital of 
the medical school. All buildings are located on the 
same campus and adjoin to form a single unit. The 
clinical and basic medical science departments are so 

* See Administration and Faculty sections. For the complete faculty roster, see the 
special bulletin of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine, which may be obtained by 
request to The Registrar, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North 
Carolina. 

243 



Medicine 

related physically and the faculty is so constituted that 
the teaching program is effectively correlated. 

Construction of a two-million-dollar wing has been 
completed and includes expanded facilities for additional 
research and laboratory areas, added space for the 
library, and additional classrooms. 

Standards 

The school is a member of the Association of Ameri- 
can Medical Colleges and is approved by the Liaison 
Committee of the Council on Medical Education of the 
American Medical Association and the Association of 
American Medical Colleges. Academic and professional 
standards comparable to other leading medical schools 
in the United States are maintained. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for entrance into the Medical 
School are based on the premise that the program of 
training a physician is a continuous one shared by both 
the undergraduate college and the medical school 
The responsibility of the undergraduate training pro- 
gram is thus not only to provide the prospective student 
with the technical information and skills which will 
make it possible for him to complete his course in 
medical school, but also to help him develop a broad 
background of experience and interest which will make 
it possible for him later to achieve a full realization of 
his potentialities as an individual and as a member of 
society. 

Although ninety semester hours are the minimum 
requirement, it is felt that, except in unusual circum- 
stances, the student should plan to complete a well- 
rounded four-year college course, comprising certain 

244 



Medicine 

specific requirements, but with the emphasis on a 
broad educational program. 

In order for the student entering medical school to 
be prepared for his courses, he must have acquired 
certain basic scientific information as listed below: 

(1) Physics: The equivalent of 8 semester hours in 
General Physics, including some knowledge of electricity, 
electromagnetic radiations, sound, heat, mechanics, and 
optics. 

(2) Chemistry: The student should know the chemical 
properties of the common chemical elements — light 
metals, halogens, oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur — and of the 
common organic compounds including those of the 
aliphatic, aromatic, and heterocyclic series. He should 
understand the simpler techniques of organic chem- 
istry and of volumetric quantitative analysis. He should 
be able to design simple experiments and be aware of the 
close dependence of results upon technique. He should 
be thoroughly familiar with ideas of dynamic equili- 
brium in terms of molecular, kinetic, and atomic 
theories and of the relationship of chemical properties 
to electronic structures of substances. This informa- 
tion is ordinarily covered in approximately 18-20 
semester hours, including general chemistry (two se- 
mesters), organic chemistry (two semesters), and volu- 
metric quantitative analysis (one semester), or the 
equivalent. 

(3) Biology: There is no single course which is con- 
sidered an absolute prerequisite for medical school. It 
is desirable, however, for the student to have had a 
broad survey of the animal kingdom — to have an aware- 
ness of animal types and their classifications and to see 
man as a part of the total biological picture. Such in- 
formation is ordinarily covered in an eight-semester- 

245 



Medicine 

hour course in general biology and one semester of ad- 
vanced zoology, such as comparative anatomy, em- 
bryology, genetics, cytology, etc. 

It should be emphasized that, in listing the above 
scientific requirements, it is not intended to minimize 
the importance of other less specific educational re- 
quirements. 

In addition to the material listed above, the student 
should acquire extensive knowledge of man as the 
product of his social, physical, and emotional en- 
vironment. The desired training is given in courses in 
Philosophy, Religion, Economics, Sociology, History, 
Literature, Mathematics, Language, and Psychology. 
The student is urged to acquaint himself as widely in 
these fields of knowledge as time and his inclination will 
permit. 

Admission to the 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

Candidates desiring admission will, upon request to 
the Committee on Admissions of the Medical School, 
be furnished application blanks, which should be prop- 
erly filled out and returned to the Registrar together 
with an application fee of five dollars. On receipt of 
the application and transcripts of the applicant's pre- 
medical work, the credentials will be reviewed by the 
Committee on Admissions. Students whose applications 
are favorably considered will be invited to come to 
Winston-Salem for personal interviews. Those ap- 
plicants who are accepted are required to make a 
deposit of fifty dollars to reserve a place in the class for 
which they are accepted. The deposit will be credited 
on tuition and deducted from the payment due when the 
student matriculates. 

Students are selected on the basis of academic per- 

246 



Medicine 

formance, character, and general fitness for the study of 
medicine. No student will be admitted who is ineligible, 
because of scholastic difficulties or misconduct, to 
re-enroll in a school previously attended. Students more 
than thirty years of age are seldom admitted. 

Graduate Division of the 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

The Division of Graduate Studies provides op- 
portunities for qualified students to obtain advanced 
instruction and research training in the basic medical 
sciences. Course work leading to the Master of Science 
degree with a major in Anatomy, Biochemistry, Physiol- 
ogy, Pharmacology, and Microbiology, is offered. The 
Department of Anatomy also provides instruction lead- 
ing to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

Further Information 

For detailed information concerning enrollment in 
the Bowman Gray School of Medicine, course of study 
in the graduate program, admission to advanced stand- 
ing, and other matters, address The Registrar, The 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, 
North Carolina. 



247 



EVENING CLASSES 

In September, 1957, Wake Forest College began a 
program of regular college classes meeting in the evening 
for the benefit of qualified persons whose occupations 
or other considerations prevented them from attending 
day classes. The evening classes are taught by members 
of the College faculty as part of their regular teaching 
loads and carry full college credit. This program follows 
the College calendar for the fall and spring semesters 
and consists of courses selected from the College catalog. 
There are no evening classes during the summer session. 

Except in the sciences, classes meet for 75 minutes on 
either Monday and Wednesday or Tuesday and Thurs- 
day evenings and carry three hours credit each semester. 
Science classes meet the same evenings for a longer 
period of time and carry four hours credit. The total 
cost for all courses is $18.50 per credit hour. 

The programs offered in previous years have included 
introductory courses for those beginning college work 
and specialized courses for those with advanced stand- 
ing. The offerings for 1961-62 will again include selected 
introductory courses as well as those at the intermediate 
and advanced levels. The Bulletin of Wake Forest College 
Evening Classes, 1961-62, containing full information, 
will be available in June, 1961, and may be secured by 
writing the Director of Admissions, Wake Forest College, 
7305 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



248 



THE 1961 SUMMER SESSION 

Two Six-week Terms 

The first of two six-week terms will begin with regis- 
tration on Monday, June 12, 1961; the second, on July 
24. This is a departure from the one nine-week term 
that has been operated for a good many years. 

Class work will be confined to the mornings, except 
for courses in swimming and choir which will come in 
the afternoons. Periods will be seventy-five minutes in 
length, and classes will meet daily. 

Courses in the sciences carry four semester hours 
credit each, and those in swimming and choir one 
semester hour each. All other courses carry three semester 
hours credit. The normal load for a student is six se- 
mester hours, and the maximum load is seven hours. 

Courses will be offered which are designed to meet 
the needs of incoming freshmen, transfers from other 
colleges, and public school teachers needing renewal of 
certificates other than the graduate certificate, in ad- 
dition to the regular Wake Forest students. There will 
be courses in Biology, Chemistry, Classical and Modern 
Languages, Education, English, History, Mathematics, 
Music, Philosophy, Psychology, Physics, Physical Edu- 
cation, Religion, Sociology, Speech, and Business. 

For Summer Session Bulletin and other information, 
address Dean of the Summer Session, Wake Forest Col- 
lege, Box 7293 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, 
North Carolina. 



249 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES AND DEGREES 

1960 

The Program 

Sunday, June 5 

3:00 p.m. Organ Recital in Wait Chapel — Paul Robinson, 

Organist 

4:30 to 6:00 p.m. Reception by President and Mrs. Tribble for 
Graduating Classes and their Visitors 

8:00 p.m. Baccalaureate Sermon — Dr. Douglas M. Branch, 
General Secretary-Treasurer, Baptist State Convention of 
North Carolina 

Monday, June 6 

8:30 a.m. The Senior Class Breakfast — given by the Alumni 
Association 

9:30 a.m. Law School Senior Class Breakfast 

10:00 a.m. Meeting of the Board of Trustees 

10:30 a.m. Senior Orations (for the Ward Medal) — Law Court 
Room 

Janet Margaret Binkley "The Academic Shell" 

John Alexander Alford "The Worth of Creation" 

Donal Owen Schoonmaker 

"Wake Forest, 1960: An Inventory" 
Richard Lee Burleson "The Defacement of Honor" 

Presentation of Awards and Honors: 

1 . From the School of Arts and Sciences 

The J. B. Currin Orator's Medal to George A. Parker 
The A. D. Ward Orator's Medal to Janet Margaret 
Binkley 

2. From the School of Business Administration 

North Carolina Certified Public Accounts Medal — 

Joseph R. Cumby 
The A. M. Pullen and Company Medal — Harold L. Collis 
Wall Street Journal Medal — Hugh E. Wallace 
Lura Baker Paden Medal— Robert Franklin Watson 
Scholarship Keys: Delta Sigma Pi and Alpha Kappa Psi 

- — Joseph R. Cumby 
Delta Kappa Nu: Business Woman of the Year — Frances 

Louise Baucom 

252 



Commencement Exercises 



3. From the School of Law 

Lawyers Title Insurance Corporation Award — 

Harrell Powell, Jr., James Norman Stephens 
American Commercial Bank Will Drafting Award — 

First Place: Richard Moore Warren 

Second Place (tie): Plato Collins Barwick, Jr., Charles 
Gilmore Furr, Robert Alden Jones 
Nathan Burkan Memorial Copyright Competition: 

Walter Eugene Johnston, III 

4. From the Bowman Gray School of Medicine 
Roche Award — James Norris Wilfert, Jr. 
Faculty Award — Fay Knickerbocker Myers 

Student Thesis Award in Psychiatry — Donald M. Larson 
Best Student Paper Award — Robert Parker Pulliam 
Pediatric Award — H. Bee Gatling 
Frederick R. Taylor History of Medicine Society Award — 

George Podgorny; Christine M. and Ralph deS. 

Siewers, III 
Senior Members of Alpha Omega Alpha (Medicine) 
Douglass Franklin Adams Gray Thomas Boyette 
William Howard Admirand Gary Benjamin Copeland 
Curtis LeRoy Bakken Hortense Bee Gatling 

George Curtis Barber Robert Ellsworth Jones, Jr. 

Fay Knickerbocker Myers 

5. From the Department of Military Science and Tatics: 
National Defense Transportation Association Medal — 

Cadet Colonel Kermit W. Smith 
Department of the Army Superior Cadet Ribbon Award 

— Cadet Colonel Kermit W. Smith 
Third Army ROTC Certificate of Meritorious Leadership 

Achievement — Cadet Major Jerry W. West 
United States Armor Association Award — Cadet Captain 

Harold W. Idol 
Armed Forces Chemical Association ROTC Award — 

Cadet Captain James C. Eagle, Jr. 

12:00 m. Alumni Luncheon 

3:00 p.m. Conferring of Degrees 

Address — Dr. Lam Chi-Fung, President Hong Kong Baptist 

College 
The Message to the Graduates — President Harold W. Tribble 



253 



Degrees Conferred 



DEGREES CONFERRED 

Doctor of Divinity 
Chevis Ferber Home 

Doctor of Humane Letters 
T. Sloane Guy, Jr. 

Doctor of Laws 

Albert Coates 

John Tyler Caldwell 

Doctor of Science 
Samuel Alcott Thompson 



Bachelor of Arts 



John Alexander Alford 
Edward Martin Allen, Jr. 
Joseph Lee Arnold 
John Wesley Ashburn 
Douglass Moxley Bailey, III 
Frank Lindsay Baker, Jr. 
Frances Louise Baucom 
Peggy Elmira Berrier 
Janet Margaret Binkley 
Barbara Jean Blackmon 
Edgar L. Boggs 
Lionel F. Branscomb 
Barbara Branson 
Betty Jane Brendell 
John Wayne Bridges 
Shirley Ann Bridges 
F. Dale Bridgwater 
Sandra Louise Bright 
Fabian Amelia Broadway 
James Harry Bunn, III 
Tommy Eugene Burris 
David Hudson Butler 
Mary Louise Carrigan 
Daniel Allen Carroll 
Robert Neil Charm 
Sylvia DeLette Cheek 
Judith Penn Clayton 
Luther Darrow Cooke 



Fred Leon Coward, III 
Michael Elmo Cox 
Lynda Jean Crawford 
Joe Durward Creech 
Benny Lee Creed 
Elizabeth Ann Cross 
William C. B. Cullen 
William Crawford Currin 
William Robert Curtis 
Max Eugene Deal 
Carolyn Sue Denning 
Bobby Gene Downing 
Raymond Eugene Ebert, Jr. 
James Earl Ezzell, Jr. 
Boyd Leon Farmer 
Patricia Ann Farson 
Kenneth Edwin Ferrell 
Sylvia Marie Ferrell 
Lawrence Bernard Fleisher 
Bobbie Jean Fleming 
Linda Ford 

Eugenia Thetus Funderburk 
Daniel Everette Gilbert 
Charles Roland Goss 
Claire Helen Greer 
Hugh Donald Griffin, Jr. 
Martha Gullick 
David Warren Hadley 



254 



Degrees Conferred 



Robert Roydon Hale-Cooper 

Mary Priscilla Hamrick 

Patricia Gay Harrell 

Frank Bosley Haskell, III 

Kenneth John Phillip Hauser, Jr. 

Mark Douglas Hawthorne 

Emma Jane Hedrick 

Lowell Wesley Hedrick 

William Henry Heins 

Frances Grey Helms 

Mary Ada Hendricks 

Marcus Hester 

John Rudolph Heydt 

George A. Hill 

Jean Elizabeth Hobby 

James Olen Hodges 

Thomas Ward Hogan 

Robert Bernard Holder 

Betty Lou Hollifield 

Clark Mason Holt 

Benjamin Lawrence Honeycutt 

Judith A. Hughey 

James Wilton Hunt 

Cornelia Jane Huskins 

Harold Wayne Idol 

Gerald Scott James 

Judith Elaine Jeffreys 

Mary Antoinette Johnson 

Hillary Harriette Jones 

Wayne Eugene Jordan 

Frances Estelle Joyce 

Elizabeth Ann Julian 

Lois Katzin 

Ronald Clayton Kester 

John Wesley Kimball, Jr. 

Anna Ruth King 

Robert Benjamin Kupiszewski 

Elizabeth Ray Lackey 

Herbert Allen Lanier 

Ernest V. Lehto, Jr. 

Thomas Jefferson Le Vines 

Arthur Ernst Lippert 

Nancy Rebecca Long 

Mary Alice McBrayer 



Elaine Montgomery McCrary 
Clinton Eugene McElroy 
Sue Ann McGahey 
Raymond Carl McRorie 
Patricia Rose Malcom 
Robert Clifton Mann 
Coleman Cain Markham 
Zeno Martin, Jr. 
Martha Ann Mason 
Virginia Dianne Mattocks 
Robert Joseph Mayberry 
Reginald Barnett Medlock 
Hilda Jean Melton 
Charles B. Merryman 
Carlton Glenn Miller 
Mary Patricia Miller 
David Alexander Mitchell 
Helen Beckwith Moore 
Kay Frances Moore 
Dan Lincoln Morrill 
Robert Franklin Mull 
Julia Elaine Nance 
Martha Lane Kiser Odom 
Patricia Anne O'Neil 
George Allen Parker 
Carolyn Faith Paschal 
Elwood C. Peele, Jr. 
Glain Sherrill Pennell 
Ronald Augustus Peterson 
Betty Susan Phillips 
William Rufus Phillips 
Janice Mae Priode 
Dottie Gene Privette 
George Blackburn Pruden, Jr. 
Gayle Edward Ramsey 
David Albert Rawley, Jr. 
Robert Roy Redwine 
John Frederick Riley 
Frederick Strickland Rolater 
Barbara Anne Safriet 
Samuel Lentz Sanders 
Carolyn Dickson Sapp 
Donald Owen Schoonmaker 
Patricia Scott 



255 



Degrees Conferred 



Bruce Willingham Sellers, Jr. 
Hessie Lou Severt 
Judith Gray Shaw 
Edith Leduska Shepherd 
Sarah Gay Simerson 
John Wesley Simpson 
Patsy Meares Singletary 
Kermit Wayne Smith 
Thomas Alexander Smith 
Ruth Ellen Sorrell 
Rayford Michael Sowell 
William Earl Stanley, Jr. 
Dale Oren Steele 
Charles Hadley Stevens, Jr. 
William Penn Haney Stevens, Jr. 
James Robert Swafford 
John Earl Thompson 
Carmean Tribble 
James Thomas Turner 
Bobby Dean Wagoner 



Jennings Lee Wagoner, Jr. 
Charles Thomas Waldrop 
Grace Marie Wallace 
Eddie Roy Walters 
Frederick Wm. Harris Wardlaw 
Barbara Cornwell Warlick 
Billy Gene Washburn 
Eleanor Anne Watkins 
James Randolph Welborn 
Sylvia Jones German Wellborn 
Anne Morrison Wheless 
Anne Adelaide Whicker 
Glen Love White 
Betty Ray Whitaker 
Raymond Henry White 
Millison Anne Whitehead 
Patricia Woodward 
Dewey Blake Yokely 
Edwin O. Young, III 
Carolyn Lee Yow 



Bachelor of Science 



Hubert Wayne Bare 
George Reginald Bell, Jr. 
Joseph Edward Belton 
John Franklin Bergner, Jr. 
Edith Marie Berry 
Bruce Boteler 

Christopher Lewis Bramlett 
Mary Lee Britt 
Richard Lee Burleson 
Leroy Conrad Butler 
Vada Ann Byers 
Joey Mieshele Carter 
Janet Lee Cashwell 
William Lester Childers, Jr. 
Marilyn Matthews Cook 
Robert Glenn Cooke, Jr. 
Joseph Whitfield Creech 
Janet Lea Crutchfield 
Aubrey Gibson Currie 
Branch Howard Daniels, Jr. 
Allen Clark Dotson 
Margaret Ann Dutton 



James Carr Eagle, Jr. 
Frank George Eckert 
Barbara Cornelia England 
Charles Vernon Floyd, Jr. 
George Wells Freeman 
Ellen Patricia Gay 
Karl Ray Gentry 
James Lee Graham 
Boyce Reid Haigler 
William Alfred Hall, Jr. 
Richard Doub Hauser 
Jo Ann Hayes 
Billy Dean Hester 
Thomas Waddell Hill 
Wilton Ottis Holliday, Jr. 
Iris La Rae Honeycutt 
Frances Geraldine Jolly Horn 
Barbara Elizabeth Horton 
Sara Elizabeth Houser 
Roy Linwood Hughes, Jr. 
Deane Hudley, III 
Carl Thomas Jarrell 



256 



Degrees Conferred 



Luther Dores Kimrey 
Paul Francis Kittinger, Jr. 
Wayne Carson Koontz 
Timothy See Yiu Lam 
Marcus Sexton Lawrence 
Willa Lynn Leary 
Hughie Elmore Lewis 
Marcus Bruce Liles, Jr. 
Roy Gary Lopp 
Clarence Vergil Lyda, Jr. 
William Kenneth McRae 
James Wilson Mackie 
Willis Crocker Maddrey 
George Alex Marsh, III 
James Wilbur Martin 
Paul V. Martin 
Rowland Lanier Matteson, Jr. 
Dennis Owen Medlock 
Frederick Thomas Merola 
David William Metcalf 
Gerald Edwards Mitchell 
David Lawrence Moore 
Geraldene Edwina Moore 
Daniel Norman Moury 
Stephen Nemeth 
Nathan Frank Orovitz 
Rae Carroll Padgett 
Linda Mae Paige 
Leslie Weil Paley 
William M. Paris, Jr. 
Arthur Saxton Parker, Jr. 
Lloyd Jinnette Parker, Jr. 



Jackie David Phillips 
Janie Dale Poole 
Joseph Pearson Rawley 
Sammy Davis Reese 
Donald L. Richardson 
Jimmy Wilford Ruse 
Barbara Jeanette Sain 
Stephen Leon Sasser 
Lewis Joseph Schwartz 
Patricia Loretta Sechrist 
William Glenn Shepherd 
Donald C. Silcox 
Barbara Ann Smith 
Frances Leila Smith 
Jackson Bruce Smith 
William Dwight Smith 
Wallace Clayton Snipes 
Thurman Lee Spach, Jr. 
Horace Dean Steadman, Jr. 
Helen Marie Stinson 
Ronald Edward Thomas 
Saundra Reata Tucker 
George Thomas Ward 
Charles Leonard Warwick 
John Washburn, Jr. 
Wendell Kay Watkins 
Carolyn Jean Webb 
Marshall Winston Wiggins 
William Joseph Williamson 
Edward Tyree Wilson 
Ray Marshall Woodlief 



Bachelor of Business Administration 



John Charles Albaugh 
Ben Geer Alderman, Jr. 
Fritts Lewis Biesecker 
John M. Bostic 
John Samuel Braswell, III 
Robert Ray Bray 
Robert David Brown 
John Hamilton Cantrell, Jr. 
Marvin Pendleton Carter, Jr. 
Harold Leon Collis 



Ausbin Q. Cook 
Robert Franklin Crumpler 
Joseph Raymond Cumby 
Felix Brenard Dalton 
O. Thomas Dancy 
Fred Monroe Dawson 
John McCamie Dearmon 
Franklin D. Denny 
Cecil Coleman Dew 
Allen Eugene Doyle 



17 



257 



Degrees Conferred 



William Bennett Dunnagan 
Samuel Bruce Edwards, Jr. 
Eloise Critz Ellis 
Wallace Groome Freemon, Jr. 
Richard L. Gilbert 
Gene Glasco 

John Crawford Hamilton 
Phyllis Davis Hedrick 
Robert Allen Hewett 
James Roy Higgins, Jr. 
Joan L. Hill 
Edward Gray Hine 
Billy Gray Hinshaw 
Dock Ardell Huggins 
Gerald Bernard Huth 
Stephen LaMarr Ingram 
Terry Luther Johnson 
Nancy Hardwick Jones 
Samuel David Jordan 
Charles Herbert Keller, Jr. 
Reginald Clifton Koontz 
Walter Richard Lang 
Don Juan LaNier 
Malcolm Keith Lanier 
Luther Ellis Ledford, Jr. 
James Robert Lee 



Gloria Flake Lockerman 
Albert Henderson Lowdermilk 
Carl Raymond McCorkle 
Eleanore Jeanine McGee 
Neil B. MacLean 
John Thomas Mills 
Joseph Hodge Mims 
John Richard Moore, Jr. 
Elwyn Grey Murray, Jr. 
Harry Vernon Nelson, Jr. 
Jack Blackwell Paley 
James Hardin Philpott 
Billie Norman Pickett 
James Sheely Pope 
William Allan Pope, III 
Arthur Jackson Pryor 
John E. Ramsey, Jr. 
Sion Chester Rogers, Jr. 
Jerry Joe Stephenson 
Russell Lee Stephenson, Jr. 
B. D. Street 

Hugh Emmette Wallace 
Robert Franklin Watson 
Jerry Wayne West 
Ralph Leon White, III 
John Robert Yarbrough 



Bachelor of Laws 



William Drew Arrowood 
Cade Lee Austin 
Ernest Harold Ball 
Plato Collins Barwick, Jr. 
Donald Raymond Canady 
Ronald Conrad Dilthey 
Marshall F. Dotson, Jr. 
Delmar Lamar Dowda 
Kennieth S. Etheridge 
Cyrus James Faircloth 
Robert Humphrey Forbes 
Charles Gilmore Furr 
Carroll F. Gardner 
Clive Irvin Goodson 
Marvin Kenneth Gray 
John Samuel Groves 



Harold Gene Hall 
William Evan Hall 
John Henderson Hasty 
Franklin Nance Jackson 
Bobby Frank Jones 
Robert Alden Jones 
Robert Kason Keiger 
I. Beverly Lake, Jr. 
James Edmund Lassiter 
Bob Wilson Lawing 
Robert E. Lee, Jr. 
Clinton Orville Light 
Carroll R. Lowder 
William Flynt Marshall, Jr. 
George Baird Mast 
Louis B. Meyer 



258 



Degrees Conferred 



John Garland Mills, III 
George Coan Mountcastle 
Joseph Charles McDarris 
Harrell Powell, Jr. 
Robert Joseph Robinson 
Robert Franklin Rush 
Robert Gordon Smith 



Charles Lawson Snipes, Jr. 
James Norman Stephens 
Thomas Williford Thomas 
Richard Moore Warren 
Frank Joseph Yeager 
James Monroe Yelton, Jr. 



Doctor of Medicine 



Douglass Franklin Adams 
William Howard Admirand 
George Herbert Armstrong 
Curtis L. Bakken 
George Curtis Barber 
C. J. Stanley Beckman 
William Spain Belmont 
Norris Angle Biggerstaff 
John Paul Blake 
Gray Thomas Boyette 
Paul Douglas Boyles 
Paul Richard Brown 
Jimmie Ray Cleary 
Gary Benjamin Copeland 
Carl Robert Denny 
J. Edwin Drew 
George Dyer Duffield 
Robert Henry Fleming 
Ricardo Galbis-Beltran 
Hortense Bee Gatling 
Jose Vicente Gonzalez-Angel 
Donald Guber 
Mary Ann Hampton 
Ernest Julian Henson, Jr. 
Robert C. Heymann 
James Noah Hinson 
Owen Ray Hunt 



Robert Ellsworth Jones, Jr. 
George William Joyce 
John Frederick Kappler, Jr. 
John Edward Kehoe 
Samuel See-On Lam 
Donald Melvin Larson 
Wayne Philip Lowe 
Hurschell Frederick Mathews 
John Scott Miller, Jr. 
Thomas Walker Monaghan 
Armando de Moya Castro 
Fay Knickerbocker Myers 
Timothy Clinard Pennell 
Kenneth Alton Powell 
Thomas Alexander Readling 
Vade G. Rhoades 
Stephen Payne Robinson 
Fleming Fuller Royal 
Ronnie Lee Stanley 
Francis Bailey Teague, Jr. 
Lewis William Thompson 
Kenneth Guy Tomberlin 
Hugh T. Wallace 
Mary Curry Ward 
Sidney Alfred Wike 
Sudie Doggett Wike 



Master of Science 

Robert Parker Pulliam 
August 27. 1960 



259 



SUMMER DIVISION OF THE CLASS OP 1960 

Saturday, August 8 
1 1 :00 a.m. Address — James W. Mason 

DEGREES CONFERRED 

Bachelor of Arts 



Lois Dempsey Bentley 
Fredrick Stanley Black 
Ronald Wayne Brown 
Cynthia Gough Cain 
Dempsey Aaron Calhoun 
Donna Jean Campbell 
Raleigh Fountain Carroll, Jr. 
Judith Cottrell Castner 
Robert Lee Davis 
Charles Maynard Forbes 
Lawrence Douglas Foust 
Eugene Keith Franklin 
Ann Highsmith Hill 



Jerome William Hillebrand 
Maurice Westbrook Home 
Gerald Franklin Humphrey 
James Haywood Kennedy 
Lucy Ann Knight 
Douglas Clifton Lackey 
Joseph Gray Lawson 
Emmanuel Poole Pegram 
Nancy Sue Spry 
Charles Lewis Tanner 
Frederick Monroe Tate 
Michael Craig Tilley 



Bachelor of Science 



William Bernard Barrow 
Billy Gray Brown 
Orrin William Clifton 
Douglas Duncan Dean 
E. Larry Fabian 
Arthur Walter Glenn, Jr. 
Billy Huel Hauser 
Peggy Taylor Hitchcock 
Philip Marcus Ho 
Jerry Albert Johnson 
Wayne Alden Johnson 
Walter Bion Jolly 
Denver Hartford Lennon, Jr. 
Betty Jean Downs Liles 
Neil Davis McCurry 
Margaret Rose Martin 



P. Muriel Martin 
Martha Ann Williamson 

Matherly 
George Franklin May 
Karl Kinard Munn 
Donald Lee Nanney 
Jerry Wayne Odom 
Dayle Kellcy Phillips 
George Delano Ritchie 
Richard George Rogers 
Charles Michael Steadman 
Jackie Benjamin Strum 
Thomas Ray Vaughn 
James Opie Wells, Jr. 
Hildreth Floyd Wilkins, Jr. 
Weston Alexander Willis 



Bachelor of Business Administration 



Jimmy T. Bowman 
Chad W. Bumgarner 
William Samuel Butler 
Harry E. Caudle 
Jerry Samuel Harding 
Ernest Eugene Hopkins, 
John Banner Horton 



III 



Clifton Ray McLaurin 
David Sherrill Monk 
Donald Gray Paschal 
Wade Hampton Paschal, Jr. 
Frank Welborn Robertson 
Robert Branson Sheets, Jr. 
Frank Graves Spencer, Jr. 



260 



ROTC GRADUATES COMMISSIONED IN THE 
UNITED STATES ARMY RESERVE 



John R. Heydt 
Raymond C. McRorie* 



January 1960 

Jack B. Paley 

Horace D. Steadman, Jr. 



June 1960 



John M. Bostic 
David H. Butler 
John H. Cantrell, Jr.* 
Fred L. Coward, III 
Robert F. Crumpler 
William R. Curtis 
James C. Eagle, Jr.* 
Samuel B. Edwards, Jr. 
Wallace G. Freemon, Jr. 
John C. Hamilton ** 
Robert A. Hewett 
James O. Hodges* 
Harold W. Idol* 
Charles H. Keller, Jr. 
Robert B. Kupiszewski* 
Malcolm K. Lanier 



Hughie E. Lewis 
Charles B. Merryman, Jr. 
David W. Metcalf 
John T. Mills* 
William M. Paris, Jr.* 
Jackie D. Phillips 
Gayle E. Ramsey 
John F. Riley 
Bruce W. Sellers, Jr.* 
Kermit W. Smith* 
William D. Smith 
Jerry J. Stephenson 
James T. Turner* 
Charles T. Waldrop* 
Jerry W. West* 
John R. Yarbrough* 



William W. Aycock* 
Aubrey G. Currie 
Kenneth E. Ferrell 



July 1960 

Samuel D. Jordan 
Wade H. Paschal, Jr. 
William A. Pope 
Frederick M. Tate 



Charles M. Forbes 
John B. Horton 

William S. Butler 



August 1960 

Charles M. Steadman 

October 1960 



• Distinguished Military Graduate 

•* Distinguished Military Graduate commissioned in the Regular Army 



261 



Summary 



SUMMARY— FALL 1960 



Liberal Arts: Men Women Total 

Seniors 252 120 372 

Juniors 225 104 329 

Sophomores 295 104 399 

Freshmen 570 126 696 

Unclassified 19 3 22 



1,361 457 1,818 1,818 
Business Administration: 

Seniors 77 2 79 

Juniors 70 2 72 

147 4 151 151 
Law: 

Third Year 37 1 38 

Second Year 25 1 26 

First Year 51 51 

Unclassified 1 1 

114 2 116 116 
Medicine: 

Fourth Year 48 6 54 

Third Year 45 5 50 

Second Year 51 4 55 

First Year 53 1 54 

Graduate Students. ... 2 1 3 

Medical Technicians. . 15 15 

199 32 231 231 

Evening: 242 46 288 288 

2,604 



262 



Registration by Departments 



SUMMER TERM OF 1960 





Men 


Women 


Totals 


Liberal Arts, 1st term. . . 


. 425 


204 


629 


Liberal Arts, 2nd term . . 


. 350 


127 


477 




21 


1 


22 




796 


332 


1,128 


Duplicates; attended 








both terms 


. 250 


86 


336 



546 246 792 

Duplicates, Summer School 

and Regular Session .. . 327 100 427 



219 146 365 365 



2,969 



Registration by Schools and Departments 



Biology 676 

Business Administration 939 

Chemistry 611 

Classical Languages: 

Greek 46 

Latin 143 

Education 45 1 

English 1,368 

History 905 

Mathematics 855 

Military Science 298 

Modern Languages: 

French 411 

German 329 

Russian 17 

Spanish 365 

Music 276 

Philosophy 374 

Physical Education 903 

Physics 240 

Political Science 498 

Psychology 203 

Religion 696 

Sociology 419 

Speech 152 

268 



Geographical Distribution 



Geographical Distribution 

Counties in North Carolina 



Alamance 18 

Alexander 5 

Alleghany 3 

Anson 8 

Ashe 2 

Bertie 5 

Bladen 7 

Brunswick 1 

Buncombe 21 

Burke 20 

Cabarrus 25 

Caldwell 10 

Camden 2 

Carteret 8 

Catawba 17 

Chatham 7 

Cherokee 3 

Chowan 5 

Clay 1 

Cleveland 34 

Columbus 15 

Craven 7 

Cumberland 31 

Currituck 1 

Davidson 50 

Davie 6 

Duplin 6 

Durham 16 

Edgecombe 14 

Forsyth 632 

Franklin 7 

Gaston 26 

Gates 1 

Graham 1 

Granville 9 

Greene 5 

Guilford 95 

Halifax 12 

Harnett 14 

Haywood 10 

Henderson 9 



Hertford 9 

Iredell 33 

Jackson 3 

Johnston 17 

Lee 2 

Lenoir 14 

Lincoln 5 

McDowell 5 

Macon 3 

Madison 3 

Martin 6 

Mecklenburg 89 

Montgomery • 4 

Moore 9 

Nash 10 

New Hanover 26 

Northampton 6 

Onslow 4 

Pasquotank 2 

Pender 2 

Perquimans 2 

Person 8 

Pitt 7 

Randolph 14 

Richmond 12 

Robeson 26 

Rockingham 30 

Rowan 25 

Rutherford 17 

Sampson 21 

Scotland 3 

Stanly 13 

Stokes 16 

Surry 34 

Swain 3 

Transylvania 6 

Union 13 

Vance 11 

Wake 73 

Washington 2 

Watauga 5 



264 



Geographical Distribution 



Wayne 8 Wilson 7 

Wilkes 22 Yadkin 14 

Yancey 2 



States and Foreign Countries 



Alabama 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

Taiwan , 



9 

5 

1 

11 

14 

22 

44 

37 

1 

9 

1 

28 

3 

50 



North Dakota 6 

Oklahoma 1 

Ohio 27 

Pennsylvania 60 

Rhode Island 3 

South Carolina 44 

Tennessee 30 

Texas 4 

Utah 1 

Virginia 1 54 

West Virginia 19 



Wisconsin 
Columbia . 
Iran 



14 Japan 3 

6 Canal Zone 3 

1 Germany 2 

1 Hong Kong 4 

4 Iraq 1 

83 Ireland 1 

63 Turkey 1 

2 



265 



Absences 

Accounting 

Accreditation 

Administration 

Admission Requirements 

Advanced Placement .... 

Advanced Standing 
Admission 

Advisers 

Application Fee 

Art 

History and Apprecia- 
tion 

Museum 

Asian Studies Program. . 

Athletics 

Equipment 

Intercollegiate 

Attendance Require- 
ments 

Awards 

Basic Course Require- 
ments 

Biology 

Board 

Buildings, Academic .... 

Buildings, Residence .... 

Buildings and Grounds . . 

Business Administration. 

Chapel Services 

Charges 

Chemistry 

Classification 

College Calendar 

Commencement Exer- 
cises 

Committees of the 
Faculty 

Course Conditions 

Removal Procedure . . 
Seniors 

Courses of Instruction 
Business Administra- 
tion 

Liberal Arts 

Credit Hours Defined . . . 

Debate and Speech 

Debate Tournaments . . . 

Degrees 

Bachelor of Arts 

Bachelor of Business 

Administration .... 
Bachelor of Laws .... 
Bachelor of Science. . . 



INDEX 

Page Page 

64 Doctor of Medicine. . . 243 

224 Degrees Conferred 251 

7 Dentistry 124 

9 Deposits 61, 79 

59 Dormitories 53 

62 Rules 85 

Dramatics 212 

62 Economics 226 

63,118 Education 140 

60 Endowment 48 

Engineering 125 

English 146 

153 Enrollment Summary. . . 262 

57 Examinations 70 

215 Faculty 16 

Fees 75 

52 Finance 228 

109 Forensics 102 

Forestry 127 

64 Fraternities 106 

104 French 170 

Geographical Distribu- 

114 tion 264 

130 German 173 

83 Grading System 70 

50 Graduation 

53 Distinctions 72 

50 Requirements 112 

119,217 Greek 138 

108 Hindi 175 

75 Historical Sketch 44 

134 History 154 

62 Honor Societies 100 

3 Honor System 100 

Introductory Statement. 7 

252 Journalism 152 

Latin 139 

41 Law 119,219 

Libraries 54 

70 Literary Societies 101 

71 Loan Funds 96 

Majors 118 

Management 228 

224 Marketing 229 

129 Mathematics 158 

129 Medals 104 

102 Medical Technology. ... 122 

103 Medicine 243 

Military Science and 

112 Tactics 162 

Ministerial Students .... 95, 99 

119,219 Music 178 

241 Nursing 123 

112 Phi Beta Kappa 107 

266 



Index 



Page 

Philosophy 186 

Physical Education 

Courses 189 

Equipment 52 

Physics 193 

Political Science 196 

Probation 68 

Psychological Center ... 73 

Psychology 200 

Publications 107 

Quality Points 114 

Radio Station 104 

Re-admission 69 

Recitations Per Week. . . 63 

Recreational Activities . . 108 
Registration 

Dates 3 

Procedure 63 

Regulations 64 

Religion 203 

Religious Activities 108 

Religious Education .... 207 

Reports 71 

Room Regulations 85 



Page 

R.O.T.C 162 

R.O.T.C. Commissions . 261 

Russian 175 

Scholarships and Con- 
cessions 90 

Secretarial Studies 231 

Sociology 209 

Spanish 175 

Speech 212 

Speech Institute 103 

Student Government ... 100 
Summer Session 

Elsewhere 23 

Summer Term 249 

Teacher Certificate 

Requirements 141 

Theater 103 

Transcripts 72, 80 

Trustees 8 

Tuition 77 

Upper Division 117 

Veterans 73 

Withdrawal 

From College 67 

From Course 67 



267